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ir l:3rary 

NOV2&I97I 

.riOl'iii ji- ulW 
UNIVERSITY u.' TO^IONTO 




ONTARIO 



REVISED REGULATIONS 



OF 



ONTARIO, 1970 



A REVISION AND CONSOLIDATION OF REGULATIONS 

PUBLISHED UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF 

THE REGULATIONS REVISION ACT, 1968-69 



VOLUME I 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by William Kinmond, Queen's Printer and Publisher 



REVISED REGULATIONS OF ONTARIO, 1970 

VOLUME I 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

A 

Abandoned Orchards Act ^eg. page 

General 1 1 

Active Service Moratorium Act, 1943 

Application 2 3 

Administration of Justice Act 

Fees and Expenses 

General 3 7 

Justices of the Peace 4 8 

Agricultural Associations Act 

Designation of Associations 5 11 

Agricultural Development Act 

Interest on Loans 6 13 

Agricultural Development Finance Act 

Deposits 7 15 

Agricultural Societies Act 

General 8 17 

Air Pollution Control Act 

Advisory Board 9 25 

Air Contaminants from Asphalt Paving Plants 10 26 

Air Contaminants from Ferrous Foundries H 27 

Air Contaminants from Motor Vehicles 12 28 

Air Contaminants from 1969 Model Motor Vehicles 13 33 

Evaporative Emissions from New Light Duty Motor Vehicles 14 43 

General 15 47 

Grants 16 53 

Sulphur Content of Fuels I7 54 

Anatomy Act 

General 18 57 

Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 

Alignment and Brakes Mechanic 19 57 

Auto Body Repairer 20 74 

Automotive Machinist 21 86 

Automotive Painter 22 97 

Bakers 23 103 

Barbering Schools 24 108 

Barbers 25 112 

Brick and Stone Masons 26 123 

Carpenters 27 126 

ill 



iv TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act — Continued ^eg. page 

Cement Masons 28 135 

Chefs. 29 140 

Dry Cleaners 30 157 

Electricians 31 159 

Fuel and Electrical Systems Mechanic 32 164 

General 33 177 

Glazier and Metal Mechanic 34 192 

Hairdressers 35 208 

Hairdressing Schools 36 219 

Heavy Duty Equipment Mechanic 37 223 

Ironworkers. 38 240 

Lathers 39 250 

Motor Vehicle Mechanic 40 253 

Motorcycle Mechanic 41 271 

Painters and Decorators 42 281 

Plasterers 43 283 

Plumbers 44 286 

Radio and Television Service Technicians 45 289 

Service Station Attendant 46 303 

Sheet Metal Workers 47 312 

Steamfitters 48 315 

Transmission Mechanic 49 318 

Truck-Trailer Repairer 50 324 

Watch Repairers 51 332 

Workers in Servicing and InstaUing Air-Conditioning or Refrigerating Equipment 52 338 

Archaeological and Historic Sites Protection Act 

Archaeological Sites 53 341 

Historic Sites 54 344 

Architects Act 

Complaints 55 345 

Artificial Insemination of Cattle Act 

General 56 347 

Assessment Act 

Assessment Areas and Regions 57 351 

Enumeration Questionnaire 58 353 

Form of Census Report 59 355 

Notice of Assessment Under Subsection 1 of Section 40 of the Act 60 356 

Payments to Mining MunicipaHties, 1970 61 359 

Assignment of Book Debts Act 

Form of Renewal Statement 62 363 

General 63 364 

Athletics Control Act 

Amount of Tax 64 369 

General 65 370 

B 

Bailiffs Act 

General 66 405 

Barristers Act 

Fee for Appointment as Queen's Counsel 67 409 



TABLE OF CONTENTS v 

Beach Protection Act Reg page 

General 68 411 

Beef Cattle Marketing Act 

Licence Fees 69 415 

Weighing of Beef Carcasses 70 417 

Bees Act 

General 71 419 

Bills of Sale and Chattel Mortgages Act 

Chattel Mortgages 72 423 

Fees Concerning Bills of Sale 73 427 

Blind Persons' Allowances Act 

General 74 429 

Boilers and Pressure Vessels Act 

General 75 439 

Boundaries Act 

General 76 457 

Brucellosis Act 

Vaccination 77 459 

Business Corporations Act 

General 78 463 



C 

Cemeteries Act 

Closings and Removals 79 499 

General 86 504 

Trust Funds 81 508 

Certification of Titles Act 

Certification Areas 82 515 

General 83 516 

Change of Name Act 

Fees and Forms 84 535 

Charitable Institutions Act 

General 85 537 

Child Welfare Act 

General 86 563 

Children's Boarding Homes Act 

General 87 615 

Children's Institutions Act 

General 88 625 

Children's Mental Hospitals Act 

General 89 649 



vi TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Chiropody Act Reg. page 

General 90 651 

Collection Agencies Act 

General 91 657 

Commissioners for taking Affidavits Act 

Fees 92 667 

Community Centres Act 

Grants 93 669 

Community Psychiatric Hospitals Act 

General 94 671 

Grants 95 674 

Commuter Services Act 

General 96 681 

Conditional Sales Act 

General 97 689 

Condominium Act 

General 98 693 

Conservation Authorities Act 

Conservation Areas 

Big Creek Region 99 713 

Cataraqui Region 100 715 

Credit Valley 101 717 

Grand River 102 719 

Holland Valley 103 721 

Lower Thames Valley 104 723 

Metropolitan Toronto and Region 105 725 

Otter Creek 106 728 

Rideau Valley 107 730 

Fill 

Ausable River 108 731 

Cataraqui Region 109 732 

Grand Valley 110 733 

Junction Creek Ill 734 

Mattagami Valley 112 735 

Moira River 113 736 

Spencer Creek 114 737 

Sydenham Valley 115 738 

Fill and Alteration of Waterways 

Big Creek Region 116 739 

Fill and Construction 

Central Lake Ontario. 117 741 

Hamilton Region 118 748 

Otonabee Region 119 750 

Upper Thames River 120 754 

Fill, Construction and Alteration of Waterways 

Grand River 121 756 

Halton Region 122 758 

Kettle Creek 123 760 

Lower Thames Valley 124 762 

Metropolitan Toronto and Region 125 764 



TABLE OF CONTENTS vii 

Construction Hoists Act Reg. page 

General 126 767 

Construction Safety Act 

General U7 785 

Consumer Protection Act 

General 128 809 

Controverted Elections Act 

Procedure 129 827 

Co-operative Loans Act 

General 130 835 

Coroners Act 

Fees 131 839 

Forms 132 840 

Corporation Securities Registration Act 

Fees 133 845 

Corporations Act 

Evidence of Bona Fides on Applications 134 847 

General 135 854 

Insider Trading and Proxy Solicitation 136 866 

Corporations Information Act 

Content of Annual Return 137 877 

General 138 878 

Corporations Tax Act 

General 139 879 

Costs of Distress Act 

Costs 140 887 

County Judges Act 

Shorthand Writers 141 889 

Credit Unions Act 

Incorporation 142 891 

Crop Insurance Act (Ontario) 

Arbitration Proceedings 143 893 

Crop Insurance Plan 

Apples 144 894 

Corn 145 903 

Corn Silage 146 913 

Forage 147 921 

Peas 148 930 

Potatoes 149 938 

Soybean 150 947 

Spring Grain 151 955 

Sweet Corn 152 964 

Tomatoes 153 973 

White Beans 154 984 

Winter Wheat 155 992 



viii TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Crop Insurance Act (Ontario) — Continued REg. page 
Crop Insurance Plans 

General 156 1001 

Designation of Insurable Crops 157 1005 

Premium Discounts 158 1006 

Crown Timber Act 

General 159 1007 



Day Nurseries Act 

General 160 1021 

Dead Animal Disposal Act 

General 161 1041 

Dental Technicians Act 

General 162 1049 

Dentistry Act 

Dental Hygienists 163 1053 

Registration Fee 164 1056 

Department of Agriculture and Food Act 

Extension of Duties of Minister 165 1057 

Department of Correctional Services Act 

General 166 1059 

Parole 167 1065 

Department of Education Act 

Arena Managers' Certificates and Arena Programs. 168 1069 

Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology 169 1071 

Algonquin 176 1074 

Cambrian 171 1075 

Centennial 172 1076 

Conestoga 173 1077 

Confederation 174 1078 

Durham 175 1079 

Fanshawe. 176 1080 

George Brown 177 1081 

Georgian 178 1082 

Humber 179 1083 

Lambton 188 1084 

Loyalist 181 1085 

Mohawk 182 1086 

Niagara 183 1087 

Northern 184 1088 

St. Clair 185 1089 

St. Lawrence 186 1090 

Seneca 187 1091 

Sheridan 188 1092 

Sir Sandford Fleming 189 1093 

Elementary and Secondary Schools 

Diplomas 19* 1094 

General 191 1107 



TABLE OF CONTENTS ix 

Department of Education Act — Continued REG. page 
Elementary Schools 

Inspectors' Certificates 192 1123 

General Legislative Grants 193 1 126 

General Legislative Grants, 1969 194 1 138 

Grants for Non-Profit Camps 195 1 149 

Interim Teaching Certificates 196 1 150 

Municipal Recreation Directors, Certificates 197 1175 

Ontario Schools for the Blind and Ontario Schools for the Deaf 198 1178 

Permanent Teaching Certificates 199 1 182 

Programs of Recreation [ 200 1 191 

Purchase of Milk 201 1193 

Reimbursement for Cost of Education in Territorial Districts or Crown Lands 202 1194 

Scholarships for Study Outside Ontario 203 1 197 

Schools for Trainable Retarded Children 204 1198 

Special Certificates 205 1201 

Supervisory Officers 206 1231 

Teachers' Colleges 207 1232 

Teachers' Contracts 208 1242 

Text-books 209 1245 

The Sudbury Teachers' College and The University of Ottawa Teachers' College 210 1258 

Vocational Building and Equipment Grants 211 1265 

Department of Labour Act 

Labour Safety Council 212 1271 

Proceedings of the Board 213 1272 

Underground Work 214 1273 

Department of Municipal Affairs Act 

Municipal Auditors 215 1297 

Tax Arrears and Tax Sale Procedures 216 1301 

Department of Revenue Act 

Delegation of Ministerial Power 217 1305 

Department of Social and Family Services Act 

Institutions Under Control of Minister 218 1307 

Department of Tourism and Information Act 

General 219 1309 

Grants for Museums 220 1329 

Historical Parks 221 1330 

Fees 222 1333 

Deposits Regulation Act 

General 223 1335 

Disabled Persons' Allowances Act 

General 224 1337 

District Welfare Administration Boards Act 

t Application for Grant Under Section 10 of the Act 225 1349 
Dog Tax and Live Stock and Poultry Protection Act 

Dogs at Large in Unorganized Areas 226 1353 
Drainage Act 

Rules of Practice and Procedure to be Followed in all Proceedings Before the Referee 227 1355 
I 



X TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Drugless Practitioners Act REG. page 

Chiropractors 228 1359 

Classifications 229 1364 

General 230 1365 

Masseurs 231 1369 

Osteopaths 232 1373 

Physiotherapists 233 1379 



Edible Oil Products Act 

General 234 1385 

Elderly Persons Centres Act 

General 235 1391 

Elderly Persons' Housing Aid Act 

Grants 236 1397 

Election Act 

Fees and Expenses 237 1401 

Elevators and Lifts Act 

General 238 1405 

Rope Tows and Ski Lifts 239 1420 

Embalmers and Funeral Directors Act 

General 240 1429 

Employment Agencies Act 

General 241 1441 

Employment Standards Act 

Ambulance Service Industry 242 1453 

Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry 243 1454 

General 244 1455 

Highway Transport Industry 245 1461 

Hotel, Motel, Tourist Resort, Restaurant and Tavern Industry 246 1462 

Interurban and Municipal Transportation Industry 247 1463 

Local Cartage Industry 248 1464 

Road Building Industry 249 1465 

Taxi Industry 250 1466 

Termination of Employment 251 1467 



TABLE OF REGULATIONS 

CONTAINED IN VOLUMES 1 TO 4 OF 

REVISED REGULATIONS OF ONTARIO, 1970 



> 



I 



VOLUME 1 

A 

Abandoned Orchards Act REg. 

General 1 

Active Service Moratorium Act, 1943 

Application 2 

Administration of Justice Act 

Fees and Expenses 

General 3 

Justices of the Peace 4 

Agricultural Associations Act 

Designation of Associations 5 

Agricultural Development Act 

Interest on Loans 6 

Agricultural Development Finance Act 

Deposits 7 

Agricultural Societies Act 

General 8 

Air Pollution Control Act 

Advisory Board 9 

Air Contaminants from Asphalt Paving Plants 10 

Air Contaminants from Ferrous Foundries H 

Air Contaminants from Motor Vehicles 12 

Air Contaminants from 1969 Model Motor Vehicles 13 

Evaporative Emissions from New Light Duty Motor Vehicles 14 

General I5 

Grants 1^ 

Sulphur Content of Fuels I7 

Anatomy Act 

General Ig 

Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 

Alignment and Brakes Mechanic I9 

Auto Body Repairer 20 

Automotive Machinist 21 

Automotive Painter 22 

Bakers 23 

Barbering Schools 24 

Barbers 25 

Brick and Stone Masons 26 

Carpenters 27 

xi 



Xii TABLE OF REGULATIONS 

Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act — Continued K£<^- 

Cement Masons • 28 

Chefs. 29 

Dry Cleaners 30 

Electricians 31 

Fuel and Electrical Systems Mechanic 32 

General 33 

Glazier and Metal Mechanic 34 

Hairdressers 35 

Hairdressing Schools 36 

Heavy Duty Equipment Mechanic 37 

Ironworkers 38 

Lathers. 39 

Motor Vehicle Mechanic 40 

Motorcycle Mechanic 41 

Painters and Decorators 42 

Plasterers 43 

Plumbers 44 

Radio and Television Service Technicians 45 

Service Station Attendant 46 

Sheet Metal Workers 47 

Steamfitters 48 

Transmission Mechanic 49 

Truck-Trailer Repairer 50 

Watch Repairers 51 

Workers in Servicing and Installing Air-Conditioning or Refrigerating Equipment 52 

Arcliaeological and Historic Sites Protection Act 

Archaeological Sites 53 

Historic Sites 54 

Architects Act 

Complaints 55 

Artificial Insemination of Cattle Act 

General 56 

Assessment Act 

Assessment Areas and Regions 57 

Enumeration Questionnaire 58 

Form of Census Report 59 

Notice of Assessment Under Subsection 1 of Section 40 of the Act 60 

Payments to Mining Municipahties, 1970 61 

Assignment of Book Debts Act 

Form of Renewal Statement 62 

General 63 

Athletics Control Act 

Amount of Tax 64 

General 65 

B 

Bailiffs Act 

General 66 

Barristers Act 

Fee for Appointment as Queen's Counsel 67 



TABLE OF REGULATIONS xiii 

Beach Protection Act Reg. 

GeneraL 68 

Beef Cattle Marketing Act 

Licence Fees 69 

Weighing of Beef Carcasses 70 

Bees Act 

GeneraL 71 

Bills of Sale and Chattel Mortgages Act 

Chattel Mortgages 72 

Fees Concerning Bills of Sale 73 

Blind Persons' Allowances Act 

GeneraL 74 

Boilers and Pressure Vessels Act 

GeneraL 75 

Boundaries Act 

General 76 

Brucellosis Act 

Vaccination 77 

Business Corporations Act 

General 78 



C 

Cemeteries Act 

Closings and Remov^als 79 

General 80 

Trust Funds 81 

Certification of Titles Act 

Certification Areas 82 

General 83 

Change of Name Act 

Fees and Forms 84 

Charitable Institutions Act 

General 85 

Child Welfare Act 

General 86 

[Children's Boarding Homes Act 

General 87 

Children's Institutions Act 

GeneraL 88 

Children's Mental Hospitals Act 

General 89 



xiv TABLE OF REGULATIONS 

Chiropody Act REG. 

General 90 

Collection Agencies Act 

General 91 

Commissioners for taking Affidavits Act 

Fees 92 

Community Centres Act 

Grants 93 

Community Psychiatric Hospitals Act 

General 94 

Grants 95 

Commuter Services Act 

General 96 

Conditional Sales Act 

General 97 

Condominium Act 

General 98 

Conservation Authorities Act 

Conservation Areas 

Big Creek Region 99 

Cataraqui Region 100 

Credit Valley 101 

Grand River 102 

Holland Valley 103 

Lower Thames Valley 104 

Metropolitan Toronto and Region 105 

Otter Creek 106 

Rideau Valley 107 

Fill 

Ausable River 108 

Cataraqui Region 109 

Grand Valley 110 

Junction Creek Ill 

Mattagami Valley 112 

Moira River 113 

Spencer Creek 114 

Sydenham Valley 115 

Fill and Alteration of Waterways 

Big Creek Region 1 16 

Fill and Construction 

Central Lake Ontario. 117 

Hamilton Region 118 

Otonabee Region 119 

Upper Thames River 120 

Fill, Construction and Alteration of Waterways 

Grand River 121 

Halton Region 122 

Kettle Creek 123 

Lower Thames Valley 124 

Metropolitan Toronto and Region 125 



TABLE OF REGULATIONS xv 

Construction Hoists Act reg. 

General 126 

Construction Safety Act 

General 127 

Consumer Protection Act 

General 128 

Controverted Elections Act 

Procedure 129 

Co-operative Loans Act 

General 13q 

Coroners Act 

Fees 131 

Forms 132 

Corporation Securities Registration Act 

Fees 133 

Corporations Act 

Evidence of Bona Fides on Applications 134 

General 135 

Insider Trading and Proxy Solicitation 136 

Corporations Information Act 

Content of Annual Return 137 

General 138 

Corporations Tax Act 

General 139 

Costs of Distress Act 

Costs 140 

County Judges Act 

Shorthand Writers 141 

Credit Unions Act 

Incorporation 142 

Crop Insurance Act (Ontario) 

Arbitration Proceedings 143 

Crop Insurance Plan 

Apples 144 

Corn 145 

Corn Silage 146 

Forage 147 

Peas 148 

Potatoes 149 

Soybean 150 

Spring Grain 151 

Sweet Corn 152 

Tomatoes 153 

White Beans 154 

Winter Wheat 155 



xvi TABLE OF REGULATIONS 

Crop Insurance Act (Ontario) — Continued reg. 
Crop Insurance Plans 

General 156 

Designation of Insurable Crops 157 

Premium Discounts 158 

Crown Timber Act 

General 159 



Day Nurseries Act 

General 16® 

Dead Animal Disposal Act 

General 161 

Dental Technicians Act 

General 162 

Dentistry Act 

Dental Hygienists 163 

Registration Fee 164 

Department of Agriculture and Food Act 

Extension of Duties of Minister 165 

Department of Correctional Services Act 

General 166 

Parole 167 

Department of Education Act 

Arena Managers' Certificates and Arena Programs. 168 

Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology 169 

Algonquin 179 

Cambrian 171 

Centennial 172 

Conestoga 173 

Confederation 174 

Durham 175 

Fanshawe. 176 

George Brown 177 

Georgian 178 

Humber 179 

Lambton 180 

Loyalist 181 

Mohawk 182 

Niagara 183 

Northern 184 

St. Clair 185 

St. Lawrence 186 

Seneca 187 

Sheridan 188 

Sir Sandford Fleming 189 

Elementary and Secondary Schools 

Diplomas 190 

General 191 



TABLE OF REGULATIONS xvii 

Department of Education Act— Continued REG. 
Elementary Schools 

Inspectors' Certificates 192 

General Legislative Grants 193 

General Legislative Grants, 1969 194 

Grants for Non-Profit Camps 195 

Interim Teaching Certificates 196 

Municipal Recreation Directors, Certificates 197 

Ontario Schools for the Blind and Ontario Schools for the Deaf 198 

Permanent Teaching Certificates 199 

Programs of Recreation 200 

Purchase of Milk 201 

Reimbursement for Cost of Education in Territorial Districts or Crown Lands 202 

Scholarships for Study Outside Ontario 203 

Schools for Trainable Retarded Children 204 

Special Certificates 205 

Supervisory Officers 206 

Teachers' Colleges . .^ 207 

Teachers' Contracts 208 

Text-books 209 

The Sudbury Teachers' College and The University of Ottawa Teachers' College 210 

Vocational Building and Equipment Grants 211 

Department of Labour Act 

Labour Safety Council 212 

Proceedings of the Board 213 

Underground Work 214 

Department of Municipal Affairs Act 

Municipal Auditors 215 

Tax Arrears and Tax Sale Procedures 216 

Department of Revenue Act 

Delegation of Ministerial Power 217 

Department of Social and Family Services Act 

Institutions Under Control of Minister 218 

Department of Tourism and Information Act 

General 219 

Grants for Museums 220 

Historical Parks 221 

Fees 222 

Deposits Regulation Act 

General 223 

Disabled Persons' Allowances Act 

General 224 

District Welfare Administration Boards Act 

Application for Grant Under Section 10 of the Act 225 

Dog Tax and Live Stock and Poultry Protection Act 

Dogs at Large in Unorganized Areas 226 

Drainage Act 

Rules of Practice and Procedure to be Followed in all Proceedings Before the Referee 227 



xviii TABLE OF REGULATIONS 

Drugless Practitioners Act reg. 

Chiropractors 228 

Classifications . . . .^ 229 

General 230 

Masseurs 231 

Osteopaths 232 

Physiotherapists 233 

E 

Edible Oil Products Act 

General 234 

Elderly Persons Centres Act 

General 235 

Elderly Persons' Housing Aid Act 

Grants 236 

Election Act 

Fees and Expenses 237 

Elevators and Lifts Act 

General 238 

Rope Tows and Ski Lifts 239 

Embalmers and Funeral Directors Act 

General 240 

Employment Agencies Act 

General 241 

Employment Standards Act 

Ambulance Service Industry 242 

Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry 243 

General 244 

Highway Transport Industry 245 

Hotel, Motel, Tourist Resort, Restaurant and Tavern Industry 246 

Interurban and Municipal Transportation Industry 247 

Local Cartage Industry 248 

Road Building Industry 249 

Taxi Industry 250 

Termination of Employment 251 ' 

VOLUME 2 

Energy Act 

Exploration, Drilling and Production 252 

Fuel Oil Code 263 

Gas Utilization Code 254 

Propane Storage, Handling and Utihzation Code 255 

Spacing Units 

Arthur Pool 256 

Avonry Pool, Township of Sombra 257 

Bentpath Pool 258 

Clearville 259 

Colchester South. 260 

Courtright Pool 261 



TABLE OF REGULATIONS xix 

Energy Act — Continued REG. 
Spacing Units — Continued 

Dawn and Sombra (Townships of) 262 

Duncannon Pool 263 

Egremont (Township of) 264 

Gosfield South (Township of) 265 

Innerkip East Pool 266 

Innerkip Pool 267 

Ladysmith Pool 268 

Maiden (Township of) 269 

Moore (Township of) 270 

Otter Creek East Pool 271 

Otter Creek Pool 272 

Oxley Field 273 

Ruscom River Pool 274 

Terminus North Pool 275 

Terminus Pool 276 

Townsend Pool 277 

Verschoyle West Pool 278 

Willey Field 279 

Wilsonville Pool 280 

Wilsonville South Pool 281 

Transmission and Distributioa 282 

Transmission and Distribution Pipe Line Code. 283 

\ 
Escheats Act 

Fees 284 



Expropriations Act 

Forms , 285 

Rules of Practice and Procedure of the Land Compensation Board 286 



Family Benefits Act 

General 287 



Farm Products Containers Act 

Fruit and Vegetables 288 

Farm Products Grades and Sales Act 

Apples 

Cold Storage 289 

Christmas Trees 

Grades 290 

Dairy Products 291 

Flue-Cured Tobacco 292 

Fruit and Vegetables 

Grades 293 

Inspection 294 

Licences 295 

Grades for Beef and Veal 296 

Honey 297 

Maple Products 298 



XX TABLE OF REGULATIONS 

Farm Products Marketing Act Reg. 

Apples 

Plan 299 

Marketing 300 

Plan 301 

Transfer of Assets of Local Board 302 

Arbitration of Disputes 303 

Asparagus 

Plan 304 

Marketing 305 

Beans 

Plan 306 

Marketing 307 

Berries for Processing 

Plan 308 

Marketing 309 

Broiler Chickens 

Plan : 310 

Marketing 311 

By-laws for Local Boards 312 

Celery 

Plan 313 

Marketing 314 

Eggs and Fowl 

Plan 315 

Marketing 316 

Fresh Fruit 

Plan 317 

Marketing 318 

Fresh Grapes 

Plan 319 

Marketing 320 

Fresh Vegetables 

Plan 321 

Marketing 322 

Grapes for Processing 

Plan 323 

Marketing 324 

Greenhouse Vegetables 

Plan 325 

Marketing 326 

Hogs 

Plan 327 

Marketing 328 

Local Boards 329 

Onions 

Plan ^^ 

Marketing 331 

Seed-Corn 

Plan 332 

Marketing 333 

Soya-Beans 

Plan 334 

Marketing 335 

Sugar-Beets 

Plan 336 

Marketing 337 



» 



TABLE OF REGULATIONS xxi 

Farm Prod acts Marketing Act — Continued '^eg- 

Tender Fruit for Processing 

Plan 338 

Marketing 339 

Tobacco 

Plan 346 

Marketing 341 

Turkeys 

Plan 342 

Marketing 343 

Vegetables for Processing 

Plan 344 

Marketing 345 

Wheat 

Plan 346 

Marketing 347 

Farm Products Payments Act 

General 348 

Financial Administration Act 

Permit for Living Accommodation 349 

Retention and Disposal of Records 350 

Fire Departments Act 

Filing in Supreme Court of Decision of Arbitrator or Arbitration Board 351 

Standards for Pumpers 352 

Fire Marslials Act 

General 353 

Forest Fires Prevention Act 

Fire Districts 354 

Forestry Act 

Nurseries 355 

Freshwater Fish Marketing Act (Ontario) 

General 356 



Game and Fish Act 

Bobwhite Quail and Pheasant 

Propagation and Sale - 357 

Buffalo 358 

Bullfrogs 359 

Crown Game Preserves 360 

Designation of Class of Licence 361 

Discharge of Fire-Arms From or Across Highways and Roads 362 

Fire- Arms ^ 363 

Fishing Huts 364 

Fishing Licences 365 

Fur Royalties 366 

Furs 367 

Game Bird Hunting Preserves 368 

Guides 369 

Hunter Safety Training Courses 370 



xxii TABLE OF REGULATIONS 

Game and Fish Act — Continued REG. 
Hunting Licences 

Issuance 371 

Hunting on Crown Lands 

Geographic Townships of Bruton and Clyde . , 372 

Hunting on Designated Crown Land and in Provincial Parks 373 

Open Seasons 

Fur-Bearing Animals 374 

Permit to Export Game 375 

Sale of Bass and Trout 376 

Snares 377 

Trap-Line Areas 378 

Wolves in Captivity 379 

Gasoline Handling Act 

Gasohne Handling Code 380 

Gasoline Tax Act 

General 381 

General Welfare Assistance Act 

Dependent Fathers 3g2 

General 383 

Indian Bands 334 

Widows and Unmarried Women 335 

Grain Elevator Storage Act 

General 386 

Guarantee Companies Securities Act 

Approved Guarantee Companies 387 

H 

Health Services Insurance Act 

General 388 

Highway Improvement Act 

Designations 

Antrim to Quebec Boundary (Hwy. 417) 389 

Don Valley Parkway Extension (Hwy. 404) 390 

Homer to Queenston (Hwy. 405) 391 

London to Sarnia (Hwy. 402) 392 

Miscellaneous 

Northern Ontario 393 

Southern Ontario 394 

Queen Elizabeth Way 395 

Southwest Freeway — Ottawa (Hwy. 416) 396 

St. Catharines to Welland (Hwy. 406) 397 

Toronto to North Bay 398 

Toronto to Quebec Boundary (Hwy. 401) 399 

Toronto to Windsor (Hwy. 401) 400 

Toronto to Woodstock (Hwy. 403) 401 

Trans-Canada Highway 

Orillia to Manitoba Boundary 402 

Orillia to Quebec Boundary 403 

Woodbridge to Orono (Hwy. 407) 404 

Intersections in Unorganized Territory 405 

Permits 406 

Use of Rest, Service or Other Areas 407 



TABLE OF REGULATIONS xxiii 

Highway Traffic Act reg. 

Appeals 408 

Bicycles 409 

Certificate of Mechanical Fitness 410 

Construction Zones 411 

Dangerous Loads 412 

Demerit Point System 413 

Designations of Highways 414 

Driving Instructor's Licence 415 

Equipment 416 

Garage and Storage Licence 417 

General 418 

Gross Weight on Bridges 419 

Notice to Have Motor Vehicle Examined and Tested 420 

Parking 421 

Reciprocal Suspension of Licences 422 

Safety Helmets for Motorcycle Riders 423 

School Buses 424 

Signs 425 

Slow-Moving Vehicle Sign 426 

Special Permits 427 

Speed Limit 

Brock Road, City of Guelph. 428 

Speed Limits 429 

Speed Limits in Provincial Parks 430 

Speed Limits on Bridges 431 

Stop Signs at Intersections 432 

Tire Standards and Specifications 433 

Use of Controlled- Access Highways by Pedestrians 434 

Vehicle Safety 435 



VOLUME 3 

Hotnemakers and Nurses Services Act 

General 436 

Homes for Retarded Persons Act 

General 437 

Homes for Special Care Act 

General 438 

Homes for the Aged and Rest Homes Act 

General 439 

Hospital Labour Disputes Arbitration Act 

Remuneration of Chairman and Members of Board of Arbitration 440 

Rules of Procedure 441 

Hospital Services Commission Act 

Capital Grants for Schools for the Education of Hospital and Related Personnel 442 

General 443 

Insured Services 

Community Psychiatric Hospitals 444 

Loans for Residences for Student Nurses 445 

Nursing Homes for Chronic Care 446 

Premium Rates 447 



xxiv TABLE OF REGULATIONS 

Hotel Fire Safety Act Reg. 

General 448 

Hunter Damage Compensation Act 

General 449 

Hypnosis Act 

Application of Section 2 of Act 450 

I 

Income Tax Act 

Canadian Armed Forces 451 

General 452 

Industrial Safety Act 

Foundries. 453 

General 454 

Grain Elevators 455 

Industrial Standards Act 

Designation of Industries and Zones 456 

Duties of Employers and Advisory Committees 457 

Interprovincially Competitive Industries 458 

Schedule 

Barbering Industry 

Ajax 459 

Arnprior 460 

Aurora, Oak Ridges and Newmarket 461 

Aylmer 462 

Barrie 463 

Bracebridge, Gravenhurst, Huntsville 464 

Brantford 465 

Carleton Place. 466 

Cobourg 467 

Cornwall 468 

Essex County 469 

Gait 470 

Georgetown 471 

Guelph 472 

Hamilton 473 

Kent County 474 

Kitchener- Waterloo 475 

Londoa 476 

Niagara Falls 477 

Norfolk-Haldimand 478 

North Bay 479 

Oakville 480 

Orillia 481 

Oshawa 482 

Ottawa 483 

Owen Sound 484 

Paris ::..:... 485 

Pembroke 486 

Perth 487 

Peterborough 488 

Picton 489 

Port Colborne 490 

Prescott, Cardinal, Iroquois and Morrisburg 491 



TABLE OF REGULATIONS xxv 

Industrial Standards Act — Continued REG. 
Schedule — Continued 

Barbering Industry — Continued 

Renfrew 492 

St. Catharines 493 

St. Thomas 494 

Sarnia-Point Edward 495 

Sault Ste. Marie 496 

Smiths Falls 497 

Stoney Creek-Saltfleet 498 

Stratford 499 

Sudbury 500 

Thunder Bay 501 

Tillsonburg 502 

Welland 503 

Whitby. 504 

Woodstock 505 

Bricklaying and Stonemasonry Industry 

Hamilton 506 

Ottawa 507 

Sarnia 508 

Thunder Bay 509 

Toronto 510 

Carpentry Industry 

Hamilton 511 

Ottawa 512 

Windsor 513 

Common Labourers Construction Industry 

Windsor 514 

Electrical Repair and Construction Industry 

Ottawa 515 

St. Thomas 516 

Toronto 517 

Fur Industry 

Ontario. 518 

Ladies' Cloak and Suit Industry 

Ontario. , 519 

Ladies' Dress and Sportswear Industry 

Ontario 520 

Lathing Industry 

Ottawa 521 

Men's and Boys' Clothing Industry 

Ontario 522 

Men's and Boys' Hat and Cap Industry 

Ontario 523 

MilHnery Industry 

Ontario 524 

Painting and Decorating Industry 

Ottawa 525 

Thunder Bay 526 

Toronto 527 

Plastering Industry 

Ottawa 528 

Sarnia 529 

Sudbury 530 

Thunder Bay 531 

Toronto 532 

Windsor 533 



xxvi TABLE OF REGULATIONS 

Industrial Standards Act — Continued Reg. 
Schedule — Continued 

Plumbing and Heating Industry 

Ottawa. 534 

Toronto 535 

Windsor 536 

Sheet-Metal Work Construction Industry 

Ottawa 537 

Windsor 538 

Insurance Act 

Agents' Licences for Insurance other than Life Insurance 539 

Extension of Provisions of Act ^ 540 

General 541 

Order under paragraph 1 of subsection 2 of section 83 of the Act 542 

Variable Contracts of Life Insurers 543 

Invejtment Contracts Act 

Registration 544 



Judicature Act and Matrimonial Causes Act 

Rules of Practice 545 

Judicature Act 

Stenographic Reporters 546 

Junior Farmer Establishment Act 

Application for Bank Loan 547 

General 548 



Labour Relations Act 

General 549 

Office of the Board 550 

Rules of Procedure. 551 

Land Titles Act 

Code of Standards and Procedure for Surveys and Plans 552 

General 553 

Land Titles Divisions 554 

Microfilming of Land Titles Records 555 

Law Society Act 

Admission of Members 

General 556 

Legal Aid Act 

General 557 

Legislative Assembly Retirement Allowances Act 

Table 558 

Lightning Rods Act 

General 559 



TABLE OF REGULATIONS xxvii 

Liquor Control Act REG. 

General 560 

Negotiation and Arbitration Procedures 561 

Liquor Licence Act 

Fees on Votes and Licensing Districts 562 

General 563 

Votes 564 

Live Stock and Live Stock Products Act 

Eggs 565 

Hogs 566 

Wool 567 

Live Stock Community Sales Act 

General 568 

Loan and Trust Corporations Act 

Approved Trust Companies 569 

Common Trust Funds 570 

Local Roads Boards Act 

Establishment of Local Roads Areas 571 

General 572 

Loggers' Safety Act 

General 573 

M 

Meat Inspection Act (Ontario) 

General 574 

Mechanics' Lien Act 

Forms 575 

Mental Health Act 

Application of Act 576 

Grants 577 

Mental Hospitals Act 

General 578 

Residential Units 579 

Milk Act 

By-laws for Marketing Boards 580 

Cheese 

Marketing 581 

Marketing 582 

Classes of Milk 583 

Concentrated Milk 

Plan 584 

Cream for Processing 

Plan 585 

Marketing 586 

Designation of Grade A Milk and Industrial Milk 587 

Designations 

Milk Products 588 



xxviii TABLE OF REGULATIONS 

Milk Act — Continued reg. 

Fluid Milk Products 

Designation, Containers and Labelling 589 

Grade A Milk 

General 590 

Marketing 591 

Producers. 592 

Industrial Milk 

Marketing 593 

Marketing Boards 594 

Milk 

Marketing 595 

Milk Marketing 

Classes 3, 4, 5 and 6 5% 

Milk and Cheese 

Plan 597 

Milk 

Transportation 598 

Milk Producers 

Licences 599 

Milk Products 600 

Purchase and Sale of Milk for Northern Ontario Pool 601 

Reconstituted Milk 

General 602 



Mining Act 

Exploratory Licences and Leases for Oil and Natural Gas in Lower Great Lakes 603 

Exploratory Licences and Leases for Oil and Natural Gas North of the Fifty-First 

Parallel of Latitude 604 

Forms 605 

Mining Divisions. 606 

Refinery Licences 607 

Sale of Rights to Explore for Minerals 608 

Surveys of Mining Claims 609 

Mortgage Brokers Registration Act 

General 610 

Mortmain and Charitable Uses Act 

Licences and Fees 611 



Motor Vehicle Accident Claims Act 

General 612 

Motor Vehicle Fuel Tax Act 

Exemptions 613 



Motorized Snow Vehicles Act 

General 614 



Municipal Act 

Designation of Municipalities 615 

Designation of Universities 616 

Pension Plan for Municipal Employees 617 



TABLE OF REGULATIONS xxix 

N REO. 

Niagara Escarpment Protection Act 

Application of Act 

Permits 618 

Niagara Parks Act 

GeneraL 619 

Notaries Act 

Fees 620 

Nurses Act 

GeneraL 621 

Nursing Homes Act 

GeneraL 622 



O 

Official Notices Publication Act 

Rates 623 

Old Age Assistance Act 

GeneraL 624 

Oleomargarine Act 

GeneraL 625 

Ontario Energy Board Act 

GeneraL 626 

Rules of Procedure. 627 

Uniform System of Accounts for Gas Utilities Class A 628 

Ontario Food Terminal Act 

Composition of Board ; 629 

Conduct of Business 630 

Procedure of the Board 631 

Ontario Highway Transport Board Act 

Rules of Procedure 632 

Ontario Human Rights Code 

Form of Complaint 633 

Ontario Institute for Studies in Education Act 

GeneraL 634 

Ontario Labour- Management Arbitration Commission Act 

GeneraL 635 

Ontario Municipal Board Act 

Composition of Board 636 

Procedure 637 

Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement System Act 

GeneraL 638 



XXX TABLE OF REGULATIONS 

Ontario Municipal Improvement Corporation Act ^^^ 

Procedure 639 

Ontario Producers, Processors, Distributors and Consumers Food Council Act 

Designations of Products 640 

Ontario School Trustees Council Act 

Composition of Council 641 

Ontario Telephone Development Corporation Act 

Composition of Corporation 642 

Ontario Universities Capital Aid Corporation Act 

Designated Universities 643 

Ontario Water Resources Commission Act 

Discharge of Sewage from Pleasure Boats 644 

Exemptions from Section 38 645 

Marinas 646 

Plumbing Code 647 

Water Wells 648 

Operating Engineers Act 

General 649 

Opththalmic Dispensers Act 

General 650 

Optometry Act 

General 651 

P 

Parks Assistance Act 

General 652 

Partnerships Registration Act 

General 653 

Pension Benefits Act 

General 654 

Personal Property Security Act 

Branch Offices 655 

Fees Concerning Security Agreements 656 

Pesticides Act 

General 657 

Pharmacy Act 

Labelling 658 

Registration and Apprenticeship 659 

Sale of Drugs 660 

Standards for Maintenance and Operation of Pharmacies 661 

Planning Act 

Restricted Areas 

Blind River 662 

County of Haliburton, Township of Cardiff 663 



TABLE OF REGULATIONS xxxi 

Planning Act— Continued REG. 

Restricted Areas — Continued 

District of Kenora, Patricia Portion 664 

District of Kenora, Patricia Portion 665 

District of Nipissing, Township of Strathy 666 

District of Temagami 667 

Districts of Nipissing and Timiskaming 668 

Kapuskasing ' . . . 669 

Regional Area of Ottawa-Carleton, Township of Fitzroy 670 

Teck Township, Englehart Area 671 

Rules of Procedure 672 

Subdivision Control 673 

Zoning Order 

County of Essex, Township of Tilbury North 674 

County of Simcoe, Township of Nottawasaga 675 

District of Sudbury, Geographic Townships of Broder and Dill 676 

Plant Diseases Act 

General 677 



VOLUME 4 

Police Act 

Arbitration 678 

Equipment 679 

General 680 

Responsibility of Policing 681 

Power Commission Act 

Conversion to Sixty Cycles 682 

Electrical Safety Code 683 

Fees 684 

Pension and Insurance Plan 685 

Water Heaters 686 

Prearranged Funeral Services Act 

Trust Accounts 687 

Pregnant Mare Urine Farms Act 

General 688 

Private Hospitals Act 

General 689 

Private Investigators and Security Guards Act 

General 690 

Professional Engineers Act 

General 691 

Provincial Courts Act 

General 692 

Remuneration of Judges 693 

Provincial Land Tax Act 

General 694 



xxxii TABLE OF REGULATIONS 

Provincial Parks Act REG. 

Designation of Parks 695 

General 6% 

Guides in Quetico Provincial Park 697 

Psychologists Registration Act 

General 698 

Public Commercial Vehicles Act 

Carrying Goods in Bond 699 

General 7W 

Public Health Act 

Camps in Unorganized Territory 7§1 

Capital Grants for Community Health Facilities 702 

Communicable Diseases 703 

Community Health Services 704 

Designation of Human Ailments 705 

Food Premises ; 706 

Frosted-Food Locker Plants. 707 

Grants 708 

Grants to Boards of Health 709 

Health Units 

Areas that may be included in Health Units 710 

General 711 

Indigent Patients 712 

Pasteurization Areas 713 

Pasteurization Plants 714 

Plumbing in Unorganized Territory 715 

Public Swimming Pools. 716 

Qualifications of Medical Officers of Health, Sanitary Inspectors and Public Health 

Nurses 717 

Sanitary Code for Unorganized Territory 718 

Slaughter-Houses and Meat Processing Plants 719 

Summer Camps 720 

X-Ray Safety 721 

Public Hospitals Act 

Capital Financial Assistance for Hospital Construction and Renovation 722 

Capital Grants for Ambulance Facilities 723 

Capital Grants for Regional Rehabilitation Hospitals 724 

Capital Grants for Teaching Hospitals 725 

Classification of Hospitals 726 

Grants 

Capital 727 

Maintenance 728 

Hospital Management 729 

Public Lands Act 

Hunting by Aircraft 730 

Restricted Areas 

District of Algoma 731 

District of Cochrane 732 

District of Cochrane-Devitt, Eilber, McCowan, Barker, McCrea and Idington .... 733 

District of Cochrane, Townships of Fournier, Lamarche, Clute and Hanna 734 

District of Kenora 735 

District of Kenora, Patricia Portion 736 

District of Sudbury 737 



TABLE OF REGULATIONS xxxiii 

Public Lands Act — Continued REG. 
Restricted Areas — Continued 
District of Sudbury 

Townships of Cochrane, Chapleau, Gallagher. Panet, Tp. 28 and Tp. 29 738 

Townships of Wakami and Tp. 22 739 

District of Thunder Bay 740 

District of Thunder Bay 741 

District of Thunder Bay 

Townships of Blackwell, Conacher, Forbes, Goldie, Hagey, Haines, Laurie and 

the Dawson Road Lots 742 

District of Timiskaming 743 

Districts of Cochrane and Timiskaming 744 

Districts of Timiskaming and Nipissing 745 

District of Cochrane, Part of 746 

Sale of Public Lands 747 

Public Libraries Act 

General 748 

Public Service Act 

General 749 

Joint Council 760 

Joint Council 751 

Joint Council 752 

Joint Council 753 

Joint Council 754 

Joint Council 755 

Overtime, Ontario Provincial Police 756 

Stand-By, Ontario Provincial Police Force 757 

The Ontario Provincial Police Negotiating and Arbitration Committees 758 

Vacations, Ontario Provincial Police 759 

Public Service Superannuation Act 

General 760 

Public Trustee Act 

General 761 

Public Vehicles Act 

General 762 

Public Works Creditors Payment Act 

Notice of Claim 763 

Time for Notice of Claim 764 



Race Tracks Tax Act 

Rate of Tax 765 

Radiological Technicians Act 

General 766 

Railway Fire Charge Act 

Charges for Fire Protection 767 

Regional Municipality of York Act 

Appointment of Clerk, Treasurer, Engineer or Auditor 768 



xxxiv TABLE OF REGULATIONS 

Real Estate and Business Brokers Act REG. 

Genera] 769 

Reciprocal Enforcement of Judgments Act 

Application of Act 770 

Reciprocal Enforcement of Maintenance Orders Act 

Reciprocating States 771 

Regional Municipality of Niagara Act 

Financial Adjustments 772 

Order of the Minister 773 

Registry Act 

Canada Lands 774 

Corporations Exempted Under Section 43 of the Act 775 

Fees 776 

Forms and Records 777 

Microfilming of Registry Records 778 

Registry Divisions 779 

Surveys, Plans and Descriptions of Land 780 

Regulations Act 

General 781 

Residential Property Tax Reduction Act 

Reduction in Rent to Tenants 782 

Tax Reduction in Respect of Residential Properties 783 

Retail Sales Tax Act 

Definitions by Minister 784 

General 785 

S 

St. Clair Parkway Commission Act 

General 786 

St. Lawrence Parks Commission Act 

Controlled Access Highways 787 

Highway Vested in the Commission 788 

Parks 789 

Sanatoria for Consumptives Act 

General 790 

Tuberculosis Control Clinics 791 

Secondary Schools and Boards of Education Act 

Apportionment 1970 Requisitions 792 

Designation of School Divisions in Territorial Districts 793 

Securities Act 

General 794 

Security Transfer Tax Act 

General 795 

Seed Potatoes Act 

General 796 



TABLE OF REGULATIONS xxxv 

Separate Schools Act Reg. 

County Combined Separate School Zone? 797 

District Combined Separate School Zones 798 

Silicosis Act 

General 799 

Small Claims Courts Act 

Courts 800 

Rules of Procedure 801 

Tariff of Fees 802 

Stock Yards Act 

Management 803 

Succession Duty Act 

General 804 

Summary Convictions Act 

Traffic Ticket 805 

Surrogate Courts Act 

Rules of Practice 806 

Surveys Act 

Monuments 807 

Survey Methods 808 

The Ontario Co-ordinate System 809 

T 

Teachers' Superannuation Act 

General 810 

Theatres Act 

General 811 

Tobacco Tax Act 

General 812 

Toll Bridges Act 

General 813 

Trade Schools Regulation Act 

General 814 

Training Schools Act 

General 815 

Trench Excavators' Protection Act 

General 816 

U 

Upholstered and Stuffed Articles Act 

General 817 

Used Car Dealers Act 

General 818 



xxxvi TABLE OF REGULATIONS 

V REG. 

Venereal Diseases Prevention Act 

General 819 

Vital Statistics Act 

General 820 

Vocational Rehabilitation Services Act 

General 821 

Voters* Lists Act 

General 822 

W 

Warble Fly Control Act 

General 823 

Waste Management Act 

General 824 

Weed Control Act 

General 825 

Welfare Units Act 

General 826 

Wild Rice Harvesting Act 

General 827 

Wilderness Areas Act 

Wilderness Areas 828 

Wolf and Bear Bounty Act 

Bounties 829 

Wolves or Bears in Captivity 830 

Women's Equal Employment Opportunity Act 

Forms 831 

Woodlands Improvement Act 

General 832 

Workmen's Compensation Act 

First- Aid Requirements 833 

General 834 

Pension Plan 835 



Reg. 1 



ABANDONED ORCHARDS 



REGULATION 1 

under The Abandoned Orchards Act 



GENERAL 

1. — (1) A certificate designating an orchard as a 
neglected orchard shall be in Form 1 . 

(2) A revocation of a certificate in Form 1 shall 
be in Form 2. 

(3) A notice of appeal shall be in Form 3. O. Reg. 
158/67. s. 1. 

2. — (1) Where the Provincial Entomologist 
receives information from any person that an 
orchard may come within the application of section 
4 of the Act, he shall, 

(a) inspect the orchard ; or 

(6) direct an inspector to inspect the orchard. 

(2) Where an inspector has inspected an orchard 
pursuant to subsection 1, he shall submit a report 
thereon to the Provincial Entomologist. O. Reg. 
158/67, s. 2. 

3. The trees, shrubs or vines set out in Schedule 
1 are designated for the purposes of clause h of 
section 7 of the Act. O. Reg. 158/67, s. 3. 

Schedule 1 

1. Hawthorn, 
2. Wild plum. O. Reg. 158/67, Sched. 1. 

Form 1 

The Abandoned Orchards Act 
CERTIFICATE 



No. 
To: 



(owner as shown on last revised assessment roll) 

(address) 

Take notice that I have designated the orchard 

located on , 

(lot or part of lot) 

in the 



(concession or plan) 

of , in the 



(county or district) 



of as a neglected orchard pur- 
suant to subsection 1 of section 4 of The A handoned 
Orchards Act. 

Further take notice that subsection 1 of section 6 
of the said Act provides as follows : 

6. — (1) Where the owner of or any person having 
an interest in an orchard considers himself aggrieved 
by a certificate of the Provincial Entomologist 
designating the orchard as a neglected orchard 
under section 4, he may appeal against the 
certificate by delivering a notice of appeal to the 
Provincial Entomologist within fifteen days after 
service of the certificate under clause h of subsection 
2 of section 4. 



(Provincial Entomologist) 
Dated at , this day of , 

19 O. Reg. 158/67, Form 1; O. Reg. 204/67, 

s. 1. 

Form 2 

The Abandoned Orchards Act 

Certificate No is hereby revoked. 



(Provincial Entomologist) 

Dated at , this day of 

19 O. Reg. 158/67, Form 2. 

Form 3 

The A bandoned Orchards A ct 

NOTICE OF APPEAL 

To: The Provincial Entomologist, 
University of Guelph, 
Guelph, Ontario. 

I hereby appeal against Certificate No 

dated the day of ,19 



(signature of appellant) 



(address) 

Dated at , this day of 

19 O. Reg. 158/67, Form 3. 



Reg. 2 ACTIVE SERVICE MORATORIUM 



REGULATION 2 

under The Active Service Moratorium Act, 1943 

^ 

APPLICATION 

f 1. An application shall be in Form 1. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 1, s.l. 

f 



Form 1 

The Active Service Moratorium Act, 1943 

APPLICATION 

In the Matter of an action or proceeding in the 

Court of 

Between : 

(Mortgagee or Vendor) 

and 

(Mortgagor or Purchaser or Guarantor) 

I. , 

of the of in the County of 

apply for a stay (or a postponement) of the action or proceeding. 

I am a member of (or, I am a dependant of 

(Give full name of member) 

who is a member of) 

Branch of service of the member of the forces 

Rank No Date of enlistment 

Address of member while on service 

The following are the particulars : 

1 . Location of property in question 

2. Nature of property (residential, business or farm) 

3. Name of present owner of property 

4. State whether the member of the forces is Hable as purchaser, mortgagor or guarantor 



5. Date of purchase of property 



ACTIVE SERVICE MORATORIUM Reg. 2 



6. Amount of purchase price $ Cash payment $ 

7. Present value of property $ 

8. If proceeding is on a mortgage, date of mortgage 

9. Original amount of mortgage $ Rate of interest ... 

10. Amount of principal now outstanding $ 

1 1 . Amount of principal overdue $ 

12. Amount of interest overdue $ 

13. When was last payment made on either principal or interest ? 

Amount paid $ 

14. Amount of yearly taxes on property $ 

15. Arrears of taxes (if any) $ ; 

16. Amount for which buildings insured $ 

17. Are insurance premiums in arrears ? 

18. Particulars of any other mortgage, lien, charge, execution or other encumbrance 



19. Is the mortgage or purchase agreement in question the first charge: 



20. Who are the present occupants of the property i 



21. Is this the ordinary residence of the member of the forces ? 

22. If any business or trade or farming is carried on upon the premises, what is its nature, and by whom is it 
carried on ? 

23. Is the property, or any part of it, rented ? 

24. What is the rental ? 

25. Is rent in arrears and, if so, for how long ? 

26. What was the occupation of the member of the forces prior to enlistment ? 

27. What was his income prior to enhstment, with particulars ? 



28. Rate of pay of the member of the forces per month, including all allowances $ 

29. Amount of pay assigned $ 

30. Amount of separation or dependant's allowances, including children's allowances, per month $. 

31 . Other income, if any, of dependants, with particulars 



Reg. 2 ACTIVE SERVICE MORATORIUM 

32. Other income, if any, of the member of the forces, with particulars. 



33. If appHcant is a dependant, state relationship and occupation, if any, of dependant 

34. Does apphcant, if a dependant, actually reside upon the property in question? 

35. If applicant is a guarantor, and not the person primarily liable, state nature of his interest and liability 



36. What is the nature of the action or proceeding commenced or continued ? 

37. In what court is the action or proceeding ? 

38. When was the action or proceeding commenced ? 

39. On what terms and conditions is relief asked ? 



40. Will periodical or other payment be made on account and, if so, how much $ 

41. For what period is a stay or postponement of the action or proceeding requested? 

42. If the applicant is a dependant, give address 



43. Statement of assets : (This shall include chattels of all kinds, cash in bank, securities and any property of 
any kind) 



(a) Of the member of the forces 



{b) of the dependant 



Dated at this day of , 19 . 



(signature of applicant) 



ACTIVE SERVICE MORATORIUM 



Reg. 2 



AFFIDAVIT VERIFYING APPLICATION 



(name of applicant) 

named in the within application, make oath and say that the facts set out herein are to the best of my knowledge 
and belief true. 

Sworn before me at the 

of in the 

of 

this day of , 

19 

A Commissioner for taking aflftdavits. 



This application should be presented to the judge of the county or district court except in the 
Judicial Districts of York and Ottawa-Carleton where it shall be presented to the Master and local 
Master respectively. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 1, Form 1, revised. 



Reg. 3 



ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE 



REGULATION 3 

under The Administration of Justice Act 



FEES AND EXPENSES— GEJ^ERAL 

1. Persons who perform the under-mentioned 
services in connection with the administration of 
justice and who are not in receipt of a salary for 
employment in the service of the Crown in right of 
Ontario shall be paid the following fees : 

1. Sheriff's Officers and Process Servers — 

The serving of any writ, subpoena, notice, 
pleading or other paper 

for each party served $ 1.50 

2. Escorts — 

Conveying prisoners to a peniten- 
tiary or to another jurisdiction or a 
juvenile to a training school, per 
diem 15.00 

3. Constables — 

(a) summoning a jury for cor- 
oner's inquest, including 
attendance at inquest 8.00 

(b) attending each adjournment 

of coroner's inquest 4.00 

4. Shorthand Court Reporters — 

(a) holders of a Chartered Short- 
hand Reporters' Association 
of Ontario Certificate of Qual- 
ification — 

per hour 7.00 

maximum per diem. . . 35.00 

{b) others — 

per hour 5.00 

maximum per diem. . . 25.00 
O.Reg.391/68.s.l. 

2. Disbursements actually and necessarily in- 
curred while in attendance upon a judge of the 
Supreme Court when holding a sitting of the Supreme 
Court or incurred in the execution of his order shall 
be paid by the Sheriff out of the monies provided 
by the Legislature for the maintenance of county, 
district and small claims courts. O. Reg. 391/68, s. 2. 



3. — ( 1 ) Mileage allowance for executing a warrant, 
serving a writ, subpoena, notice, pleading or other 
paper, per mile actually travelled one way shall be, 

{a) in northern Ontario, 25 cents; and 

{b) in southern Ontario, 20 cents. 

(2) Persons conveying prisoners to a penitentiary 
or another jurisdiction or escorting a juvenile to a 
training school shall receive the reimbursement of 
actual Hving expenses and, 

{a) where public conveyance is used, the actual 
travelling expenses ; or 

{b) where a private conveyance is used, a 
mileage allowance for each mile actually 
travelled one way, 

(i) in northern Ontario, 25 cents, and 

(ii) in southern Ontario, 20 cents. 

(3) Where a constable attending coroner's in- 
quest or a court reporter who is not in receipt of a 
salary for employment in the service of the Crown 
in right of Ontario is required in the performance 
of his duties to attend at a location that is not in 
the community in which he ordinarily resides, he 
shall be paid a mileage allowance for each mile actually 
travelled one way from his residence, 

(a) in northern Ontario, 25 cents; and 

{b) in southern Ontario, 20 cents. 

(4) For the purpose of this section, the dividing 
line between northern Ontario and southern Ontario 
is as follows : 

Healy Lake (Municipal) Road from Healy 
Lake easterly to its junction with Highway 
612; Highway 612 to Highway 103; High- 
way 103 easterly to its junction with High- 
way 69 ; Highway 69 easterly to its junction 
with Highway 118; Highway 118 through 
Bracebridge to its junction with High- 
way 11 ; Highway 11 northerly to its junc- 
tion with Highway 60 at Huntsville; 
Highway 60 easterly to its junction with 
Highway 62 at Killaloe Station; High- 
way 62 to Pembroke; the above-named 
highways to be included in southern Ontario. 
O. Reg. 391/68, s. 3. 



ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE 



Reg. 4 



REGULATION 4 

under The Administration of Justice Act 



FEES AND EXPENSES- 
JUSTICES OF THE PEACE 

1. A Justice of the Peace who is not in receipt of a 
salary for employment in the service of the Crown 
in right of Ontario shall be paid the following fees : 

1. Swearing information, 

(a) information portion of traffic 
ticket $ .50 

(b) information for search 
warrant 50 

(c) all other informations 1.00 

2. Issuring search warrant 50 

3. Issuing summons to accused or 
warrant (other than search warrant) . .50 

4. Copy of summons to accused or 
warrant (including search warrant) . .30 

5. Warrant where summons to accused 
issued in the first instance 50 

6. Issuing subpoena (one per case) to 
witnesses, unless the Justice of the 
Peace or the Court considers it neces- 
sary or desirable to issue more than 

one 50 

7. Copy of subpoena or copy of warrant 

for a witness 30 

8. Attending to remand a prisoner (in- 
cluding preparation and completion 

of warrant or remand) 1.00 

9. Attending to take recognizance of 
bail (including preparation and com- 
pletion of recognizance and copies) . 2.00 

10. Presiding in court at the direction of 
a judge or provincial judge to ad- 
journ cases which are ordinarily 
heard by a judge or provincial judge 

— per sitting 5.00 

1 1 . Presiding in court at the direction of 
a judge or provincial judge to hear 
and determine prosecutions — per 
sitting 20.00 

Where a sitting exceeds 2 hours, an 
additional fee of $10 may be allowed 
at the discretion of a judge or pro- 
vincial judge. 



12. Preparing a record of conviction or 
order upon the request of a party to 

the proceedings 1.00 

13. Copy of a writing other than a con- 
viction or order upon the request of a 
party to the proceedings, per page. 1.50 

14. Bill of costs, when made out in detail 
upon the request of a party to the 
proceedings 50 

15. Attending to take any recognizance 
other than a recognizance of bail (in- 
cluding preparation and completion 

of recognizances and copies) 2.00 

O. Reg. 392/68, s. 1. 

2. — (1) A Justice of the Peace who is in receipt 
of a salary for employment, other than a full-time 
position of Justice of the Peace, in the service of the 
Crown in right of Ontario, shall be paid fees as set 
out in section 1 and a mileage allowance as set out 
in subsection 1 of section 3 upon a certificate of a 
judge or a provincial judge, for services performed as a 
Justice of the Peace outside of normal working hours. 

(2) A Justice of the Peace to whom subsection 1 
applies shall pay to the Treasurer of Ontario all fees 
collected by him as a Justice of the Peace during 
normal working hours. 

(3) Normal working hours for the purposes of this 
section shall be 8.30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily from 
Monday through Friday, excepting annual vacation 
and statutory holidays. O. Reg. 392/68, s. 2. 

3. — (1) Where a Justice of the Peace is required 
in the performance of his duties, 

(a) to attend to remand a prisoner ; 

{b) to attend to take recognizance of bail; 

(c) to preside in court at the direction of a judge 
or provincial judge to adjourn cases that are 
ordinarily heard by a judge or provincial 
judge; 

(d) to preside in court at the direction of a 
judge or provincial judge to hear and deter- 
mine prosecutions ; or 

{e) to attend to take any recognizance other 
than a recognizance of bail, 

at a location that is not in the community in which 
he ordinarily resides, he shall be paid a mileage 
allowance for each mile actually travelled one way 
from his residence. 



Reg. 4 



ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE 



(/) in northern Ontario, 25 cents; and 

{g) in southern Ontario, 20 cents. 

(2) For the purposes of this section, the dividing 
line between northern and southern Ontario is as 
follows : 

Healy Lake (Municipal) Road from Healy 
Lake easterly to its junction with Highway 
612; Highway 612 to Highway 103; High- 



way 103 easterly to its junction with High- 
way 69 ; Highway 69 easterly to its junction 
with Highway 118; Highway 118 through 
Bracebridge to its junction with Highway 
11; Highway 11 northerly to its junction 
with Highway 60 at Huntsville; Highway 
60 easterly to its junction with Highway 62 
at Killaloe Station; Highway 62 to Pem- 
broke ; the above-named highways to be in- 
cluded in southern Ontario. O. Reg. 
392/68, s. 3. 



Reg. 5 



AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATIONS 



11 



REGULATION 5 

under The Agricultural Associations Act 

DESIGNATION OF ASSOCIATIONS 



1. Each of the associations, societies, institutes 
or organizations named in the Schedule is designated 
an association, society, institute or organization 
under section 2 of the Act. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 2, 



Schedule 

1. The Farm Safety Council of Ontario. 

2. The Federated Women's Institutes of Ontario. 

3. The Ontario Association of Community Sale 
Operators. 

4. The Ontario Beef-cattle Improvement Asso- 
ciation. 

5. The Ontario Beef Improvement Association. 

6. The Ontario Beef Producers' Association. 

7. The Ontario Cattle Breeders' Association. 



8. The Ontario Hatcheries Association. 

9. The Ontario Live Stock Protective Association. 

10. The Ontario Live Stock Shippers' Association. 

11. The Ontario Poultry Breeders' Association. 

12. The Ontario Sheep Breeders' and Producers' 
Association. 

13. The Ontario Soil and Crop Improvement Asso- 
ciation. 

14. The Ontario Swine Improvement Council. 

15. The Ontario Turkey Association. 

16. The South-western Ontario Live Stock Pro- 
ducers' Association. 

17. The Strawberry Council of Ontario. 

18. The Red Cherry Institute. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 
2, Sched.; O. Reg. 260/61, s. 1 ; O. Reg. 14/63, 
s. 1; O. Reg. 118/63, s. 1 ; O. Reg. 440/67, s. 1; 
O. Reg. 425/68, s. 1. 



Reg. 6 AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT 13 



REGULATION 6 

under The Agricultural Development Act 

INTEREST ON LOANS 

1. The interest accruing since the 1st day of December, 1934 on all loans made under the Act shall be 
computed at 4 per cent a year. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 4, s. 1. 



Reg. 7 



AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCE 



15 



REGULATION 7 

under The Agricultural Development Finance Act 



DEPOSITS 

1. — (1) Subject to subsection 2, interest at the 
rate of 6 per cent per annum calculated on 
the minimum monthly balance shall be paid on the 
last days of March and September in each year. 

(2) In special cases, the Minister of Revenue may 
determine a rate of interest and basis of calcula- 
tion different from that prescribed in subsection 1, 



but the rate so determined shall not exceed 6 per 
cent per annum. O. Reg. 463/70, s. 1. 

2. Repayment of deposits shall be made from the 
office known as "The Province of Ontario Savings 
Office", 

(a) to the depositor in person on demand ; or 

(b) to the order of the depositor. R.R.O. 1960, 
Reg. 5, s. 2; O.Reg. 107/68, s. 2. 



Reg. 8 



AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES 



17 



REGULATION 8 

under The Agricultural Societies Act 



GENERAL 

INTERPRETATION 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "major undertaking" means the construc- 
tion of a building or structure on the 
premises of a society, costing in the case 
of a society of, 

(i) Class A, more than $6,000, 

(ii) Class B, more than $3,600, and 

(iii) Class C, more than $2,400; 

(b) "specified exhibits" means exhibits shown 
by exhibitors for cash prizes at an exhibi- 
tion or fair of horses other than horses in 
races or special events, cattle, sheep, swine, 
poultry, seeds, fruit, flowers, potatoes, 
vegetables, grain, honey, dairy products, 
clothing, home-processed foods, arts, crafts, 
photography and handicrafts and work per- 
formed by school pupils and members of 
Junior Farmer associations and 4-H clubs. 
R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 6, s. 1. 

CLASSIFICATION OF SOCIETIES 

2. Societies are classified as follows: 

1. Class A, consisting of societies that in each 
of the three years immediately preceding 
the date of classification paid to exhibitors 
on specified exhibits at least $6,000. 

2. Class B, consisting of societies that are not 
Class A societies and that in each of the 
three years immediately preceding the date 
of classification paid to exhibitors on speci- 
fied exhibits at least $3,000. 

3. Class C, consisting of societies that are not 
Class A or Class B societies. R.R.O. 1960, 
Reg. 6, s. 2. 

DESIGNATION OF SOCIETIES 

3. — (1) The following societies are designated as 
Class A societies : 

1 . The Canadian National Exhibition Associa- 
tion, Toronto. 

2. The Central Canada Exhibition Association, 
Ottawa. 



3. The Norfolk County Agricultural Society, 
Simcoe. 

4. The Peterborough Industrial Society, Peter- 
borough. 

5. The Burford Agricultural Society. 

6. The South Waterloo Agricultural Society, 
Gait. 

7. The Welland County Agricultural Society, 
Welland. 

8. The Western Fair Association, London. 
R.R.O. 1960. Reg. 6, s. 3(1). 

(2) The following societies are designated as Class 
B societies : 

1. The Ancaster Agricultural Society, 
Ancaster. 

2. The Aylmer and East Elgin Agricultural 
Society, Aylmer. 

3. The Barrie Agricultural Society, Barrie. 

4. The Beeton Agricultural Society. 

5. The Belleville Agricultural Society, Belle- 
ville. 

6. The Caledonia Agricultural Society, 
Caledonia. 

7. The Canadian Lakehead Agricultural 
Society, Fort William-Port Arthur. 

8. The Carp Agricultural Society, Carp. 

9. The County of Carleton Agricultural 
Society, Richmond. 

10. The Cumberland Township Agricultural 
Society. 

11. The Dresden Agricultural Society, Dresden. 

12. The Dufferin Agricultural Society, Orange- 
ville. 

13. The East Peterborough Agricultural 
Society, Norwood. 

14. The Elmira and Woolwich Agricultural 
Society, Elmira. 

15. The Erin Agricultural Society, Erin. 



18 



AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES 



Reg. 8 



16. The Halton County Agricultural Society, 
Milton. 

17. The Kenyon Agricultural Society, Maxville. 

18. The Kingston Industrial Agricultural So- 
ciety, Kingston. 

19. The Leamington District Agricultural So- 
ciety, Leamington. 

20. The Lennox Agricultural Society, Napanee. 

21. The Lincoln Agricultural Society, Beams- 
ville. 

22. The London Township Agricultural Society. 

23. The Markham and East York Agricultural 
Society, Markham. 

24. The Metcalfe Agricultural Society, Metcalfe. 

25. The Mitchell Agricultural Society, Mitchell. 

26. The Moore Agricultural Society, Brigden. 

27. The North Lanark Agricultural Society. 

28. The North Wentworth Agricultural Society, 
Rockton. 

29. The Nottawasaga Agricultural Society, 
CoUingwood. 

30. The Owen Sound Agricultural Society, 
Owen Sound. 

31. The Paris Agricultural Society, Paris. 
32. 
33. 



The Peel County Agricultural Society, 
Brampton. 



The Petrolia and Enniskellen Agricultural 

Society. 



34. The Prince Edward County Agricultural 
Society, Picton. 

35. The Ridgetown District Agricultural 
Society, Ridgetown. 

36. The Seaforth Agricultural Society, Seaforth. 

37. The South Ontario Agricultural Society, 
Oshawa. 

38. The South Renfrew Agricultural Society, 
Renfrew. 

39. The Stratford Agricultural Society, 
Stratford. 

40. The Strathroy Agricultural Society, 
Strathroy. 



41. The Tees water Agricultural Society, Tees- 
water. 

42. The Walkerton Agricultural Society, 
Walkerton. 

43. The Woodbridge Agricultural Society, 
Woodbridge. 

44. The Woodstock Agricultural Society, 
Woodstock. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 6, s. 3(2) ; 
O. Reg. 65/62, s. 1(1). 

(3) The following societies are designated as Class 
C societies : 

DISTRICT OF ALGOMA 

1. The Bruce Mines Agricultural Society. 

2. The Iron Bridge Agricultural Society. 

3. The Thessalon Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF BRANT 

4. The Ohsweken Agricultural Society. 

5. The South Brant Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF BRUCE 

6. The Arran-Tara Agricultural Society. 

7. The Carrick Agricultural Society. 

8. The Chesley Agricultural Society. 

9. The Eastnor Agricultural Society. 

10. The Huron Township Agricultural Society. 

11. The Kincardine Agricultural Society. 

12. The Lucknow Agricultural Society. 

13. The North Bruce and Saugeen Agricultural 
Society. 

14. The Paisley Agricultural Society. 

15. The Tiverton Agricultural Society. 

16. The Wiarton Agricultural Society. 

DISTRICT OF COCHRANE 

17. The Clute Agricultural Society. 

18. The Cochrane Agricultural Society. 

19. The Hearst Agricultural Society. 

20. The Matheson Agricultural Society. 



Reg. 8 



AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES 



19 



21. The Porcupine District Agricultural 
Society. 

22. The Porquis Junction Agricultural Society. 

23. The Val Gagne Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF DUFFERIN 

24. The Dufferin Central Agricultural Society. 

25. The East Luther Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF DUNDAS 

26. The Chesterville and District Agricultural 
Society. 

27. The Mountain Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF DURHAM 

28. The Cartwright Agricultural Society. 

29. The Durham Central Agricultural Society. 

30. The Millbrook Agricultural Society. 
3L The Port Hope Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF ELGIN 

32. The Aldborough Agricultural Society. 

33. The Southwold and Dunwich Agricultural 
Society. 

34. The West Elgin Agricultural Society. 

35. The Yarmouth and Belmont Agricultural 
Society. 

COUNTY OF ESSEX 

36. The Colchester South Agricultural Society. 

37. The Comber Agricultural Society. 

38. The Oldcastle Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF FRONTENAC 

39. The Parham Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF GLENGARRY 

40. The St. Lawrence Valley Agricultural 
Society. 

COUNTY OF GRENVILLE 

41. The Merrickville Agricultural Society. 

42. The Spencerville Agricultural Society. 



COUNTY OF GREY 

43. The Ayton Agricultural Society. 

44. The Collingwood Township Agricultural 
Society. 

45. The Desboro Agricultural Society. 

46. The Dundalk and District Agricultural 
Society. 

47. The Durham Agricultural Society. 

48. The Hanover, Bentinck and Brant Agri- 
cultural Society. 

49. The Holland Agricultural Society. 

50. The Keppel and Sarawak Agricultural 
Society. 

51. The Markdale Agricultural Society. 

52. The Meaford and St. Vincent Agricultural 
Society. 

53. The Normanby Agricultural Society. 

54. The Osprey Agricultural Society. 

55. The Rocklyn Agricultural Society. 

56. The Sydenham Agricultural Society. 

PROVISIONAL COUNTY OF HALIBURTON 

57. The Minden Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF HALTON 

58. The Acton Agricultural Society. 

59. The Esquesing Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF HASTINGS 

60. The Madoc Agricultural Society. 

61. The Marmora Agricultural Society. 

62. The Mohawk Agricultural Society. 

63. The Shannon ville Agricultural Society. 

64. The Stirling Agricultural Society. 

65. The Tweed Agricultural Society. 

66. The WoUaston Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF HURON 

67. The Bayfield Agricultural Society. 



20 



AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES 



Reg. 8 



68. The Blyth Agricultural Society. 

69. The Dungannon Agricultural Society. 

70. The East Huron Agricultural Society. 

71 . The Exeter Agricultural Society. 

72. The Howick Agricultural Society. 

73. The Huron Central Agricultural Society. 

74. The South Huron Agricultural Society. 

75. The Zurich Agricultural Society. 

DISTRICT OF KENORA 

76. The Dryden Agricultural Society. 

77. The Kenora Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF KENT 

78. The Moravian Agricultural Society. 

79. The Orford Agricultural Society. 

80. The Raleigh and Tilbury Agricultural 
Society. 

COUNTY OF LAMBTON 

81. The Bosanquet Agricultural Society. 

82. The Brooke and Alvinston Agricultural 
Society. 

83. The Florence Agricultural Society. 

84. The Forest Agricultural Society. 

85. The Plympton and Wyoming Agricultural 
Society. 

COUNTY OF LANARK 

86. The Dalhousie Agricultural Society. 

87. The Lanark Township Agricultural Society. 

88. The Lanark Village & Bathurst Agri- 
cultural Society. 

89. The Maberly Agricultural Society. 

90. The South Lanark Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF LEEDS 

91. The Delta Agricultural Society. 

92. The Lansdowne Agricultural Society. 

93. The Lombardy Agricultural Society. 



COUNTY OF LENNOX AND ADDINGTON 

94. The Addington Agricultural Society. 

95. The Denbigh Agricultural Society. 

96. The Emestown Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF LINCOLN 

97. The Smith ville Agricultural Society. 

DISTRICT OF MANITOULIN 

98. The Manitoulin Island Unceded Band Agri- 
cultural Society. 

99. The Manito waning Agricultural Society. 

100. The Providence Bay Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX 

101. The Caradoc Agricultural Society. 

102. The Dorchester Agricultural Society. 

103. The Melbourne Agricultural Society. 

104. The Mosa and Ekfrid Agricultural Society. 

105. The Parkhill Agricultural Society. 

106. The Thorndale Agricultural Society. 

107. The United Indian Agricultural Society. 

108. The Westminster Agricultural Society. 

DISTRICT OF MUSKOKA 

109. The Morrison Agricultural Society. 

110. The North Muskoka Agricultural Society. 

111. The South Muskoka Agricultural Society. 

112. The Stisted Agricultural Society. 

DISTRICT OF NIPISSING 

1 13. The Bonfield Agricultural Society. 

114. The Sturgeon Falls Agricultural Society. 

1 15. The Verner Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF NORFOLK 

116. The Charlotteville Agricultural Society. 

117. The Houghton Agricultural Society. 

118. The North Walsingham Agricultural 
Society. 



Reg. 8 



AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES 



21 



COUNTY OF NORTHUMBERLAND 

119. The Brighton Agricultural Society. 

120. The Percy Agricultural Society. 

121. The Roseneath Agricultural Society. 

122. The Seymour Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF ONTARIO 

123. The Brock Agricultural Society. 

124. The North Ontario Agricultural Society. 

125. The Port Perry, Reach and Scugog Agri- 
cultural Society. 

126. The Rama Agricultural Society. 

127. The Scott Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF OXFORD 

128. The Drumbo Agricultural Society. 

129. The Ingersoll, North and West Oxford 
Agricultural Society. 

130. The North Norwich Agricultural Society. 

131. The Tavistock Agricultural Society. 

132. The Tillsonburg and District Agricultural 
Society. 

133. The West Zorra and Embro Agricultural 
Society. 

DISTRICT OF PARRY SOUND 

134. The Armour, Ryerson and Burk's Falls 
Agricultural Society. 

135. The Dunchurch Agricultural Society. 

136. The Machar Agricultural Society. 

137. The Magnetawan Agricultural Society. 

138. The McKellar Agricultural Society. 

139. The McMurrich Agricultural Society. 

140. Perry Agricultural Society. 

141. The Powassan Agricultural Society. 

142. The Rosseau Agricultural Society. 

143. The Strong Agricultural Society. 

144. The Trout Creek Agricultural Society. 



COUNTY OF PEEL 

145. The Albion and Bolton Agricultural Society. 

146. The Caledon Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF PERTH 

147. The Kirkton Agricultural Society. 

148. The Listowel Agricultural Society. 

149. The Mornington Agricultural Society. 

150. The St. Marys Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF PETERBOROUGH 

151. The Apsley Agricultural Society. 

152. The Galway and Somerville Agricultural 
Society. 

153. The Lakefield Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF PRESCOTT 

154. The South Plantagenet Agricultural 
Society. 

155. The Vankleek Hill Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF PRINCE EDWARD 

156. The Sophiasburg Agricultural Society. 

DISTRICT OF RAINY RIVER 

157. The Atwood Agricultural Society. 

158. The Rainy River Valley Agricultural 
Society. 

COUNTY OF RENFREW 

159. The Arnprior Agricultural Society. 

160. The Cobden Agricultural Society. 

161. The North Renfrew Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF RUSSELL 

162. The Casselman Agricultural Society. 

163. The Clarence Agricultural Society. 

164. The Russell Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF SIMCOE 

165. The Cookstown Agricultural Society. 

166. The Flos Township Agricultural Society. 



22 



AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES 



Reg. 8 



167. The Huronia Agricultural Society. 

168. The Orillia Agricultural Society. 

169. The Oro Agricultural Society. 

170. The Tiny and Tay Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF STORMONT 

171. The Roxborough Agricultural Society. 

172. The Stormont Agricultural Society. 

DISTRICT OF SUDBURY 

173. The Chelmsford Agricultural Society. 

174. The Hanmer Agricultural Society. 

175. The Massey Agricultural Society. 

176. The Noelville Agricultural Society. 

177. The St. Charles Agricultural Society. 

178. The Warren Agricultural Society. 

DISTRICT OF THUNDER BAY 

179. The Oliver Agricultural Society. 

180. The Upsala Agricultural Society. 

181. The Whitefish Valley Agricultural Society. 

DISTRICT OF TIMISKAMING 

182. The Charlton Agricultural Society. 

183. The Englehart Agricultural Society. 

184. The New Liskeard Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF VICTORIA 

185. The Mariposa Agricultural Society. 

186. The Verulam Agricultural Society. 

187. The Fenelon Agricultural Society. 

COUNTY OF WATERLOO 

188. The Kitchener- Wateroo Agricultural and 
Industrial Association. 

189. The Wellesley and North Easthope Agri- 
cultural Society. 

190. The Wilmot Agricultural Society. 



COUNTY OF WELLINGTON 

191. The Arthur Agricultural Society. 

192. The Harriston Agricultural Society. 

193. The Mount Forest Agricultural Society. 

194. The Palmerston Agricultural Society. 

195. The Peel, Maryborough and Drayton Agri- 
cultural Society. 

196. The Puslinch Agricultural Society. 

197. The Wellington County Agricultural 
Society. 

COUNTY OF WENTWORTH 

198. The Binbrook Agricultural Society. 

199. The Flamboro and Waterdown Agricultural 
Society. 

COUNTY OF YORK 

200. The Aurora Agricultural Society. 

201. The Richmond HiU Agricultural Society. 

202. The Schomberg Agricultural Society. 

203. The Sutton Agricultural Society. R.R.O. 
1960, Reg. 6, s. 3(3); O. Reg. 65/62, s. 1(2). 

GRANTS 

4. — (1) The amounts of grants made to a society 
on account of expenditures made for capital improve- 
ments and repairs, other than a major undertaking, 
on the real property of the society in any calendar 
year, 

(a) shall be not more than 25 per cent of the 
amounts actually expended by the society 
on account of the capital improvements 
and repairs ; and 

(b) shall be in the case of a society of, 

(i) Class A, not more than $1,500, 
(ii) Class B, not more than $900, or 

(iii) Class C, not more than $600. 

(2) Subject to subsections 3 and 4, the amounts 
of grants made to a society on account of expendi- 
tures made for a major undertaking shall be not 
more than 25 per cent of the amounts actually 
expended by the society on account of the expendi- 
ture for the major undertaking, but not exceeding. 



Reg. 8 



AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES 



23 



(a) in the case of a society of Class A, $100,000 ; 

(6) in the case of a society of Class B, $50,000 ; 
or 

(c) in the case of a society of Class C, $25,000. 

(3) No society qualifies for a grant for a major 
undertaking unless the society, 

(a) submits plans, specifications and the esti- 
mated cost of the major undertaking to the 
Superintendent before any construction of 
the major undertaking is commenced; and 

(6) obtains from the Superintendent his 
approved in writing for the major under- 
taking, or for such amount or proportion of 
the cost thereof as he determines under 
subsection 4. 

(4) Where the major undertaking may not be used 
for agricultural purposes only, the amount or pro- 
portion of the cost of the major undertaking that is 
referable to agricultural purposes only shall, for 
purposes of a grant, be deemed to be the cost of the 
major undertaking. 

(5) Where the amount appropriated by the Legis- 
lature for grants under subsection 2 is insufiicent 
to pay the grants in any year, the grants shall be dis- 
tributed pro rata among those societies entitled to 
receive them and the balance may be paid from 
amounts appropriated for the purpose in succeeding 
years. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 6, s. 4. 

5. — (1) Where a society awards prize money for 
races or trials of speed for horses at an exhibition or 
fair and the amount of the prize money exceeds 25 
per cent of the amount of other prize money 
awarded by the society in the holding of the 
exhibition or fair, the excess shall not be used in 
calculating the amount of any grant. 

(2) For the purpose of subsection 1, in calculating 
the amount of money awarded as prizes for races or 
trials of speed for horses, the society may deduct from 
the amount of money awarded as prizes the amount 
of entry fees received. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 6, s. 5. 

6. Where, during its annual exhibition or fair, a 
society permits on its premises, 

(a) use of any part of the premises for purposes 
other than those of the society ; 

[h) a lottery conducted for other than charitable 
or benevolent purposes ; 

(c) and indecent show ; 

{d) soUciting of funds from the public ; or 

{e) an auction sale other than one organized or 
sponsored by the society. 



no grant is payable to the society in respect of the 
holding of the exhibition or fair. R.R.O. 1960, 
Reg. 6,' s. 6. 

7. — (1) Where a society makes expenditures for 
capital improvements or repairs on land or buildings, 
no grant is payable to the society in respect of the 
improvements or repairs unless the society, 

{a) owns the land and buildings ; or 

(6) holds an annual fair or exhibition on land 
owned by a municipality located within the 
area in which the society carries out its 
objects and the society holds the fair or 
exhibition under an agreement for the use of 
the land and buildings. 

(2) Every agreement under clause h of subsection 
1 shall provide that the society is entitled to use the 
land and buildings on the day or days of the holding 
of the fair or exhibition each year, for at least ten years 
from the date of application for the grant. R.R.O. 
1960, Reg. 6, s. 7. 

DUTIES OF OFFICERS 

8. The officers of a society are responsible for 
the safe custody of, 

[a) deeds, title papers and other documents 
relating to the property of the society ; 

(6) at least one copy of all minutes of proceed- 
ings, resolutions and by-laws of the society ; 
and 

(c) books and records of the society. R.R.O. 
1960, Reg. 6, s. 8. 

9. The secretary of a society shall, 

[a) attend all meetings of the society and keep 
true minutes thereof ; 

{h) conduct the correspondence of the society ; 
and 

(c) keep a record of, 

(i) all business transactions of the 
society, 

(ii) all resolutions passed by the society, 

(iii) all amendments to the by-laws of 
the society, 

(iv) a list of the members of the society 
and their addresses, 

(v) a list of the names and addresses of 
persons to whom prize money is 
paid and the amounts paid to each 
person. 



24 



AGRICULTURAL SOCIETIES 



Reg. 8 



(vi) all reports of committees that may 
from time to time be appointed by 
the society, and 

(vii) all annual statements and financial 
and auditor's reports. R.R.0. 1960, 
Reg. 6, s. 9. 



10. The treasurer of a society shall, 

(a) receive all moneys paid to the society and 
deposit them to the credit of the society in 
a chartered bank, as the society may by 
resolution direct ; 



(6) keep the securities of the society in safe 
custody ; 

(c) keep or cause to be kept proper books of 
account or make or cause to be made 
entries of all receipts and expenditures of 
the society ; 

(d) prepare the annual financial statement of 
the society ; and 

(e) prepare reports showing the financial posi- 
tion of the society, as the officers from 
time to time direct. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 
6, s. 10. 



Reg. 9 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



25 



REGULATION 9 

under The Air Pollution Control Act 



ADVISORY BOARD 
1. — (1) The Board shall consist of eleven members. 

(2) Each member of the Board shall hold office 
for one year or until his successor is appointed, and is 
eligible for reappointment. 

(3) Where a member ceases to be a member before 
the expiration of his term any person appointed in 
his stead shall hold office for the unexpired portion 
of the term. O. Reg. 206/68, s. 1 . 

2. Any five members of the Board constitute a 
quorum and are sufficient to perform all the functions 
of the Board on behalf of the Board. O. Reg. 206/68, 
S.2. 

3. The Chairman shall preside at all meetings of 
the Board. O. Reg. 206/68, s. 3. 

4. In the absence of the chairman from a meeting 
of the Board, the members present may, from among 
themselves, elect an acting chairman to preside at 
the meeting who shall have all of the powers of the 
chairman and carry out the duties of the chairman 
while he is so acting. O. Reg. 206/68, s. 4. 



5. For the purposes of the Act and the regulations, 
the address of the Board and of the secretary of the 
Board is 1 St. Clair Avenue, West, Toronto. O. Reg. 
206/68, s. 5. 



6. All oral evidence submitted at hearings of the 
Board shall be taken down in writing unless the 
Board, with the consent of the parties, otherwise 
directs. O. Reg. 206/68, s. 6. 



7. The remuneration of the members of the Board 
for each day or part thereof spent in attendance at 
meetings of the Board, or necessarily engaged in per- 
formance of duties required in the conduct of the 
business of the Board, shall be, 

{a) in the case of the chairman or acting chair- 
man, $100; 

{b) in the case of the secretary, $75; and 

(c) in the case of the members other than those 
mentioned in clause a or b, $50, 

together with travelling and living expenses nec- 
essarily incurred. O. Reg. 206/68, s. 7. 



26 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 10 



REGULATION 10 

under The Air Pollution Control Act 



AIR CONTAMINANTS FROM ASPHALT 
PAVING PLANTS 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "aggregate material" means a combination 
of minerals, including gravel, slag, lime- 
stone, crushed rock, sand, hydrated hme, 
cement, and furnace ash, chosen in such a 
combination as to produce an asphalt paving 
material with the desired properties when 
mixed with bituminous asphalt ; 

(b) "asphalt paving plant" means equipment 
designed to dry aggregate material and to 
mix the aggregate material with bituminous 
asphalt material ; 

(c) "dryer exhaust" means the total aggregate 
material being emitted to the outdoor atmo- 
sphere from the aggregate drying equipment 
and includes the material from transfer 
equipment and the material control equip- 
ment attached to the aggregate drying 
equipment ; 

{d) " permanent asphalt paving plant ' ' means an 
asphalt paving plant that remains at one 
location for more than one calendar year; 

{e) "plant operations" means all operations 
and activities associated with an asphalt 
paving plant and includes handling of 
aggregate material, storage of aggregate 
material, truck traffic and waste disposal; 

(J) "portable asphalt paving plant" means an 
asphalt paving plant that remains at one 
location for less than one calendar year. 
O.Reg. 111/70, s. 1. 



2. Every portable asphalt paving plant shall be 
so operated that, 



(a) the rate of the dryer exhaust is not in 
excess of 100 pounds an hour; 

(6) there is no visible airborne aggregate 
material, other than a water plume, resulting 
from plant operations beyond the Hmits of 
the plant property owned or leased by the 
owner or operator of the portable asphalt 
paving plant ; or 

(c) there is no impingement of a water plume, 
resulting from plant operations, beyond 
the Umits of the plant property owned or 
leased by the owner or operator of the port- 
able asphalt paving plant. O. Reg. 1 1 1/70, 
S.2. 

3. There shall be no impingement of a water 
plume, resulting from plant operations, beyond the 
limits of the plant property owned or leased by the 
owner or operator of a permanent asphalt paving 
plant. O. Reg. 111/70, s. 3. 

4. The owner or operator of each asphalt paving 
plant shall submit a written proposal to the Min- 
ister, showing in detail the methods and devices by 
which the owner or operator intends to meet the 
requirements of this Regulation. O. Reg. 111/70, 
S.4. 

5. Where, in the opinion of the owner or operator 
of an asphalt paving plant, it is not possible for the 
asphalt paving plant to be in compHance with the 
requirements of this Regulation, the owner or oper- 
ator may request the Minister to grant an extension 
of time for the asphalt paving plant to meet the 
requirements of this Regulation. O. Reg. 111/70, 
S.5. 

6. Upon receipt of a request, referred to in section 
5, for an extension of time for compliance, the Min- 
ister may grant the extension on such terms and 
conditions as he considers advisable in the cir- 
cumstances. O. Reg. 111/70, s. 6. 



Reg. 11 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



27 



REGULATION 11 



under The Air Pollution Control Act 



AIR CONTAMINANTS FROM FERROUS 
FOUNDRIES 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "effluent gas stream" means the combin- 
ation of gases and solids being emitted from 
a process or operation ; 

(b) "ferrous foundry" means the part of a 
building, or premises, or the workshop, 
structure, room or place in which iron or any 
of its alloys is cast in moulds or where 
core-making, shake-out or cleaning of any 
casting or other dust-causing or odour- 
causing operation ancillary to the casting 
process is carried on ; 

(c) "particulate" means solid particles; 

(d) "particulate collection efficiency" means 
the amount of the solid particles that is 
removed from the effluent gas stream, 
expressed as a percentage of the total par- 
ticulate in the uncontrolled effluent gas 
stream on a weight basis ; 

(e) " plus 25 micron fraction ' ' means that part of 
the total particulate in the effluent gas 
stream of which the nominal diameter is 
greater than 25 microns. O. Reg. 288/69, 
s. 1. 



2. This Regulation does not apply to, 

(a) die casting ; or 

(6) any premises or part thereof where steel 
ingots are cast. O. Reg. 288/69, s. 2. 

3. All ferrous foundry operations shall be designed 
and operated so as to have a minimum particulate 
collection efficiency of 97 per cent of the plus 25 
micron fraction. O. Reg. 288/69, s. 3. 

4. — (1) Where a ferrous foundry has a cupola with 
a melting capacity of not more than ten tons of iron 
an hour, the cupola shall be designed and operated 
so as to have, 

{a) a maximum emission of seventy-five pounds 
an hour of particulate and the remaining air 
contaminants shall be emitted in such a 
manner as to comply with the requirements 
of sections 5 and 6 of Regulation 15 of 
Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1970; 



(6) afterburners working at all times during the 
operation of the cupola ; 

(c) no water fallout beyond the limits of the 
land or premises on or in which the ferrous 
foundry is located ; and 

{d) no impingement of a water plume beyond 
the limits of the land or premises on or in 
which the ferrous foundry is located. 

(2) Where a ferrous foundry has a cupola with a 
melting capacity greater than ten tons of iron an 
hour, the cupola shall be designed and operated so as 
to have, 

{a) 2l maximum emission of twenty-five pounds 
an hour of particulate and the remaining air 
contaminants shall be emitted in such a 
manner as to comply with the requirements 
of sections 5 and 6 of Regulation 15 of 
Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1970; 

{h) afterburners working at all times during the 
operation of the cupola ; 

(c) no water fallout beyond the limits of the 
land or premises on or in which the ferrous 
foundry is located ; and 

{d) no impingement of a water plume beyond 
the limits of the land or premises on or in 
which the ferrous foundry is located. 

(3) Where a ferrous foundry has an electric arc 
furnace, the electric arc furnace shall be designed and 
operated so as to have, 

{a) a maximum emission of twenty-five pounds 
an hour of particulate and the remaining air 
contaminants shall be emitted in such a man- 
ner as to comply with the requirements of 
sections 5 and 6 of Regulation 15 of Revised 
Regulations of Ontario, 1970; 

(6) no water fallout beyond the limits of the 
land or premises on or in which the ferrous 
foundry is located ; and 

(c) no impingement of a water plume beyond 
the limits of the land or premises on or in 
which the ferrous foundry is located. O. 
Reg. 288/69, s. 4. 

5. The owner or operator of each ferrous foundry 
shall submit a written proposal to the Minister, 
showing in detail the method and devices by which 
the owner or operator intends to meet the require- 
ments of this Regulation. O. Reg. 288/69, s. 5. 



28 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 12 



REGULATION 12 

under The Air Pollution Control Act 



AIR CONTAMINANTS FROM MOTOR 
VEHICLES 



INTERPRETATION 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "crankcase" means the enclosure within a 
motor vehicle engine that is connected to the 
oil pump by internal passages through 
which gases and vapwurs can flow ; 

(b) "crankcase emissions" means air contamin- 
ant or contaminants that are emitted to the 
outdoor atmosphere through any opening 
in the crankcase ; 

(c) "diesel powered heavy commercial motor 
vehicles" means motor vehicles using diesel 
engines as the source of power ; 

{d) "engine displacement" means the product, 
expressed in cubic inches, resulting from 
the multiplication of the total cross-sectional 
area of the cylinders of the motor vehicle 
engine, as expressed in square inches, and 
the piston stroke, as expressed in inches; 

(e) "exhaust emissions" means air contaminant 
or contaminants emitted to the outdoor 
atmosphere from any opening downstream 
from the exhaust port of a motor vehicle 
engine ; 

(/) "exhaust emission system" in respect of a 
motor vehicle engine includes the exhaust 
port, exhaust manifold, exhaust pipe, 
muffler, tail pipe and such systems or 
devices incorporated therein or connected 
therewith to prevent or lessen the emission 
of air contaminant or contaminants into the 
outdoor atmosphere ; 

{g) "gasoline powered heavy commercial motor 
vehicles" means heavy commercial motor 
vehicles using gasoline engines of any type 
as the source of power and using gasoline 
or compressed or liquefied hydrocarbons as 
fuel; 

{h) "gross vehicle weight" means the manufac- 
turer's gross weight rating ; 

(») "heavy commercial motor vehicle" means a 
commercial motor vehicle as defined in The 
Highway Traffic Act, 



(i) that has a gross vehicle weight of 
more than 6,000 pounds, 

(ii) that is manufactured on or after the 
1st day of January, 1970, and 

(iii) for which a motor vehicle permit is 
issued by the Ontario Department of 
Transport ; 

(j) "light commercial motor vehicle" means a 
commercial motor vehicle as defined in The 
Highway Traffic Act, 

(i) that has a gross vehicle weight of not 
more than 6,000 pounds, 

(ii) that is manufactured after the com- 
mencement of the 1970 model year of 
the manufacturer, and 

(iii) for which a motor vehicle permit is 
issued by the Ontario Department of 
Transport ; 

{k) "light duty motor vehicle" means a pas- 
senger motor vehicle or a light commercial 
motor vehicle ; 

{I) "model" in respect of a new motor vehicle 
means a class of motor vehicle designed, 
constructed and assembled by the manu- 
facturer thereof for a particular purpose and 
designated as a model by the manufacturer 
during a model year ; 

(w) "model year" means the annual period of 
manufacturing of new motor vehicles or new 
motor vehicle engines, in the twelve-month 
period designated by the manufacturer, but, 
where the manufacturer does not so desig- 
nate such motor vehicles and motor vehicle 
engines, the model year in respect of such 
motor vehicles and motor vehicle engines 
means the twelve-month period beginning 
on the 1st day of January of the year in which 
such manufacturing begins ; 

(n) "motorcycle" means a self-propelled motor 
vehicle having a seat or saddle for the use of 
the driver and designed to travel on not 
more than three wheels in contact with the 
ground and includes a bicycle with a motor 
attached and a motor scooter, but does not 
include any motor vehicle that weighs at 
least 1 ,500 pounds ; 



Reg. 12 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



29 



(o) "motor vehicle engine" includes the exhaust 
emission system ; 

(/>) "opacity" in respect of the exhaust emission 
of a diesel powered heavy commercial motor 
vehicle , means the fraction of a beam of light , 
expressed as a percentage, that fails to pene- 
trate that exhaust emission ; 

{q) "passenger motor vehicle" means a motor 
vehicle other than a motorcycle or a bus, 

(i) that is designed to carry an operator 
and one or more passengers, 

(ii) that is manufactured after the com- 
mencement of the 1970 model year 
of the manufacturer, and 

(iii) for which a motor vehicle permit is 
issued by the Ontario Department of 
Transport ; 

(r) "system or device" includes any modifi- 
cation of a motor vehicle having a motor 
vehicle engine, which modification prevents 
or lessens the emission of air contaminant 
or contaminants into the outdoor atmos- 
phere ; 

(s) "ultimate purchaser" means the person to 
whom a motor vehicle permit for the opera- 
tion of a motor vehicle or motor vehicle 
engine is issued by the Ontario Department 
of Transport. O. Reg. 285/69, s. 1. 



APPLICATION 



2. This Regulation applies to, 

(a) new light duty motor vehicles ; and 

(b) new motor vehicle engines designed, con- 
structed and assembled by a manufacturer 
for installation in new light duty motor 
vehicles, 

lanufactured after the commencement of the 1970 
model year and sold, offered or exposed for sale to or 
used by the ultimate purchaser who is a resident of 
Ontario, and to, 

(c) new heavy commercial motor vehicles ; and 

{d) new motor vehicle engines designed, con- 
structed and assembled by a manufacturer 
for installation in new heavy commercial 
motor vehicles, 

manufactured on or after the 1st day of January, 
1970 and sold, offered or exposed for sale to or used 
by the ultimate purchaser who is a resident of Ontario. 
0. Reg. 285/69, s. 2. 



EXEMPTIONS 

3. The classes and types of new motor vehicles and 
new motor vehicle engines exempt from this Regula- 
tion are, 

(a) a motor vehicle engine that has an engine 
displacement of less than fifty cubic inches ; 

{b) a motor vehicle having a motor vehicle 
engine that has an engine displacement of 
less than fifty cubic inches ; 

(c) a motorcycle ; 

{d) a motor vehicle or motor vehicle engine not 
intended for use on a street or highway ; 

(e) a motor vehicle or motor vehicle engine that 
is operated by a person not a resident of 
Ontario who is in Ontario temporarily ; 

(/) a new light duty motor vehicle or new light 
duty motor vehicle engine that uses fuel 
other than gasoline or compressed or 
liquefied hydrocarbons for motive power ; 

(g) a new heavy commercial motor vehicle or 
new heavy commercial motor vehicle engine 
that uses fuel other than gasoline or com- 
pressed or liquefied hydrocarbons or diesel 
fuel for motive power ; 

{h) new light duty motor vehicles having new 
light duty motor vehicle engines of a specified 
engine displacement of which not more 
than fifty such new hght duty motor 
vehicles having new light duty motor 
vehicle engines are sold or dehvered in 
Ontario in any model year ; or 

{i) any new light duty motor vehicle, having a 
new light duty motor vehicle engine, form- 
ing part of a manufacturer's total annual 
sales volume in Ontario, where such total 
annual sales volume does not exceed 100 
new light duty motor vehicles having new 
light duty motor vehicle engines. O. Reg. 
285/69, s. 3. 



STANDARDS FOR SYSTEMS OR DEVICES 

4. Where a system or device is installed on or in- 
corporated in a new motor vehicle or a new motor 
vehicle engine, such system or device in its operation 
or function shall meet the requirements of sections 6 
to 8 and, 

(a) shall not cause emission into the outdoor 
atmosphere of any air contaminant or con- 
taminants that would not be emitted into 
the outdoor atmosphere during the operation 
of such motor vehicle or motor vehicle 
engine if the motor vehicle or motor vehicle 



30 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 12 



engine were not equipped with such system 
or device ; and 

(6) shall not result in any unsafe condition en- 
dangering persons or property. O. Reg. 
285/69. s. 4. 

CRANKCASE EMISSIONS 

5. — (1) Where a new Hght duty motor vehicle or 
new light duty motor vehicle engine is operated in 
Ontario, the crankcase of the light duty motor vehicle 
engine shall be constructed in such manner and 
maintained in such condition that no crankcase emis- 
sions are discharged into the outdoor atmosphere. 

(2) Where a new gasoUne powered heavy com- 
mercial motor vehicle or new gasohne powered heavy 
commercial motor vehicle engine is operated in 
Ontario, the crankcase of the motor vehicle engine 
shall be constructed in such manner and maintained 
in such condition that no crankcase emissions are 
discharged into the outdoor atmosphere. 

(3) The manufacturer of any new motor vehicle or 
new motor vehicle engine on or in which a system or 
device is installed or incorporated to comply with the 
requirements of subsection 1 or 2 shall test or cause 
to be tested as many motor vehicles and motor 
vehicle engines as are required to ensure that the 
motor vehicles or motor vehicle engines meet the 
requirements of subsection 1 or 2, as the case may be, 
for not less than one year after sale and delivery to 
the ultimate purchaser. O. Reg. 285/69, s. 5. 

EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM LIGHT DUTY MOTOR 
VEHICLES AND LIGHT DUTY MOTOR VEHICLE ENGINES 

6. — (1) For the purposes of this section, 

(a) where the records of a manufacturer of his 
sales in Ontario of motor vehicles in any year 
are not available or are inadequate for the 
selection of new motor vehicles and new 
motor vehicle engines for a model year for 
testing under subsection 5, the manufacturer 
shall make selections of new motor vehicles 
and new motor vehicle engines on the basis 
of his total sales of motor vehicles and motor 
vehicle engines ; or 

{b) where any motor vehicle manufacturer is 
subject to the terms and conditions of the 
Canada-U.S. Automotive Products Trade 
Agreement, he may, when seecting new light 
duty motor vehicles and new light duty 
motor vehicle engines for a model year for 
testing under subsection 5, base his selection 
on the records of his sales for the area covered 
by the Agreement. 

(2) Where a new light duty motor vehicle or a new 
Hght duty motor vehicle engine is operated in Ontario, 
the hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide content of the 
exhaust emissions shall not exceed, 



(a) 2.2 grams of hydrocarbons per vehicle mile ; 
or 

{b) 23 grams of carbon monoxide per vehicle 
mile. 

(3) The requirements of subsection 2 apply to 
composite values calculated under subsection 7 from 
results obtained in tests of exhaust emissions from 
the operation of the new light duty motor vehicles 
and new light duty motor vehicle engines in accor- 
dance with the test procedures set out in para- 
graphs 4 and 5 of subsection 5. 

(4) Where the composite value calculated under 
subsection 7 for a new light duty motor vehicle hav- 
ing a new light duty motor vehicle engine of a 
specified engine displacement does not exceed the 
amounts of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide set 
out in subsection 2, every new light duty motor 
vehicle having a new light duty motor vehicle 
engine of the same specified engine displacement 
shall be deemed to comply with the requirements of 
subsection 2. 

(5) Procedures for selecting, testing and inspecting 
exhaust emission control systems or devices installed 
on or incorporated in new light duty motor vehicles 
and new light duty motor vehicle engines to prevent 
or lessen the emission into the outdoor atmosphere of 
any air contaminant or contaminants from the opera- 
tion of such new hght duty motor vehicles or new 
Hght duty motor vehicle engines, shall be as follows: 



Where a manufacturer of new light duty 
motor vehicles and new light duty motor 
vehicle engines intends to sell, offer or 
expose for sale in any model year a new Hght 
duty motor vehicle having a new light duty 
motor vehicle engine, he shall select, from 
his manufacture of such light duty motor 
vehicles and Hght duty motor vehicle 
engines, for testing of exhaust emissions, 

(a) at least two such light duty motor 
vehicles having light duty motor 
vehicle engines of the same engine 
displacement ; and 

(b) where the probable sales volume of 
new light duty motor vehicles having 
light duty motor vehicle engines of a 
specified engine displacement will 
account for at least one-half of one 
per cent of the total number of new 
light duty motor vehicles sold in 
Ontario in the latest preceding model 
year of the manufacturer for which 
sales records in Ontario are available, 
at least four new light duty motor 
vehicles having new light duty motor 
vehicle engines of the same engine 
displacement. 



Reg. 12 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



31 



but in no case shall any exhaust emission 
control system or device used by the manu- 
facturer be represented on fewer than two 
new light duty motor vehicles, and in no case 
shall the total number of new light duty 
motor vehicles having new light duty motor 
vehicle engines be fewer than four. 

2. New hght duty motor vehicles selected under 
paragraph 1 and used for the testing of new 
light duty motor vehicle engines shall be 
those motor vehicles in which the manufac- 
turer usually installs such engines and shall 
be equipped as nearly as possible with 
transmission and carburetors in proportion 
to the number of comparable light duty 
motor vehicles so equipped in the latest 
preceding model year of the manufacturer 
for which his sales records in Ontario are 
available. 

3. Where under paragraph 2 a manufacturer 
makes tests of new light duty motor vehicles 
having new light duty motor vehicle engines 
and installs a combination of engine and 
transmission system in more than one model 
of light duty motor vehicle, only one series 
of tests of exhaust emissions is required, 
but, where the combination of such engine 
and transmission system in any new hght 
duty motor vehicle may increase the amount 
of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide in 
the exhaust emissions, tests are required in 
respect of each Hght duty motor vehicle. 

4. Each new light duty motor vehicle havinj; 
a new light duty motor vehicle en,u:iiu' 
selected for testing under paragraph 1 lor 
amounts of hydrocarbons and carbon 
monoxide in exhaust emissions shall be 
driven a distance of at least 4,000 miles 
with all emission control systems or fevices 
installed and operating and tests shall then 
be made for the amounts of hydrocarbons 
and carbon monoxide in the exhaust 
emissions, each test being of the new light 
duty motor vehicle running on a dynamo- 
meter and the motor vehicle engine for each 
test being run from a cold start through 
seven identical testing cycles without 
stalling of the light duty motor vehicle 
engine and with each cycle lasting 137 
seconds and consisting of a series of periods 
of acceleration, deceleration, steady speeds 
and idhng. 

5. The hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide con- 
tent of the exhaust emissions referred to in 
paragraph 4 shall be measured for each 
period of the first four cycles and the last 
two cycles of the seven testing cycles and 
shall be recorded in respect of each new 
light duty motor vehicle engine so that a 
value, expressed as grams per vehicle mile, 



representative of the hydrocarbon and 
carbon monoxide content in the exhaust 
emissions during the periods of the six 
recorded testing cycles, is obtained for that 
engine for the purposes of subsection 7. 

6. In addition totheselectionof new light duty 
motor vehicles having new light duty motor 
vehicle engines for testing of exhaust emis- 
sions under paragraphs 2 to 5, the manu- 
facturer shall select not fewer than four and 
not more than twelve new hght duty motor 
vehicles for tests of durability of the systems 
or devices or of the exhaust emission system 
and in the selection he shall have regard to 
the combinations of engine displacements 
and transmissions, including automatic and 
manual transmission installations, so that 
his selections represent at least 70 per cent 
of the number of light duty motor vehicles 
sold by the manufacturer in Ontario during 
his latest preceding model year for which his 
sales records in Ontario are available, but 
where his records show that the total number 
of light duty motor vehicles sold by him in 
Ontario is less than 10 per cent of the total 
sales in Ontario of all hght duty motor 
vehicles of all manufacturers, the combin- 
ations shall be so chosen that the number of 
new light duty motor vehicles tested for 
durability of the systems or devices or of the 
exhaust emission systems shall be not fewer 
than four and not more than eight and 
shall represent at least 50 per cent of the 
number of light duty motor vehicles sold by 
the manufacturer during such model year, 
but in no case shall fewer than two motor 
vehicles containing each exhaust emission 
control system or device be tested nor shall 
the total number of new light duty motor 
vehicles so tested be fewer than four. 

7. Every new light duty motor vehicle having a 
new light duty motor vehicle engine selected 
under paragraph 6 shall be driven a distance 
of at least 50,000 miles and tested in the man- 
ner referred to in paragraph 4, the tests to 
be carried out on each new light duty 
motor vehicle at intervals of not more than 
4,000 miles, and the results from such tests 
shall be recorded. 

8. From the results recorded under paragraph 
7 a value shall be calculated for the 
hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide exhaust 
emissions over the seven-cycle test for each 
4,000 mile interval for each new light duty 
motor vehicle in the manner described in 
paragraph 5 and the representative values 
thus obtained shall be used in the calculation 
of the factor mentioned in subsection 7. 

(0) Where recording is made in this section of 
results of tests for amounts of hydrocarbons and car- 



32 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 12 



bon monoxide in exhaust emissions in respect of any 
new light duty motor vehicle having a new light duty 
motor vehicle engine, two composite values, one for 
hydrocarbons and one for carbon monoxide, shall be 
determined under subsection 7 for each engine dis- 
placement, which composite values take into account 
factors of deterioration in efficiency of the system or 
device installed thereon or incorporated therein, 
resulting from the use of that new light duty motor 
vehicle and new light duty motor vehicle engine, in 
accordance with the procedure under subsection 7. 

(7) The procedure for the calculation of the compo- 
site value of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide in the 
exhaust emissions of each new light duty motor vehicle 
tested shall be as follows : 

1 . For each exhaust emission control system or 
device, two emission deterioration factors, 
one for hydrocarbons and one for carbon 
monoxide, shall be determined by using the 
results obtained from the relevant new hght 
duty motor vehicles and new light duty 
motor vehicle engines tested under para- 
graphs 7 and 8 of subsection 5 by, 

(a) plotting two graphs, one for hydro- 
carbons and one for carbon mon- 
oxide, of vehicle mileage against 
exhaust emission levels for each con- 
trol system or device tested under 
paragraphs 7 and 8 of subsection 5 ; 

(b) drawing a straight line, by the 
method of least squares, as near as 
possible to the points plotted on each 
graph ; and 

(c) calculating the deterioration factors 
in respect of hydrocarbons and car- 
bon monoxide for deterioration in 
efficiency for each exhaust emission 
control system or device in accord- 
ance with the following formula : 

exhaust emissions interpolated 
to 50.000 miles 



factor = 



exhaust emissions interpolated 
to 4,000 miles 

The exhaust emission test results from each 
new light duty motor vehicle tested under 
paragraphs 4 and 5 of subsection 5 shall be 
multiplied by the appropriate factor deter- 
mined in paragraph 1 of this subsection for 
hydrocarbons or carbon monoxide for the 
particular exhaust emission control system 
or device installed on or incorporated in the 
engine of that new light duty motor vehicle. 

For each engine displacement, the results 
obtained in apargraph 2 for each new light 
duty motor vehicle in that engine displace- 



ment class shall be weighted in proportion 
to the projected sales of the new light duty 
motor vehicles represented by each test 
vehicle. 

For each engine displacement, the weighted 
results obtained in paragraph 3 shall be 
averaged. 

For each engine displacement, the exhaust 
emissions to be compared with the standard, 
referred to in subsection 2, shall be the 
averaged values for hydrocarbons and 
carbon monoxide obtained under paragraph 
4. O. Reg. 285/69, s. 6. 



EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM GASOLINE POWERED 
HEAVY COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLE ENGINES 

7.^-(l) For the purposes of this section, where the 
records of a manufacturer of his sales in Ontario of 
gasoline powered heavy commercial motor vehicle 
engines are not available or are inadequate or, where 
he is subject to the terms and conditions of the 
Canada-U.S. Automotive Products Trade Agreement, 
he shall make selections of such engines for testing 
in the manner described in subsection 1 of section 6. 

(2) Where a new gasoline powered heavy com- 
mercial motor vehicle or a new gasoline powered heavy 
commercial motor vehicle engine is operated in 
Ontario, the hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide con- 
tent of the exhaust emissions shall not exceed, 

{a) 275 parts per miUion by volume of hydro- 
carbons ; or 

(b) 1 .5 per cent by volume of carbon monoxide. 

(3) The requirements of subsection 2 apply to 
composite values calculated under subsection 7 from 
results obtained in tests of exhaust emissions from the 
operation of the new gasoline powered heavy com- 
mercial motor vehicle engines in accordance with the 
test procedures set out in paragraphs 2 and 3 of 
subsection 5. 

(4) Where the composite value calculated under 
subsection 7 for any combination of exhaust emission 
control system or device and new gasoline powered 
heavy commercial motor vehicle engine of a specified 
engine displacement does not exceed the amounts of 
hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide set out in sub- 
section 2, every new heavy commercial motor vehicle 
having such combination of exhaust emission control 
system or device and gasoline powered heavy com- 
mercial motor vehicle engine of that specified engine 
displacement installed therein shall be deemed to 
comply with the requirements of subsection2. 

(5) Procedures for selecting, testing and inspecting 
exhaust emission control systems or devices installed 
on or incorporated in new gasoline powered heavy 
commercial motor vehicle engines shall be as follows: 



Reg. 12 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



33 



1. Where a manufacturer of new gasoline 
powered heavy commercial motor vehicles 
and new gasoline powered heavy commercial 
motor vehicle engines intends to sell, offer 
or expose for sale in any model year a new 
heavy commercial motor vehicle having a 
new gasoline powered heavy commercial 
motor vehicle engine, he shall select, from 
his manufacture of such motor vehicles and 
motor vehicle engines for testing of exhaust 
emissions, 

(a) at least one new gasoHne powered 
heavy commercial motor vehicle 
engine of each combination of engine 
displacement and exhaust emission 
control system or device ; and 

(b) where the probable sales volume of 
new heavy commercial motor vehicles 
having a combination of a gasoline 
powered engine of a specified engine 
displacement and an exhaust emis- 
sion control system or device will 
account for at least one-half of one 
per cent of the total number of new 
gasoline powered heavy commercial 
motor vehicle engines sold in Ontario 
in the latest preceding model year of 
the manufacturer for which sales 
records in Ontario are available, at 
least two new gasoline powered 
heavy commercial motor vehicle 
engines of such combination of engine 
displacement and exhaust emission 
control system or device, 

but in no case shall the total number of new 
gasoline powered heavy commercial motor 
vehicle engines be fewer than two. 

2. Each new gasoline powered heavy com- 
mercial motor vehicle engine selected for 
testing under paragraph 1 for amounts of 
hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide in 
exhaust emissions shall be operated a mini- 
mum of 1 25 hours on an engine dynamometer 
with all exhaust emission control systems or 
devices installed and operating, after which 
time the engine shall be switched off for at 
least one hour, then tests for the amounts 
of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide in the 
exhaust emissions shall be made with the 
engine, after idling for an initial five minute 
period, running through four identical 
testing cycles and with each cycle lasting 
300 seconds and consisting of a series of 
periods of acceleration, deceleration, steady 
speed and idhng. 

3. The hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide 
content of the exhaust emissions referred 
to in paragraph 2 shall be measured for 
each period of the four testing cycles and 



shall be recorded in respect of each gas- 
ohne powered heavy commercial motor ve- 
hicle engine, so that a value, representative 
of the hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide 
content in the exhaust emissions during 
the periods of the four testing cycles, is 
obtained for that engine for the purposes 
of subsection 7. 

4. In addition to the selection of combinations 
of new gasoline powered heavy commer- 
cial motor vehicle engines and exhaust 
emission control systems or devices for the 
testing of exhaust emissions under para- 
graph 2, the manufacturer shall select not 
fewer than two and not more than six com- 
binations of new gasoline powered heavy 
commercial motor vehicle engines and ex- 
haust emission control systems or devices 
for tests of durability of such systems or 
devices or of the exhaust emission system 
so that his selections represent at least 
70 per cent of the number of new gasoline 
powered heavy commercial motor vehicle 
engines sold by the manufacturer in Ontario 
during his latest preceding model year for 
which his sales records in Ontario are avail- 
able, but where his records show that the 
total number of new gasoline powered heavy 
commercial motor vehicle engines sold by 
him in Ontario is less than 10 per cent of 
the total sales in Ontario of all new gasoline 
powered heavy commercial motor vehicle 
engines of all manufacturers, the combina- 
tions shall be so chosen that the number 
of new gasoline powered heavy commercial 
motor vehicle engines tested for durabil- 
ity of the systems or devices or of the ex- 
haust emission systems represents at least 
50 per cent of the number of gasoline 
powered heavy commercial motor vehicle 
engines sold by the manufacturer during 
that latest preceding model year, but in 
no case shall the number of new gasoline 
powered heavy commercial motor vehicle 
engines so tested be fewer than two. 

5. Every combination of new gasoline powered 
heavy commercial motor vehicle engine 
and exhaust emission control system or 
device selected for testing under paragraph 

4 shall be driven on an engine dynamo- 
meter for at least 1,500 hours and tested 
in the manner referred to in paragraph 2, 
the tests to be carried out on each new 
gasoHne powered heavy commercial motor 
vehicle engine at intervals of not more than 
125 hours, and the results from such tests 
shall be recorded. 

6. From the results recorded under paragraph 

5 a value shall be calculated for the hydro- 
carbon and carbon monoxide content of the 
exhaust emissions over the whole four- 



34 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 12 



cycle test for each 125 hour interval for 
each new gasoline powered heavy commer- 
cial motor vehicle engine in the manner 
described in paragraph 3 and the repre- 
sentative values thus obtained shall be used 
in the calculation of the factor mentioned 
in subsection 7. 

(6) Where recording is made in this section of 
results of tests for amounts of hydrocarbons and 
carbon monoxide in exhaust emissions in respect 
of any new gasoline powered heavy commercial 
motor vehicle engine, two composite values, one 
for hydrocarbons and one for carbon monoxide, shall 
be determined under subsection 7 for each com- 
bination of engine displacement and exhaust emission 
control system or device, which values take into 
account factors of deterioration in efficiency of the 
system or device installed thereon or incorporated 
therein, resulting from the use of such engine in 
accordance with the procedure under subsection 7. 

(7) The procedure for the calculation of the com- 
posite value of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide 
in the exhaust emissions of each new gasoHne powered 
heavy commercial motor vehicle engine tested shall 
be as follows : 

1. For each exhaust emission control system 
or device two deterioration factors, one 
for hydrocarbons and one for carbon 
monoxide, shall be determined by using 
the results obtained from the new gasoline 
powered heavy commercial motor vehicle 
engines tested under paragraphs 5 and 6 
of subsection 5 by, 

{a) (a) plotting two graphs, one for hydro- 
carbons and one for carbon monoxide 
of hours of operation against exhaust 
emission levels for each emission 
control system or device tested under 
paragraphs 5 and 6 of subsection 5 ; 

(6) drawing a straight line, by the 
method of least squares, as near as 
possible to the points plotted on 
each graph ; and 

(c) calculating the deterioration factors 
in respect of hydrocarbons and 
carbon monoxide for deterioration 
in efficiency for each exhaust 
emission control system or device 
in accordance with the following 
formula : 



factor = 



exhaust emissions interpolated 
to 1,500 hours 

exhaust emissions interpolated 
to 125 hours 



2. The exhaust emission test results from 



each new gasoline powered heavy commer- 
cial motor vehicle engine tested under para- 
graphs 2 and 3 of subsection 5 shall be 
multiplied by the appropriate factor deter- 
mined in paragraph 1 of this subsection 
for hydrocarbons or carbon monoxide for 
the particular exhaust emission control 
system or device installed on or incor- 
porated in that new gasoline powered heavy 
commercial motor vehicle engine. 

3. For each engine displacement, the results 
obtained in paragraph 2 for all new gas- 
oline powered heavy commercial motor ve- 
hicle engines in that engine displacement 
class shall be weighted in proportion to 
the projected sales of new gasoline powered 
heavy commercial motor vehicles and new 
gasoline powered heavy commercial motor 
vehicle engines represented by each test 
engine. 

4. For each engine displacement, the weighted 
results obtained in paragraph 3 shall be 
averaged. 

5. For each engine displacement, the exhaust 
emissions to be compared with the stand- 
ard, referred to in subsection 2, shall be the 
average values for hydrocarbons and 
carbon monoxide obtained under para- 
graph 4. O. Reg. 285/69. s. 7. 



SMOKE FROM DIESEL POWERED HEAVY 
COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLE ENGINES 

8. — (1) For the purposes of this section, where the 
records of a manufacturer of his sales in Ontario of 
diesel powered heavy commercial motor vehicle 
engines are not available or are inadequate or, where 
he is subject to the terms and conditions of the 
Canada-U.S. Automotive Products Trade Agree- 
ment, he shall make selections of such engines for 
testing in the manner described in subsection 1 of 
section 6. 

(2) Where a new diesel powered heavy commercial 
motor vehicle or a new diesel powered heavy com- 
mercial motor vehicle engine is operated in Ontario, 
the opacity of the exhaust emissions shall not exceed, 

{a) 40 per cent opacity during the acceleration 
mode ; or 

(6) 20 per cent opacity during the lugging 
mode. 

(3) The requirements of subsection 2 apply to 
composite values calculated under subsection 7 from 
results obtained in tests of exhaust emissions from 
the operation of the new diesel powered heavy com- 
mercial motor vehicle engines in accordance with 
the test procedures set out in paragraphs 2 and 3 
of subsection 5. 



Reg. 12 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



35 



(4) Where the values calculated under subsection 
7 for any group of new diesel powered heavy com- 
mercial motor vehicle engines do not exceed the levels 
of opacity set out in subsection 2, every new heavy 
commercial motor vehicle having a diesel engine 
included in that group shall be deemed to comply 
with the requirements of subsection 2. 

(5) Procedures for selecting, testing and inspecting 
exhaust emission control systems or devices installed 
on or incorporated in new diesel powered heavy 
commercial motor vehicle engines, shall be as follows : 

1. Where a manufacturer of new diesel 
powered heavy commercial motor vehicles 
and new diesel powered heavy commercial 
motor vehicle engines intends to sell, offer 
or expose for sale in any model year a new 
heavy commercial motor vehicle having a 
new diesel powered heavy commercial 
motor vehicle engine, he shall divide his 
manufacture of such engines into groups, 
each engine group consisting of a specific 
combination of combustion cycle, cylinder 
configuration and dimensions, method of 
air aspiration and fuel feed, and shall select 
from each group for testing of opacity of 
exhaust emissions two engines that feature 
the highest fuel feed per stroke, primarily 
at the speed of maximum torque and sec- 
ondarily at rated speed. 



2. Each new diesel powered heavy commercial 
motor vehicle engine selected for testing 
under paragraph 1 for opacity of exhaust 
emissions shall be operated on an engine 
dynamometer for at least 125 hours with 
the dynamometer and engine adjusted so 
that the motor vehicle engine is operating 
at 95 to 100 per cent of rated speed and at 
95 to 100 per cent of maximum rated horse- 
power, after which time the warm motor 
vehicle engine shall be preconditioned by 
being operated for ten minutes at maximum 
rated horsepower, then tested for opacity 
of exhaust emissions by being operated 
through three cycles, each cycle consisting 
of periods of accelerating and lugging, with 
a five-minute period of idhng between each 
cycle. 

3. The opacity of the exhaust emissions re- 
ferred to in paragraph 2 shall be recorded 
during the whole of each of the three cycles, 
from which records values, representative 
of the opacity of the exhaust emissions 
during the three acceleration periods and 
the three lugging periods, shall be obtained 
for the purposes of subsection 7. 

4. In addition to the selection of new diesel 
powered heavy commercial motor vehicle 
engines for testing of opacity of the exhaust 



emissions under paragraph 2, the manu- 
facturer shall select from each group men- 
tioned in paragraph 1, for tests of durability 
and hfetime opacity of exhaust emissions, 
one new diesel powered heavy commercial 
motor vehicle engine that features the 
highest fuel feed per stroke, primarily at 
rated speed and secondarily at the speed of 
maximum torque, but where his records 
show that the total number of new diesel 
powered heavy commercial motor vehicle 
engines sold by him in Ontario is less than 
5 per cent of the total sales in Ontario of 
all diesel powered heavy commercial motor 
vehicle engines of all manufacturers, he 
shall not be required to test more than four 
new diesel powered heavy commercial 
motor vehicle engines, which engines shall 
be selected from the groups of such engines 
in order of expected sales volume and shall 
represent as many groups as possible and 
shall include at least one new diesel powered 
heavy commercial motor vehicle engine 
using each combustion cycle and one new 
diesel powered heavy commercial motor 
vehicle engine using each method of air 
aspiration included in the expected pro- 
duction of the manufacturer. 



5 . Every new diesel powered heavy commercial 
motor vehicle engine tested under para- 
graph 4 shall be driven on an engine dynamo- 
meter for at least 1,000 hours with the 
dynamometer and new diesel powered heavy 
commercial motor vehicle engine adjusted 
so that the vehicle engine is operating at 
95 to 100 per cent of rated speed and at 
95 to 100 per cent of maximum rated horse- 
power and is tested in the manner referred 
to in paragraph 2, the tests to be carried 
out on each new diesel powered heavy com- 
mercial motor vehicle engine at intervals 
of not more than 125 hours, and the results 
from such tests shall be recorded. 

6. From the results recorded under paragraph 
5 values shall be calculated for the opacity 
of exhaust emissions over the whole three- 
cycle test for each 125 hour interval for 
each new diesel powered heavy commercial 
motor vehicle engine in the manner de- 
scribed in paragraph 3 and the repre- 
sentative values thus obtained shall be used 
in the calculation of the factor mentioned 
in subsection 7. 



(6) Where recording is made in this section of 
results of tests for the opacity of exhaust emissions 
in respect of any new diesel powered heavy com- 
mercial motor vehicle engine, composite values for 
the acceleration and lugging modes shall be deter- 
mined under subsection 7 for each group of diesel 
engines, which values take into account factors of 



36 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 12 



deterioration in efficiency of the control of exhaust 
emissions from the use of such diesel powered heavy 
commercial motor vehicle engines in accordance 
with the procedure under subsection 7. 



(7) The procedure for calculation of the composite 
value of the opacity during the acceleration mode 
and the lugging mode of each new diesel powered 
heavy commercial motor vehicle engine tested shall 
be as follows: 



For each new diesel powered heavy com- 
mercial motor vehicle engine tested under 
paragraphs 5 and 6 of subsection 5, two 
emission deterioration factors, one for the 
acceleration mode and one for the lugging 
mode, shall be determined by using the 
results obtained from tests under para- 
graphs 5 and 6 of subsection 5 by, 

(a) plotting two graphs, one for the 
acceleration mode and one for the 
lugging mode, of hours of operation 
against the percentage opacity 
during the relevant mode for each 
new diesel powered heavy commer- 
cial motor vehicle engine tested under 
paragraphs 5 and 6 of subsection 5 ; 

(b) drawing a straight Une, by the 
method of least squares, as near as 
possible to the points plotted on 
each graph ; and 

(c) calculating the deterioration factors 
in respect of the acceleration mode 
and the lugging mode for deteriora- 
tion in efficiency for each new diesel 
powered heavy commercial motor 
vehicle engine in accordance with 
the following formula : 



factor 



percentage opacity interpolated 
to 1,000 hours minus 

percentage opacity interpolated 
to 125 hours 



2. For each group of new diesel powered heavy 
commercial motor vehicle engines, the ex- 
haust emission test results from each of the 
two new diesel powered heavy commercial 
motor vehicle engines tested under para- 
graphs 2 and 3 of subsection 5 shall be 
added to the appropriate factor determined 
in paragraph 1 of this subsection for the 
acceleration mode or the lugging mode of 
the appropriate new diesel powered heavy 
commercial motor vehicle engine repre- 
senting that group, or, if that group is 
not represented, shall be added to the 
appropriate factor of the new diesel powered 
heavy commercial motor vehicle engine, 



tested under paragraphs 2 and 3 of sub- 
section 5, having the same combustion cycle 
and the same method of air aspiration and, 
as near as possible, the same fuelMeed per 
stroke. 

3. For each group of new diesel powered heavy 
commercial motor vehicle engines, the 
opacity values to be compared with the 
standard, referred to in subsection 2, shall 
be the average opacity values of the two 
new diesel powered heavy commercial motor 
vehicle engines of that group obtained in 
paragraph 2. O. Reg. 285/69, s. 8. 

APPLICATION AND APPROVAL PROCEDURES 

9. — (1) Where the manufacturer of new motor 
vehicles and new motor vehicle engines has tested 
representative vehicles and engines thereof in accor- 
dance with the test procedures described in sections 
6 to 8 and an apphcation is made to the Minister for 
approval of the systems or devices installed on or 
incorporated in such vehicles and engines, the 
Minister may issue a certificate of approval for the 
system or device. 

(2) Every application under subsection 1 shall be 
in writing and shall state, 

(a) particulars of the new motor vehicles and 
new motor vehicle engines that were tested ; 

{b) particulars of the tests, including the pro- 
cedures and results ; and 

(c) particulars of the systems or devices that 
are to be installed on or incorporated in 
the new motor vehicles or new motor vehicle 
engines for the model year. 

(3) Where, during any model year, a manufacturer 
makes alterations to systems or devices installed 
on or incorporated in new motor vehicles or new 
motor vehicle engines for which a certificate of 
approval has been issued, which alterations could 
increase exhaust emissions above the levels pre- 
scribed in sections 6 to 8, the particulars of such 
alterations shall be furnished to the Minister who, 
where he is of the opinion that the alterations are 
at variance with the existing certificate of approval 
issued to the manufacturer, may cancel the certifi- 
cate of approval and require a recertification of 
the altered motor vehicle or motor vehicle engine. 

(4) Where the Minister issues a certificate of appro- 
val of a system or device installed on or incorporated 
in a new motor vehicle or a new motor vehicle engine 
to prevent or lessen the emission into the outdoor 
atmosphere of any air contaminant or contaminants, 
the certificate of approval shall remain in effect for 
the whole of the model year for which the certifi- 
cate of approval was issued, unless the certificate 
of approval is cancelled under subsection 3. 



Reg. 12 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



37 



(5) Every manufacturer of new motor vehicles or 
new motor vehicle engines shall furnish to the 
Minister, upon request, the range of designations 
applied by the manufacturer to new motor vehicles 
and new motor vehicle engines, 

(a) that he intends to manufacture in any 
model year; and 

(6) that have systems or devices to be installed 
thereon or incorporated thereon, for which 
systems or devices the Minister has issued 
a certificate of approval. O. Reg. 285/69, 
s. 9. 



(6) Where a certificate of approval has been issued 
under subsection 1 in respect of any new motor 
vehicle or new motor vehicle engine, a plate or an 
adhesive label shall be affixed to such engine or to 
the engine compartment of such vehicle, stating 
that such engine or vehicle complies with the relevant 
sections of this Regulation and giving any other 
data as may be necessary for the correct maintenance 
and function of any exhaust emission control system 
or device that is installed on or incorporated in such 
engine or vehicle. O. Reg. 134/70, s. 1. 



38 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 13 



REGULATION 13 

under The Air Pollution Control Act 



AIR CONTAMINANTS FROM 1969 
MODEL MOTOR VEHICLES 

INTERPRETATION 

1. In this Regulation, 

{a) "commercial motor vehicle" means a com- 
mercial motor vehicle as defined in The 
Highway Traffic Act and, 

(i) that has a design capacity of not 
more than one-half ton, 

(ii) that is manufactured during the 1 969 
model year of the manufacturer, 
and 

(iii) for which a motor vehicle permit is 
issued by the Ontario Department 
of Transport ; 

{b) "crankcase" means the enclosure within a 
motor vehicle engine that is connected to 
the oil pump by internal passages through 
which gases and vapours can flow ; 

(c) "crankcase emissions" means air contamin- 
ant or contaminants that are emitted to 
the outdoor atmosphere through any open- 
ing in the crankcase ; 

(d) "engine displacement" means the product 
expressed in cubic inches, resulting from the 
multipHcation of the total cross-sectional 
area of the cylinders of the motor vehicle 
engine as expressed in square inches, and 
the piston stroke as expressed in inches ; 

{e) " exhaust emissions ' ' means air contaminant 
or contaminants emitted to the outdoor 
atmosphere from any opening downstream 
from the exhaust port of a motor vehicle 
engine ; 

{/) "exhaust emission system" in respect of a 
motor vehicle engine includes the exhaust 
port, exhaust manifold, exhaust pipe, 
muffler, tail pipe and such systems or 
devices incorporated therein or connected 
therewith to prevent or lessen the emission of 
air contaminant or contaminants into the 
outdoor atmosphere ; 

(g) "model" in respect of a new motor vehicle 
means a class of motor vehicle designed, 
constructed and assembled by the manu- 



facturer thereof for a particular purpose 
and designated as a model by the manu- 
facturer during a model year; 

{h) "model year" means the annual period of 
manufacturing of new motor vehicles or 
new motor vehicle engines, in the twelve- 
month period designated by the manufact- 
urer, but, where the manufacturer does not 
so designate such motor vehicles and motor 
vehicle engines, the model year in respect of 
such motor vehicles and motor vehicle 
engines means the twelve-month period 
beginning on the 1st day of January of the 
year in which such manufacturing begins; 

(») "motorcycle" means a self-propelled motor 
vehicle having a seat or saddle for the use 
of the driver and designed to travel on not 
more than three wheels in contact with the 
ground and includes a bicycle with a motor 
attached and a motor scooter, but does not 
include any motor vehicle that weighs at 
least 1 ,500 pounds ; 

{]) " motor vehicle engine ' ' includes the exhaust 
emission system ; 



{k) "passenger motor vehicle" means a motor 
vehicle other than a motorcycle or a bus, 

(i) that is designed to carry an opera- 
tor and one or more passengers, 

(ii) that is manufactured during the 
1 969 model year of the manufacturer, 
and 

(iii) for which a motor vehicle permit is 
issued by the Ontario Department 
of Transport ; 

(/) "system or device" includes any modifi- 
cation of a motor vehicle having a motor 
vehicle engine, which modification pre- 
vents or lessens the emission of air contam- 
inant or contaminants into the outdoor 
atmosphere ; 



(w) "ultimate purchaser" means the person to 
whom a motor vehicle permit for the opera- 
tion of a motor vehicle or motor vehicle 
engine is issued by the Ontario Department 
of Transport. O. Reg. 403/68. s. 1 ; O. Reg. 
316/69, s. 2. 



Reg. 13 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



39 



APPLICATION 

2. This Regulation applies to, 

(a) commercial motor vehicles and passenger 
motor vehicles manufactured during the 
1969 model year and sold as 1969 model 
motor vehicles ; 

(b) new motor vehicle engines designed, con- 
structed and assembled by a manufacturer 
for installation in new passenger motor 
vehicles and new commercial motor vehicles 
manufactured during the 1969 model year 
and sold as 1969 model motor vehicles; 
and 

(c) all new motor vehicles sold, offered or 
exposed for sale as 1969 models to the 
ultimate purchaser who is a resident of 
Ontario. O. Reg. 316/69, s. 3. 

EXEMPTIONS 

3. The classes and types of new motor vehicles 
and new motor vehicle engines exempt from this 
Regulation are, 

(a) a motor vehicle engine that has an engine 
displacement of less than 50 cubic inches; 

(b) a motor vehicle having a motor vehicle 
engine that has an engine displacement of 
less than 50 cubic inches ; 

(c) a motor vehicle engine in a commercial 
motor vehicle that has a design capacity of 
more than one-half ton ; 

{d) a commercial motor vehicle that has a design 
capacity of more than one-half ton ; 

{e) a motorcycle ; 

(/) a motor vehicle or motor vehicle engine 
not intended for use on a street or highway ; 

(g) a motor vehicle or motor vehicle engine 
that is operated by a person not a resident 
of Ontario who is in Ontario temporarily; 

(A) a new motor vehicle or new motor vehicle 
engine that uses fuel other than gasohne 
for motive power ; 

{{) new motor vehicles having new motor 
vehicle engines of a specified engine displace- 
ment of which not more than fifty such new 
motor vehicles having new motor vehicle 
engines are sold or dehvered in Ontario in 
any model year ; and 

{j ) any new motor vehicle, having a new motor 
vehicle engine, forming part of a manufac- 



turer's total annual sales volume in Ontario 
where such total annual sales volume does 
not exceed 100 new motor vehicles having 
new motor vehicle engines. O. Reg. 403/68, 
S.3. 

STANDARDS FOR SYSTEMS OR DEVICES 

4. Where a system or device is installed on or 
incorporated in a new motor vehicle or a new motor 
vehicle engine, such system or device, in its opera- 
tion or function, shall meet the requirements of 
section 6 and, 

(a) shall not cause emission into the outdoor 
atmosphere of any air contaminant or con- 
taminants that would not be emitted into the 
outdoor atmosphere during the operation 
of such motor vehicle or motor vehicle 
engine if the motor vehicle or motor vehicle 
engine were not equipped with such system 
or device ; and 

{b) shall not result in any unsafe condition 
endangering persons or property. O. Reg. 
403/68, s. 4. 



CRANKCASE EMISSIONS 

5. — (1) Where a new motor vehicle or new motor 
vehicle engine is operated in Ontario, the crankcase 
of the motor vehicle engine shall be constructed in 
such manner and maintained in such condition that 
no crankcase emissions are discharged into the 
outdoor atmosphere. 

(2) The manufacturer of any new motor vehicle or 
new motor vehicle engine on or in which a system or 
device is installed or incorporated to comply with the 
requirements of subsection 1 shall test or cause to be 
tested as many motor vehicles and motor vehicle 
engines as are required to ensure that the motor 
vehicles or motor vehicle engines meet the require- 
ments of subsection 1 for not less than one year 
after sale and delivery to the ultimate purchaser. 
O. Reg. 403/68, s. 5. 



EXHAUST EMISSIONS 

6. — (1) Where a new motor vehicle or a new motor 
vehicle engine is operated in Ontario, the hydro- 
carbon and carbon monoxide content of the exhaust 
emissions shall not exceed, 

(a) where the engine displacement is at least 
50 cubic inches but not more than 100 cubic 
inches, 

(i) 410 parts per milHon by volume of 
hydrocarbons, or 

(ii) 2.3 per cent by volume of carbon 
monoxide ; 



40 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 13 



(6) where the engine displacement is more than 
100 cubic inches but not more than 140 
cubic inches, 

(i) 350 parts per million by volume of 
hydrocarbons, or 

(ii) 2.0 per cent by volume of carbon 
monoxide ; and 

(c) where the engine displacement is more than 
140 cubic inches, 

(i) 275 parts per million by volume of 
hydrocarbons, or 

(ii) 1.5 per cent by volume of carbon 
monoxide. 

(2) The requirements of subsection 1 apply to 
composite values calculated under section 8 from 
results obtained in tests of exhaust emissions from 
the operation of the new motor vehicles and new 
motor vehicle engines in accordance with the test 
procedures set out in section 7. 

(3) Where the composite value calculated under 
section 8 for a motor vehicle having a motor vehicle 
engine of a specified engine displacement does not 
exceed the amounts of hydrocarbons and carbon 
monoxide set out in subsection 1 , every motor vehicle 
having a motor vehicle engine of the same specified 
engine displacement shall be deemed to comply with 
the requirements of subsection 1. O. Reg. 403/68, 
s.6. 

7. — (1) For the purposes of this section, 

(a) where the records of a manufacturer of his 
sales in Ontario of motor vehicles in any 
year are not available or are inadequate for 
the selection of new motor vehicles and 
new motor vehicle engines for a model 
year for testing under subsection 2, the 
manufacturer shall make selections of new 
motor vehicles and new motor vehicle 
engines on the basis of his total sales of 
motor vehicles and motor vehicle engines ; 
or 

(6) where any motor vehicle manufacturer is 
subject to the terms and conditions of the 
Canada-U.S. Automotive Products Trade 
Agreement, he may, when selecting new 
motor vehicles and new motor vehicle 
engines for a model year for testing under 
subsection 2 base his selection on the 
records of his sales for the area covered by 
the Agreement. 

(2) Procedures for testing and inspecting systems 
or devices installed on or incorporated in new motor 
vehicles and new motor vehicle engines to prevent or 
lessen the emission into the outdoor atmosphere of 



any air contaminant or contaminants from the 
operation of such new motor vehicles or new 
motor vehicle engines, shall be as follows : 

1 . Where a manufacturer of new motor vehicles 
and new motor vehicle engines intends to 
sell, offer or expose for sale in any model 
year a new motor vehicle having a new 
motor vehicle engine, he shall select, from 
his manufacture of such motor vehicles and 
motor vehicle engines, for testing of exhaust 
emissions, 

(a) at least two such motor vehicles 
having motor vehicle engines of the 
same engine displacement ; and 

{b) where the probable sales volume of 
new motor vehicles having motor 
vehicle engines of a specified engine 
displacement will account for at 
least one-half of one per cent of the 
total number of new motor vehicles 
sold in Ontario in the latest preced- 
ing model year of the manufacturer 
for which sales records in Ontario 
are available, at least four new motor 
vehicles having motor vehicle en- 
gines of the same engine displace- 
ment, 

but in no case shall the total number of 
new motor vehicles having new motor 
vehicle engines be fewer than four. 

2. New motor vehicles used for the testing of 
the new motor vehicle engines shall be those 
vehicles in which the manufacturer usually 
installs such engines and shall be equipped 
as nearly as possible with transmission and 
carburetors in proportion to the number of 
comparable motor vehicles so equipped in 
the latest preceding model year of the 
manufacturer for which his sales records in 
Ontario are available. 

3. Where under paragraph 2 a manufacturer 
makes tests of new motor vehicles having 
new motor vehicle engines and installs a 
combination of engine and transmission 
system in more than one model of motor 
vehicles, only one series of tests of exhaust 
emissions is required, but, where the com- 
bination of such engine and transmission 
system in any new motor vehicle may 
increase the amount of hydrocarbons and 
carbon monoxide in the exhaust emissions, 
tests are required in respect of each motor 
vehicle. 

4. Each new motor vehicle having a new motor 
vehicle engine to be tested for amounts 
of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide in 
exhaust emissions shall be driven a distance 



Reg. 13 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



41 



of at least 4,000 miles and tests shall then 
be made for the amounts of hydrocarbons 
and carbon monoxide in the exhaust 
emissions, each test being of the motor 
vehicle running on a dynamometer and 
the motor vehicle engine for each test being 
run from a cold start through seven iden- 
tical testing cycles without stalling of the 
motor vehicle engine and with each cycle 
lasting 137 seconds and consisting of a 
series of periods of acceleration, decelera- 
tion, steady speeds and idling. 

5. The hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide 
content of the exhaust emissions referred 
to in paragraph 4 shall be measured for 
each period of the seven testing cycles and 
shall be recorded in respect of each motor 
vehicle engine so that a value, representative 
of the hydrocarbon and carbon monox- 
ide content in the exhaust emissions during 
the periods of the seven testing cycles, 
is obtained for that engine for the purposes 
of section 8. 

6. In addition to the selection of new motor 
vehicles having new motor vehicle engines 
for testing of exhaust emissions under par- 
agraphs 1 to 5, the manufacturer shall select 
not fewer than four and not more than ten 
motor vehicles for tests of durability of the 
systems or devices or of the exhaust emission 
system and in the selection he shall have 
regard to the combinations of engine dis- 
placements and transmissions, including 
automatic and manual transmission in- 
stallations, so that his selections represent 
at least 70 per cent of the number of 
motor vehicles sold by the manufacturer in 
Ontario during his latest preceding model 
year for which his sales records in Ontario 
are available, but, where his records show 
that the total number of motor vehicles 
sold by him in Ontario is less than 10 per 
cent of the total sales in Ontario of all manu- 
facturers , the combinations shall be so chosen 
that the number of motor vehicles tested 
for durability of the systems or devices or of 
the exhaust emission systems represents at 
least 50 per cent of the number of motor 
vehicles sold by the manufacturer during 
that latest preceding model year, but in no 
case shall the number of motor vehicles so 
tested be fewer than four. 



7 . Every new motor vehicle having a new motor 
vehicle engine tested under paragraph 6 shall 
be driven a distance of at least 50,000 miles 
and tested in the manner referred to in para- 
graphs 4 and 5, the tests to be carried out on 
each motor vehicle at intervals of not more 
than 4,000 miles and the results from such 
tests shall be recorded. 



8. From the results recorded under paragraph 
7 a value shall be calculated for the hydro- 
carbon and carbon monoxide content of the 
exhaust emissions and the representative 
values thus obtained shall be used in the 
calculation of the factor mentioned in para- 
graph 5 of section 8. O. Reg. 403/68, s. 7. 

8. — ( 1 ) Where recording is made under section 7 of 
results of tests for amounts of hydrocarbons and car- 
bon monoxide in exhaust emissions in respect of any 
new motor vehicle having a new motor vehicle engine, 
a composite value shall be determined under sub- 
section 2 that takes into account factors of deteriorat- 
ion in efficiency of the system or device, resulting 
from the use of that new motor vehicle and new motor 
vehicle engine, in accordance with the procedures 
under subsection 2. 

(2) The procedures for calculation of the composite 
value of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide in the 
exhaust emissions of each new motor vehicle tested 
under section 7 shall be as follows : 

1. The representative values recorded in re- 
spect of all motor vehicles and motor vehicle 
engines tested under paragraphs 7 and 8 of 
section 7 shall be averaged for the following 
mileage intervals : 

i. 4,000 to 12,000 miles. 

ii. 12,000 to 24,000 miles, 

iii. 24,000 to 36,000 miles, 

iv. 36.000 to 50.000 miles. 



2. The result of all tests for amounts of hydro- 
carbons and carbon monoxide in exhaust 
emissions recorded in respect of all motor 
vehicles and motor vehicle engines, tested 
under paragraphs 4 and 5 of section 7, shall 
be averaged. 

3. The values of the averages of the hydro- 
carbon concentrations and the carbon 
monoxide concentrations obtained under 
paragraphs 1 and 2 at the average number of 
miles travelled shall be used to obtain two 
graphs, one for hydrocarbons and one for 
carbon monoxide, by plotting the average 
hydrocarbon values and the average carbon 
monoxide values against the average number 
of miles travelled by the motor vehicle. 

4. On each of the graphs mentioned in para- 
graph 3 a straight hne shall be drawn as near 
as possible to the points plotted on the 
graphs and the line shall project a sufficient 
length to allow readings for emission levels 
at each of 4,000 miles and 50,000 miles. 



42 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 13 



The factors in respect of hydrocarbons and 
carbon monoxide for deterioration in ef- 
ficiency of the systems or devices installed 
on or incorporated in the new motor vehicles 
and new motor vehicle engines tested shall be 
in accordance with the following formula: 



exhaust emissions extrapolated to 
50.000 miles 



factor : 



exhaust emissions extrapolated to 
4,000 miles 



The results of all tests of exhaust emissions 
to determine amounts of hydrocarbons and 
carbon monoxide under paragraphs 4 and 5 
of section 7 for motor vehicles having motor 
vehicle engines of the same engine displace- 
ment shall be averaged. 

For each engine displacement the composite 
value mentioned in subsection 1 shall be 
obtained by multiplication of the hydro- 
carbon factor or the carbon monoxide 
factor described in paragraph 5, as the case 
may be, by the amount of the average 
obtained under paragraph 6. O. Reg. 
403, s. 8. 



Reg. 14 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



43 



REGULATION 14 

under The Air Pollution Control Act 



EVAPORATIVE EMISSIONS FROM NEW 
LIGHT DUTY MOTOR VEHICLES 

INTERPRETATION 

^ 1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "engine displacement" means the product, 
expressed in cubic inches, resulting from the 
multipUcation of the total cross-sectional 
area of the cyUnders of the motor vehicle 
engine, as expressed in square inches, and 
the piston stroke, as expressed in inches; 

{b) "evaporative emissions" means any hydro- 
carbon component of motor gasoline emitted 
to the outdoor atmosphere from the fuel 
tank or carburetor of a light duty motor 
vehicle ; 

(c) "exhaust emissions" means air contaminant 
or contaminants emitted to the outdoor 
atmosphere from any opening downstream 
from the exhaust port of a light duty motor 
vehicle engine ; 

{d) "gross vehicle weight" means the manu- 
facturer's gross weight rating ; 

(e) "light commercial motor vehicle" means a 
commercial motor vehicle as defined in The 
Highway Traffic Act, 

(i) that has a gross vehicle weight of not 
more than 6,000 pounds, 

(ii) that is manufactured after the com- 
mencement of the 1971 model year of 
the manufacturer, and 

(iii) for which a motor vehicle permit is 
issued by the Ontario Department of 
Transport ; 

(/) "hght duty motor vehicle" means a passen- 
ger motor vehicle or a light commercial motor 
vehicle ; 

ig) "model" in respect of a new light duty 
motor vehicle means a class of motor 
vehicle designed, constructed and assembled 
by the manufacturer thereof for a particular 
purpose and designated as a model by the 
manufacturer during a model year ; 

{h) "model year" means the annual period of 
manufacturing of new light duty motor 



vehicles or new Hght duty motor vehicle 
engines, in the twelve-month period desig- 
nated by the manufacturer, but, where the 
manufacturer does not so designate such 
motor vehicle and motor vehicle engines, the 
model year in respect of such motor vehicles 
and motor vehicle engines means the twelve- 
month period beginning on the 1st day of 
January of the year in which such manu- 
facturing begins ; 

(*') "motorcycle" means a self-propelled motor 
vehicle having a seat or saddle for the use of 
the driver and designed to travel on not 
more than three wheels in contact with the 
ground and includes a bicycle with a motor 
attached and a motor scooter, but does not 
include any motor vehicle that weighs at 
least 1,500 pounds; 

(j) "passenger motor vehicle" means a motor 
vehicle other than a motorcycle or a bus, 

(i) that is designed to carry an operator 
and one or more passengers, 

(ii) that is manufactured after the com- 
mencement of the 1971 model year of 
the manufacturer, and 

(iii) for which a motor vehicle permit is 
issued by the Ontario Department of 
Transport ; 

{k) "system or device" includes any modifi- 
cation of a motor vehicle having a motor 
vehicle engine, which modification prevents 
or lessens the emission of air contaminant 
or contaminants into the outdoor at- 
mosphere ; 

(/) "ultimate purchaser" means the person to 
whom a motor vehicle permit for the opera- 
tion of a motor vehicle or motor vehicle 
engine is issued by the Ontario Department 
of Transport. O. Reg. 18/70, s. 1. 



APPLICATION 

2. This Regulation apphes to new light duty motor 
vehicles manufactured after the commencement of the 
1971 model year and sold, offered or exposed for sale 
to or used by the ultimate purchaser who is a 
resident of Ontario. O. Reg. 18/70, s. 2. 



44 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 14 



EXEMPTIONS 

3. The classes and types of new motor vehicles 
exempt from this Regulation are, 

(a) a motor vehicle having a motor vehicle 
engine that has an engine displacement of 
less than fifty cubic inches ; 

{b) a motor vehicle that has a gross vehicle 
weight of more than 6,000 pounds ; 

(c) a motorcycle ; 

(d) a motor vehicle or motor vehicle engine not 
intended for use on a street or highway ; 

{e) a motor vehicle that is operated by a person 
not a resident of Ontario who is in Ontario 
temporarily ; 

(/) a new light duty motor vehicle that uses 
fuel other than gasoline or compressed or 
liquefied hydrocarbons for motive power ; 

(g) new light duty motor vehicles having new 
light duty motor vehicle engines of a speci- 
fied engine displacement of which not more 
than fifty such new light duty motor vehicles 
having new light duty motor vehicle engines 
are sold or dehvered in Ontario in any 
model year; and 

(A) any new hght duty motor vehicle, having a 
new light duty motor vehicle engine, form- 
ing part of a manufacturer's total annual 
sales volume in Ontario, where such total 
annual sales volume does not exceed 100 new 
light duty motor vehicle engines.. O. Reg. 
18/70, s. 3. 

EVAPORATIVE EMISSIONS 

4. — (1) For the purposes of this section, 

(a) where the records of a manufacturer of his 
sales in Ontario of new light duty motor 
vehicles in any year are not available or are 
inadequate for the selection of new light duty 
motor vehicles and new light duty motor 
vehicle engines for a model year for testing 
under subsection 5, the manufacturer shall 
make selections of new light duty motor 
vehicles and new light duty motor vehicle 
engines on the basis of his total sales of new 
light duty motor vehicles and new light duty 
motor vehicle engines ; or 

{b) where any motor vehicle manufacturer is 
subject to the terms and conditions of the 
Canada-U.S. Automotive Products Trade 
Agreement , he may, when selecting new light 
duty motor vehicles and new light duty 
motor vehicle engines for a model year for 



testing under subsection 5, base his selection 
on the records of his sales for the area covered 
by the Agreement. 

(2) Where a new light duty motor vehicle is tested 
prior to the application by a manufacturer for 
approval to sell new light duty motor vehicles in 
Ontario, the evaporative emissions from such motor 
vehicle shall not exceed 6 grams of hydrocarbons per 
test. 

(3) The requirements of subsection 2 apply to a 
composite value calculated under subsection 7 from 
results obtained in tests of evaporative emissions from 
the operation of the new light duty motor vehicles in 
accordance with the test procedures set out in para- 
graphs 3, 4 and 5 of subsection 5. 

(4) Where the'composite value calculated under 
subsection 7 for a new light duty motor vehicle having 
a new hght duty motor vehicle engine of a specified 
engine displacement does not exceed the amount of 
hydrocarbon evaporative emissions set out in sub- 
section 2, every new light duty motor vehicle having a 
new light duty motor vehicle engine of that specified 
engine displacement shall be deemed to comply with 
the requirements of subsection 2. 

(5) Procedures for selecting, testing and inspecting 
evaporative emission control systems or devices in- 
stalled on or incorporated in new light duty motor 
vehicles to prevent or lessen the emission into the 
outdoor atmosphere of evaporative emissions from the 
operation of such new Hght duty motor vehicles, shall 
be as follows : 



1. Where a manufacturer of new light duty 
motor vehicles and new hght duty motor 
vehicle engines intends to sell , offer or expose 
for sale in any model year a new light duty 
motor vehicle having a new light duty motor 
vehicle engine, he shall select , from his manu- 
facture of such light duty motor vehicles and 
light duty motor vehicle engines, for testing 
of evaporative emissions, 

{a) at least two such new light duty 
motor vehicles having new light duty 
motor vehicle engines of the same 
engine displacement ; and 

{b) where the probable sales volume of 
new light duty motor vehicles hav- 
ing new light duty motor vehicle 
engines of a specified engine displace- 
ment will account for at least one-half 
of one per cent of the total number 
of new light duty motor vehicles sold 
in Ontario in the latest preceding 
model year of the manufacturer for 
which sales records in Ontario are 
available, at least four new light duty 
motor vehicles having new light duty 



Reg. 14 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



45 



motor vehicle engines of the same 
engine displacement, 

but in no case shall the total number of 
new light duty motor vehicles having new 
light duty motor vehicle engines be fewer 
than four. 

2. The combinations of new light duty motor 
vehicles and new light duty motor vehicle 
engines selected under paragraph 1 and used 
for the testing of evaporative emissions 
shall be those combinations usually pro- 
duced for sale by the manufacturer and shall 
be equipped as nearly as possible with 
transmission and carburetors in proportion 
to the number of comparable new light duty 
motor vehicles so equipped in the latest 
preceding model year of the manufacturer 
for which his sales records in Ontario are 
available. 

3. Each new light duty motor vehicle having a 
new light duty motor vehicle engine selected 
for testing under paragraph 1 for amounts 
of evaporative emissions shall be driven a 
distance of at least 4,000 miles with all 
evaporative emission control systems or 
devices installed and operating and tests 
shall then be made for the amounts of 
evaporative emissions as described in para- 
graph 4. 

4. Each test shall consist of three parts which 
shall be performed in sequence and without 
any interruption between each part, by, 

{a) instalUng previously weighed hydro- 
carbon vapour collection devices on 
all fuel system external vents, then 
heating, by artificial means, the fuel 
in the tank of the new light duty 
motor vehicle to a temperature of 
between 82 and 86 degrees Fahren- 
heit over a period of not less than 50 
minutes and not more than 70 
minutes, after which time the new 
light duty motor vehicle shall be 
moved on to a dynamometer ; 

{b) running the new light duty motor 
vehicle on a dynamometer and the 
motor vehicle engine for each test 
being run from a cold start through 
nine identical testing cycles without 
stalling of the new light duty motor 
vehicle engine and with each cycle 
lasting 137 seconds and consisting of 
a series of periods of acceleration, 
deceleration, steady speeds and idl- 
ing ; and 

(c) permitting the new light duty motor 
vehicle to stand for a period of one 



hour at an ambient temperature 
between 76 and 86 degrees Fahren- 
heit, after which time the hydrocar- 
bon vapour collection devices shall 
be removed from the vehicle and 
sealed. 

5. The evaporative emissions referred to in 
paragraph 3 shall be obtained by reweighing 
the previously weighed hydrocarbon va- 
pour collection devices and the increase of 
weight of such devices shall be recorded in 
respect of each new light duty motor vehicle 
so that a value, expressed as grams of 
hydrocarbons per test, is obtained for that 
vehicle and engine for the purposes of sub- 
section 7. 

6. In addition to the selection of new light 
duty motor vehicles having new Hght duty 
motor vehicle engines for testing of evapor- 
ative emissions under paragraphs 2 to 5, the 
manufacturer shall select not fewer than 
four and not more than twelve new light 
duty motor vehicles for tests of durability 
of the evaporative emission control systems 
or devices and in the selection he shall have 
regard to the combinations of engine dis- 
placements and transmissions, including 
automatic and manual transmission instal- 
lations, so that his selections represent at 
least 70 per cent of the number of new light 
duty motor vehicles sold by the manu- 
facturer in Ontario during his latest preced- 
ing model year for which his sales records 
in Ontario are available, but, where his 
records show that the total number of new 
light duty motor vehicles sold by him in 
Ontario is less than 10 per cent of the total 
sales in Ontario of all new light duty motor 
vehicles of all manufacturers, the combin- 
ations shall be so chosen that the number 
of new light duty motor vehicles tested for 
durabihty of the exaporative emission con- 
trol systems or devices shall be not fewer 
than four and not more than eight and shall 
represent at least 50 per cent of the 
number of new light duty motor vehicles 
sold by the manufacturer during such model 
year. 

7. Every new light duty motor vehicle having 
a new light duty motor vehicle engine 
selected under paragraph 6 shall be driven a 
distance of at least 50,000 miles and tested 
in the manner referred to in paragraph 4, 
the tests to be carried out on each new light 
duty motor vehicle at intervals of not more 
than 4,000 miles, and the results from such 
tests shall be recorded. 

8. From the results recorded under paragraph 
7, a value shall be calculated for the 
evaporative emissions during each test for 



46 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 14 



each 4,000 mile interval for each new light 
duty motor vehicle in the manner described 
in paragraph 5 and the representative 
values thus obtained shall be used in the 
calculation of the factor mentioned in sub- 
section 7. 

(6) Where recording is made in this section of 
results of tests for amounts of evaporative emissions 
in respect of any new light duty motor vehicle hav- 
ing a new light duty motor vehicle engine, a com- 
posite value shall be determined under subsection 7 
for each engine displacement, which composite value 
takes into account factors of deterioration in efficiency 
of the evaporative emission control system or device 
installed thereon or incorporated therein, resulting 
from the use of that new light duty motor vehicle 
and new light duty motor vehicle engine, in accor- 
dance with the procedure under subsection 7. 

(7) The procedure for the calculation of the com- 
posite value of the evaporative emissions of each new 
light duty motor vehicle tested shall be as follows: 

1. For each combination of exhaust emission 
control system or device and evaporative 
emission control system or device, an eva- 
porative emission deterioration factor shall 
be determined by using the results obtained 
from the relevant new light duty motor 
vehicles and new light duty motor vehicle 
engines tested under paragraphs 7 and 8 of 
subsection 5 by, 

(a) plotting a graph for each combin- 
ation of exhaust emission control 
system or device and evaporative 
emission control system or device of 
vehicle mileage against the evapora- 
tive emission values obtained in the 
tests under paragraphs 7 and 8 of 
subsection 5 ; 

(b) drawing a straight line, by the 
method of least squares, as near as 



possible to the points plotted on each 
graph ; and 

(c) calculating the deterioration factor 
in respect of evaporative emissions 
for deterioration in efficiency for each 
combination of exhaust emission 
control system or device and evapor- 
ative emission control system or 
device in accordance with the follow- 
ing formula : 

Factor = evaporative emissions in- 
terpolated to 50,000 miles 
minus evaporative emis- 
sions interpolated to 4,000 
miles 



2. The evaporative emission test results from 
each new light duty motor vehicle tested 
under paragraphs 3, 4 and 5 of subsection 5 
shall be added to the appropriate factor 
determined in paragraph 1 of this subsection 
for the particular engine displacement of 
that new light duty motor vehicle. 

3. For each engine displacement, the results 
obtained in paragraph 2 for each new light 
duty motor vehicle in that engine displace- 
ment class shall be weighted in proportion 
to the projected sales of the new light duty 
motor vehicles represented by each test 
vehicle. 

4. For each engine displacement, the weighted 
results obtained in paragraph 3 shall be 
averaged. 

5. For each engine displacement, the evapor- 
ative emissions to be compared with the 
standard, referred to in subsection 2, shall 
be the averaged value for evaporative 
emissions obtained under paragraph 4 of 
this subsection. O. Reg, 18/70, s. 4. 



Reg. 15 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



47 



REGULATION 15 

under The Air Pollution Control Act 



GENERAL 



INTERPRETATION 



1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "air pollution episode" means an occasion 
when air contamination is at such a level 
and for such a period of time that the air 
contamination may become the cause of 
increased human sickness and mortality ; 

(b) "air pollution index" means a series of num- 
bers expressing the relative levels of air pol- 
lution and taking into consideration one or 
more air contaminants ; 

(c) "dust separation equipment" includes any 
device that separates sohd material from the 
gaseous medium in which it is carried ; 

(d) "equipment" includes apparatus, device, 
mechanism or structure ; 

(e) "fuel burning equipment" includes equip- 
ment designed to burn fuel but does not 
include an internal combustion engine ; 

{/) "incinerator" includes equipment used for 
the burning of waste ; 

ig) "odour" includes the smell of ammonia, 
hydrogen sulphide, skatol, sulphur dioxide 
or other smell that causes discomfort to 
persons ; 

{h) "smoke density' ' means the shade or opacity 
of smoke at or near the point of emission to 
the atmosphere ; 

{i) "smoke density chart" means the chart de- 
scribed in section 7 for the purpose of deter- 
mining smoke density under this Regu- 
lation. O.Reg. 133/70, s. 1. 



APPLICATION 

2. The Act and this Regulation apply to all areas 
within Ontario. O. Reg. 133/70, s. 2. 



EXEMPTIONS 

3. The following sources of air pollution are classi- 
fied and are exempt from the provisions of section 7 
of the Act requiring the obtaining of a certificate 
of approval from the Minister : 



1 . Fuel burning equipment used solely for the 
purpose of comfort heating in, 

(i) dwellings used for the housing of not 
more than three families, or 

(ii) commercial establishments having 
less than 35,000 cubic feet of space. 

2. Construction equipment for construction 
and maintenance of public roads while the 
equipment is on the road. 

3. Equipment for the preparation of food for 
on-site human consumption. 

4. A bakery suppl5dng not more than one retail 
outlet. 

5. A dry cleaning establishment serving not 
more than one retail outlet. 

6. Equipment for seeding, harvesting, fer- 
tilizing or for pest or weed control on 
agricultural lands. O. Reg. 133/70, s. 3. 



AIR POLLUTION INDEX 

4. — (1) The Department may prepare an index 
to be known as the "Air Pollution Index" for any 
area in Ontario, from time to time. 

(2) Where the air pollution index for an area 
indicates increasing air pollution that may lead to an 
air pollution episode, the Minister, in consultation 
with the Minister of Health, may order curtailment 
of the operation of sources of air pollution in the 
manner described in subsections 3 and 4. 

(3) Where the air pollution index reaches the num- 
ber 32 , designated as Air Advisory Level, and meteoro- 
logical forecasts indicate a six hour prolongation of 
atmospheric conditions conducive to sustained or 
increased air pollution levels, the Minister may require 
owners or operators of sources of air pollution to make 
preparation for the curtailment of such operations 
as are specified by the Minister. 

(4) Where the air pollution index reaches the num- 
ber 50, designated as First Air Pollution Alert, and 
meteorological forecasts indicate a six hour prolonga- 
tion of atmospheric conditions conducive to sustained 
or increased air pollution levels, the Minister may 
require owners or operators of sources of air pollution 
to curtail such operations as are specified by the 
Minister. O. Reg. 133/70, s. 4. 



48 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 15 



CONTROL OF AIR CONTAMINANTS 

5. — (1) The standards for concentrations of air 
contaminants from stationary sources of air pollution 
at a point of impingement are prescribed in Schedule 
1. 

(2) For the air contaminant mentioned in column 
1 , the amount thereof in the atmosphere at the point 
of impingement measured or calculated in accordance 
with column 2 shall not be greater than the amount 
shown in column 3 for the period of time shown in 
column 4 of Schedule 1 . 

(3) No person shall operate or cause to be operated 
any stationary source of air pollution in a manner 
that does not comply with the standards prescribed 
in Schedule 1. O. Reg. 133/70, s. 5. 

6. No person shall cause or permit to be caused 
the emission of any air contaminant to such extent or 
degree as may, 

(a) cause discomfort to persons ; 

(b) cause loss of enjoyment of normal use of 
property ; 

(c) interfere with normal conduct of business ; or , 



(d) cause damage to property. 
s.6. 



O. Reg. 133/70, 



7. — (1 ) The Department shall prepare a chart to be 
known as the "Smoke Density Chart of the Province 
of Ontario". 

(2) The smoke density chart shall be prepared by 
the recording, in five consecutive areas on the chart, 
of fine black dots or lines evenly spaced on a white 
background in such manner that, 

(a) approximately 20 per cent of the space in 
the first area is black, such area to be 
designated density No. 1 ; 

{b) approximately 40 per cent of the space in 
the second area is black, such area to be 
designated density No. 2 ; 

(c) approximately 60 per cent of the space in 
the third area is black, such area to be 
designated density No. 3 ; 

(d) approximately 80 per cent of the space in 
the fourth area is black, such area to be 
designated density No. 4 ; and 

(e) approximately 100 per cent of the space in 
the fifth area is black, such area to be 
designated density No. 5. 

(3) For the purpose of enforcing the Act and this 
Regulation, no person other than a provincial officer 



shall determine smoke density by a smoke density 
chart. 

(4) Where the 46nsity or opacity of smoke is 
determined, the smoke is deemed to be of the density 
on the smoke density chart that it most closely re- 
sembles and to have the density number designated 
on the chart for such density. O. Reg. 133/70, s. 7. 

8. — (1) Subject to subsections 2 and 3, no person 
shall cause or permit to be caused the emission of 
smoke having a density or opacity greater than 
density No. 1. 

(2) For a period of not more than four minutes 
in the aggregate in each half hour period, smoke may 
have a density or opacity not exceeding density No. 2. 

(3) Where a new fire is started in any fuel burning 
equipment, the smoke may have a density or opacity 
not exceeding density No. 3 for a period or periods of 
not more than three minutes in the aggregate in each 
quarter hour period. O. Reg. 133/70, s. 8. 

9. Where at any stationary source of air pollution 
a failure to operate in the normal manner or a change 
in operating conditions occurs, or a shut-down of the 
source or part thereof is made for some purpose, 
resulting in the emission of air contaminants that 
may result in quantities or concentrations in excess 
of those allowed in sections 5, 6 and 8, 

(a) the owner or operator of the source of air 
pollution shall, 

(i) immediately notify a provincial 
officer and furnish him with parti- 
culars of such failure, change or shut- 
down, and 

(ii) furnish the provincial officer with the 
particulars in writing, as soon as is 
practicable , of such failure , change or 
shut-down ; and 

(b) the provincial officer, where he considers it 
advisable, may authorize, in writing, the 
continuance of such operation for such 
period of time as he considers reasonable 
in the circumstances and may impose upon 
the owner or operator such terms and 
conditions for such continued operation 
as he considers necessary in the circum- 
stances. O. Reg. 133/70, s. 9, amended. 

10. — (1) No person shall burn or permit to be 
burned in any fuel burning equipment or incinerator 
any fuel or waste except the fuel or waste for the 
burning of which the equipment or incinerator was 
designed. 

(2) No person shall burn or permit to be burned in 
any fuel burning equipment or incinerator any fuel or 
waste at a greater rate than that rate for which the 



Reg. 15 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



49 



equipment or incinerator was designed. O. Reg. 
133/70, s. 10. 

11. — (1) Subject to subsection 2, no person shall 
burn or permit to be burned any material in an open 
fire that may contribute to air pollution except with 
the permission and under the direction of a provincial 
officer. 

(2) A p)erson may burn or permit to be burned 
material in an open fire where the fire is for recreation- 
al purposes, provided that the fire does not con- 
tribute to air pollution. O. Reg. 133/70, s. 11. 

12. No person shall store, handle or transport any 
solid, liquid or gaseous material or substance in such 
manner that an air contaminant is released to the 
atmosphere. O. Reg. 133/70, s. 12. 

13. Except with the permission and direction of a 
provincial officer, no person shall operate or cause to 
be operated an incinerator other than a municipally 



operated incinerator at any time other than between 
the hours of 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. during any day. 
O. Reg. 133/70, s. 13. 

14. The Minister may require the installation of 
such devices or methods as are necessary to record the 
periods of operation of process, combustion or control 
equipment, which records shall be available to a 
provincial officer. O. Reg. 133/70, s. 14. 

15. No person shall operate fuel burning equip- 
ment designed for the burning of solid fuel in suspen- 
sion unless dust separating equipment is installed and 
operating in conjunction with the fuel burning equip- 
ment. O. Reg. 133/70, s. 15. 

AIR QUALITY 

16. For the purpose of attaining a high quahty 
environment, the Minister shall use the values pre- 
scribed in Schedule 2 for controlling ambient air 
quality. O. Reg. 133/70, s. 16. 



Schedule 1 

STANDARDS FOR EMITTED CONTAMINANTS 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Column 4 


Item 










Name of Contaminant 


Units of Concentration 


Amount of Concentration 
at point of impingement 


Period of Time 


' 


Ammonia 


parts of-ammonia per one 
million parts of air by 
volume 


5.0 average 


30 minutes 


2 


Beryllium 


micrograms of beryllium 
per cubic metre of air 


0.01 average 


30 minutes 


3 


Bromine 


parts of bromine per one 
million parts of air by 
volume 


0.01 average 


30 minutes 


4 


Cadmium Oxide 


micrograms of cadmium 
oxide per cubic metre of 
air 


10 average 


30 minutes 


5 


Carbon Bisulphide 


parts of carbon bisulphide 
per one million parts of 
air by volume 


0.15 average 


30 minutes 


6 


Carbon Monoxide 


parts of carbon monoxide 
per one million parts of 
air by volume 


5.0 average 


30 minutes 



50 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 15 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Column 4 


Item 










Name of Contaminant 


Units of Concentration 


Amount of Concentration 
at point of impingement 


Period of Time 


7 


Chlorine 


parts of chlorine per one 
miUion parts of air by 
volume 


0.1 average 


30 minutes 


8 


Dustfall 


tons of dustfall per square 
mile 


15 total 


30 days 


9 


Fluorides 


parts of fluorides per one 
billion parts of air by 
volume 


5.0 average 


30 minutes 


10 


Hydrogen Chloride 


parts of hydrogen chloride 
per one million parts of 
air by volume 


0.04 average 


30 minutes 


'' 


Hydrogen Cyanide 


parts of hydrogen cyan- 
ide per one million parts 
of air by volume 


1.0 average 


30 minutes 


12 


Hydrogen Sulphide 


parts of hydrogen sul- 
phide per one million 
parts of air by volume 


0.03 average 


30 minutes 


13 


Iron 


microgram^ ul iron per 
cubic metre of air 


10 average 


30 minutes 


14 


Lead 


micrograms of lead per 
cubic metre of air 


20 average 


30 minutes 


15 


Lime 


micrograms of lime per 
cubic metre of air 


20 average 


30 minutes 


16 


Nitric Acid 


micrograms of nitric acid 
per cubic metre of air 


65 average 


30 minutes 


17 


Nitrogen Oxides 


parts of nitrogen oxides 
per one million parts of 
air by volume 


0.25 average 


30 minutes 


18 


Silver 


micrograms of silver per 
cubic metre of air 


1 average 


30 minutes 


19 


Sulphur Dioxide 


parts of sulphur dioxide 
per one million parts of 
air by volume 


0.3 average 


30 minutes 


20 


Suspended particulate 
matter 


micrograms of suspended 
particulate matter per cu- 
bic metre of air 


100 average 


30 minutes 



O. Reg. 133/70, Sched. 1. 



Reg. 15 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



51 



Schedule 2 

CRITERIA FOR DESIRABLE AMBIENT AIR QUALITY 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Column 4 














Name of Contaminant 


Units of Concentration 


Amount of Concentration 
in Ambient Air or Forage 


Period of Time 


' 


Beryllium 


micrograms of beryllium 
per cubic metre of air 


0.01 average 


24 hours 


2 


Carbon Monoxide 


parts of carbon monoxide 
per one million parts of 
air by volume 


40 average 

15 average 

8 average 


1 hour 

8 hours 

24 hours 


3 


Dustfall 


tons of dustfall per square 
mile 


20 total 
13 monthly 
average 


30 days 
1 year 


4 


Fluorides 


parts of fluorides per one 
billion parts of air by 
volume 


1.0 average 
0.5 average 


24 hours 
30 days 


5 


Fluorides in forage for 
consumption by live 
stock 


parts of fluorides per one 
million parts forage (dry 
weight) 


35 total 


individual 
sample 


6 


Fluoridation 


micrograms of fluorides 
per 100 square centi- 
metres 


40 total 


30 days 


7 


Hydrogen Sulphide 


parts of hydrogen sul- 
phide per one million 
parts of air by volume 


0.02 average 


1 hour 


8 


Lead 


micrograms of lead per 
cubic metre of air 


15 average 
10 average 


24 hours 
30 days 


9 


Lime 


micrograms of lime per 
cubic metre of air 


10 average 


24 hours 


10 


Oxidants 


parts of oxidants per one 
million parts of air by 
volume 


0.10 average 
0.03 average 


1 hour 
24 hours 


11 


Oxides of Nitrogen 


parts of oxides of nitro- 
gen per one million parts 
of air by volume 


0.20 average 
0.10 average 


1 hour 
24 hours 


12 


Soiling 


coefficient of haze per 
1000 feet of air 


1.0 average 
0.45 average 


24 hours 
1 year 


13 


Sulphation 


milligrams of sulphur tri- 
oxide per 100 square cen- 
timetres 


0.4 average 
per day 


30 days 



52 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 15 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Column 4 


Item 














Amount of Concentration 






Name of Contaminant 


Units of Concentration 


in Ambient Air or Forage 


Period of Time 


14 


Sulphur Dioxide 


parts of sulphur dioxide 


0.25 average 


1 hour 






per one million parts of 


0.10 average 


24 hours 






air by volume 


0.02 average 


1 year 


15 


Suspended particulate 


micrograms of suspended 


90 average 


24 hours 




matter 


particulate matter per 
ruhir metre of air 


60 geometric 
mean 


1 year 



O. Reg. 133/70, Sched. 2. 



Reg. 16 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



53 



REGULATION 16 

under The Air Pollution Control Act 



GRANTS 



1. — (1) In this section, "approved project" means 
a project that has for its purpose research and the 
training of persons in the field of air pollution, and 
that has been approved by the Minister. 



(2) For the purpose of subclause i of clause / of 
section 2 of the Act, the amount of the grant for an 
approved project payable to a university and to 
other organizations shall be equal to the expenses 
incurred by the university or other organization for 
salaries, equipment, travel and other necessary 
expenses incurred in carrying out an approved 
project. 



(3) An applicant for a grant shall furnish such 
information as the Minister may require. O. Reg. 
85/69, s.l. 



2. — (1) In this section, "expenses incurred" means 
expenses incurred by a municipality in the adminis- 
tration and enforcement of air pollution control 
by-laws. 

(2) For the purpose of subclause ii of clause / of 
section 2 of the Act, the amount of the grant payable 
to a municipality shall be, 

(a) in the case of the cities of Guelph, 
Hamilton, Oshawa and Windsor, 75 per cent 
of the expenses incurred ; 

(b) in the case of the City of Brantford and 
the towns of Brampton, Burlington and 
Oakville, 50 per cent of the expenses in- 
curred ; and 

(c) in the case of the City of London, 25 per 
cent of the expenses incurred. O. Reg. 
85/69. s. 2. 



54 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



Reg. 17 



REGULATION 17 

under The Air Pollution Control Act 



SULPHUR CONTENT OF FUELS 

INTERPRETATION 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "fuel" includes any fuel used for heating, 
generating steam or electricity, or for in- 
dustrial processes ; 

{b) "sulphur content" means the amount of 
sulphur in the fuel as determined by standard 
methods of sampling and testing and in the 
case of coal shall be determined as organic 
sulphur. O. Reg. 374/70, s. 1. 

APPLICATION 

2. This Regulation applies to The Municipality of 
MetropoHtan Toronto. O. Reg. 374/70, s. 2. 

3. Subject to section 4, no person shall use for fuel, 
or sell or offer for sale, any fuel referred to in column 
1 of the Schedule if the sulphur content of the fuel is 
greater than the maximum sulphur content set 
opposite thereto, 

(a) in column 2 of the Schedule, from and includ- 
ing the 1st day of January in the year 1971 
to and including the 31st day of December 
in the year 1971 ; 

(6) in column 3 of the Schedule, from and includ- 
ing the 1st day of January in the year 1972 
to and including the 31st day of December 
in the year 1972 ; and 



(c) in column 4 of the Schedule, from and in- 
cluding the 1st day of January in the year 
1973 to and including the 31st day of 
December, in the year 1973. O. Reg. 
374/70, s. 3. 



4. A fuel having a higher sulphur content than the 
maximum sulphur content prescribed for that fuel in 
the Schedule may be used for fuel, or sold or offered 
for sale to a purchaser if the user or purchaser has 
applied for and obtained a certificate of approval, 
under section 7 of the Act, for methods or devices 
that will result in emissions of sulphur dioxide no 
greater than if the fuel contained the sulphur content 
prescribed in the Schedule. O. Reg. 374/70, s. 4. 



5. Every supplier of fuel, 

{a) shall report to the Air Management Branch 
of the Department the sulphur content of 
the fuels supplied by him ; and 

(6) shall specify to the Air Management Branch 
of the Department the source or sources of 
supply of the fuels suppUed by him. 

at such times and in such manner as the Air Manage- 
ment Branch of the Department specifies. O. Reg. 
374/70, s. 6. 



6. Every supplier of fuel shall, upon the request of 
a provincial officer, provide dupUcate samples of any 
fuel supphed by him. O.Reg. 374/70, s. 7. 



Reg. 17 



AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 



55 



Schedule 



Fuel 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Column 4 


Grade or 

type of 

Fuel 


Maximum 
Sulphur 
Content 


Maximum 
Sulphur 
Content 


Maximum 
Sulphur 
Content 


Oil 


1 


0.5% 


0.50/0 


0.5o/„ 




2 


0.50/0 


0.50/0 


0.50/0 




4 


1.50/0 


1.50/0 


1.50/0 




5 


1-9% 


1.750/0 


1.5% 




6B 


2.00/0 


1.750/0 


1.5% 




6C 


2.00/0 


1.750/0 


1.50/0 


Coal 


Bituminous 


2.00/0 


1.750/0 


1-5% 



O. Reg. 374/70, Sched. 



Reg. 18 



ANATOMY 



57 



REGULATION 18 

under The Anatomy Act 



GENERAL 



1. The following are designated as schools for the 
purposes of the Act : 

1. Queen's University — Faculty of Medicine 

2. University of Ottawa — Faculty of Medicine 

3. University of Toronto — Faculty of Medicine 

4. University of Western Ontario — Faculty of 
Medicine 

5. Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College 

6. University of Guelph — Department of 
Anatomy (Section of Human Anatomy) 

7. Mc Master University — Faculty of Medicine 

O. Reg. 310/68, s. 1. 



2. In accordance with section 8 of the Act, each 
school shall keep the following records : 

1. Every certificate for anatomical dissection 
of an unclaimed body, in Form 2, received 
by the school. 

2. Every certificate for anatomical dissection 
of a donated body, in Form 3, received 
by the school. 

3. A copy of every receipt for a body, in Form 
4, completed by the school. 

4. Every notice of disposal of a body, in Form 
7, completed by the school. 

5. Every identification tag, in Form 8, attached 
to a body received by the school. 

6. Every request to bequeath a body, in Form 
1 1 , received by the school. 

7. The burial permit required in connection 
with the disposal of a body under The 
Vital Statistics Act. 

8. An antero posterior photograph and a lateral 
photograph of the face of each unclaimed 
body received by the school. 

9. A complete set of finger-prints of each un- 
claimed body received by the school. 

O. Reg. 310/68, s. 2. 



3. Every local inspector shall ensure that a 
donated body information report, in Form 1, is com- 
pleted and kept on file in his office. O. Reg. 310/68, 
s.3. 

4. Where a local inspector has caused an un- 
claimed body under his control to be dehvered to 
a school, be shall complete and forward to the school 
a certificate for anatomical dissection of an un- 
claimed body, in Form 2. O. Reg. 310/68, s. 4. 

5. Where a local inspector has been notified, under 
subsection 2 of section 5 of the Act, of a body received 
for the purposes of anatomical dissection, the local 
inspector shall, when he has obtained the partic- 
ulars he requires, complete and forward to the school 
a certificate for anatomical dissection of a donated 
body, in Form 3. O. Reg. 310/68, s. 5. 

6. Every local inspector shall require the pro- 
fessor of anatomy, or his agent, of a school to which 
an unclaimed or donated body has been delivered, 
to complete in duphcate a receipt for a body, in Form 
4, and return a copy of the receipt to the local in- 
spector. O. Reg. 310/68. s. 6. 

7. Every local inspector or coroner, as the case 
may be, shall ensure that there is completed and 
filed in his office a report of an unclaimed body, in 
Form 5, in respect of every unclaimed body under 
the control of the local inspector or coroner, as the 
case may be. O. Reg. 310/68, s. 7. 

8. Every local inspector or coroner, as the case 
may be, shall complete and forward to the clerk of 
the municipal corporation a report and warrant to 
dispose of an unclaimed body, in Form 6, in respect 
of every unclaimed body to be disposed of at the 
expense of the municipal corporation under section 
1 1 of the Act. O. Reg. 310/68, s. 8. 

9. The professor of anatomy, or his agent, of a 
school shall complete and forward to the general 
inspector a notice of disposal of a body, in Form 
7, in respect of every body to be disposed of by the 
school. O. Reg. 310/68, s. 9. 

10. Every local inspector shall ensure that there is 
attached to the neck and to a toe of each donated 
and of each unclaimed body an identification tag, 
in Form 8, before the body is dehvered to a school. 
O. Reg. 310/68, s. 10. 

11. Every local inspector or coroner, as the case 
may be, shall complete and forward to the general 
inspector a report of delivery or disposal of a body, 
in Form 9, 



58 



ANATOMY 



Reg. 18 



(a) for each donated body and for each un- 
claimed body authorized by the local in- 
spector to be deUvered to a school; and 

(b) for each unclaimed body requested by the 
local inspector or coroner, as the case may 
be, to be disposed of by a municipal cor- 
poration. O. Reg. 310/68, s. 11 . 

12. Every local inspector or coroner, as the case 
may be, shall complete and forward to the person in 
charge of a pubhc morgue or private morgue, as the 
case may be, for the municipality in which a body is 
found an order for storage of a body, in Form 10. 

O. Reg. 310/68, s. 12. 

13. Where a person wishes to bequeath his body to 
a school, the person, or, where the person has died, 
the executor or next-of-kin of the deceased, shall 
complete and forward to the school a request to 
bequeath a body, in Form 11. O. Reg. 310/68, 
s. 13. 



14. The general inspector shall submit to the 
Minister of Justice and Attorney General, on or before 
the 30th day of March in each year, an annual report 
for the preceding year. O. Reg. 310/68, s. 14. 

15. The general inspector shall ensure that a 
register of all bodies reported to him under the Act and 
this Regulation is kept. O. Reg. 310/68, s. 15. 

16. There shall be paid to a local inspector by a 
school a fee of $20 for each body dehvered to the 
school by the inspector. O. Reg. 310/68, s. 16. 

17. There shall be paid to a local inspector or a 
coroner by a municipality a fee of $20 for each body 
disposed of by the municipal corporation under section 
1 1 of the Act. O. Reg. 310/68, s. 17. 

JJj^n or before the 31st day of January in each 
year, each school shall pay to the general inspector a 
fee of $200. O. Reg. 310/68, s. 18. 



Form 1 

The Anatomy Act 
DONATED BODY INFORMATION REPORT 



1. Name of deceased. 



(surname) 
2. Last place of residence of deceased, . . 



(given names) 



(street or rural route) 



(city, town or village) 



(county, etc., or territorial division) 



3. Death reported on, 



at by 

(time a.m. or p.m.) 



(day) (month) (year) 

(surname) (given names) (address) 



4. Age of deceased 

5. Sex of deceased 

6. Birthplace of deceased. 

7. Date of death 



(day) 



(month) 



(year) 



8. Cause of death 

9. School of Anatomy to which body delivered, 
10. Date body delivered to School of Anatomy, 



11. Burial Permit obtained at. 



(day) (month) (year) 

(place) (date) 



Reg. 18 ANATOMY 59 

12. Information regarding deceased obtained from 

(name in full) 

(address) 
Dated at , this day of , 19 . . . 



(Local Inspector of Anatomy, or his agent) 
at 



(address) 

O. Reg. 310/68, Form 1. 
Form 2 

The Anatomy Act 

CERTIFICATE FOR ANATOMICAL DISSECTION OF AN UNCLAIMED BODY 

To the School of Anatomy at 

This is to certify that I have received all the necessary details and information pertaining to the 

unclaimed body of 

(surname) (given names) 

Sex of deceased 

Age of deceased 

Birthplace of deceased 

Last place of residence of deceased 



(street or rural route) 



(city, town or village) (county, etc., or territorial division) 

And this is your authority to proceed with the dissection of the body in accordance with The Anatomy Act, 
if the body is not reclaimed before the expiration of the fourteen-day period required by subsection 1 of section 
5 of The Anatomy Act. 

Dated at , this day of , 19... 

(Local Inspector of Anatomy, or his agent) 



at 

(address) 

O. Reg. 310/68, Form 2. 
Form 3 

The Anatomy Act 

CERTIFICATE FOR ANATOMICAL DISSECTION OF A DONATED BODY 

To the School of Anatomy at 

This is to certify that I have received all the necessary details and information pertaining to the 

donated body of 

(surname) (given names) 



60 



ANATOMY 



Reg. 18 



Sex of deceased 

Age of deceased 

Birthplace of deceased 

Last place of residence of deceased, 



(street or rural route) 



(city, town or village) (county, etc., or territorial division) 
and this is your authority to proceed with the dissection of the body in accordance with The Anatomy Act. 
Dated at , this day of , 19. .. 



(Local Inspector of Anatomy, or his agent) 
at 



(address) 

O. Reg. 310/68, Form 3. 



Form 4 

The Anatomy Act 
RECEIPT FOR A BODY 



To the Local Insj)ector of Anatomy at . 



(address in full) 
On the day of , 19. . . , I received the unclaimed body of 



(surname) 



(given names) 



the donated body of. 



(surname) 



Sex of deceased 

Age of deceased 

Birthplace of deceased 

Last place of residence of deceased. 



(given names) 



(street or rural route) 



(city, town or village) 

for use in the School of Anatomy at 

from 



(county, etc., or territorial division) 



(surname) 



(given names) 



Reg. 18 ANATOMY 61 

Local Inspector of Anatomy. 

Dated at , this day of , 19 . . . 

(Professor of Anatomy, or his agent) 

(name of School of Anatomy) 

O. Reg. 310/68. Form 4. 
Note : A copy of this Receipt is to be returned to the Local Inspector of Anatomy. 

Form 5 

The Anatomy Act 
REPORT OF UNCLAIMED BODY 

1 . Name of deceased 

(surname) (given names) 

2. Last place of residence of deceased 

(street or rural route) 

(city, town or village) (county, etc., or territorial division) 

3. Death reported by 

(surname) (given names) (address in full) 

4. Age of deceased 

5. Sex of deceased 

6. Body is located at 

(address of public or private morgue) 

7. Date deceased was admitted to hospital 

(day) (month) (year) 

8. Date of death 

(day) (month) (year) 

9. Place of death 

(hospital, home for aged, etc.) 

10. Cause of death 

1 1 . Death reported to a coroner : yes □ no D 

12. Autopsy: yes D no D 

13. Name of coroner 

(surname) (given names) (address in full) 

14. Death certificate signed by 

(name and address in full) 



62 ANATOMY 


Reg. 18 


15. Physical deformities: yes D no D If "yes", describe deformities 


16 Description of clothing and other personal belongings 





17. Disposal of personal belongings 

18. Remarks regarding body: (Where a police officer was notified of the death, give the police officer's name, 
telephone number and detachment; also describe what steps were taken to locate next-of-kin, and what 
other information has been obtained.) 



19. Body was delivered to the School of Anatomy at. 
to 



(person contacted) 

by 



(name of person delivering body) 

on 

(date body delivered) 

or 
body was disposed of by the Municipal Corporation of 

(name of municipality) 



on 

(date body disposed of) 

Dated at , this day of , 19. 



(Local Inspector of Anatomy, or his agent, 
or Coroner) 



at 

(address) 

O. Reg. 310/68, Form 5. 

Note : Body must not be delivered to a School of Anatomy until a period of twenty-four hours has expired. 

Form 6 

The Anatomy Act 

REPORT AND WARRANT TO DISPOSE OF AN UNCLAIMED BODY 

To the Municipal Corporation of 

1. Name of deceased 

(surname) (given names) 

2. Last place of residence of deceased 



(street or rural route) 
(city, town or village) (county, etc., or territorial division) 



Reg. 18 



ANATOMY 



63 



3. Age of deceased , 

4. Sex of deceased 

5. Body of deceased is located at 



6. Death reported by. 



(hospital, pubHc or private morgue, etc.) 
(surname) (given names) 



7. Date of death 



8. Place of death. 



(street or rural route) (city, town or village, etc.) 

(day) (month) (year) 

(hospital, home for aged, etc.) 
9. Autopsy: yes D no D 

10. Cause of death 

1 1 . Remarks regarding body 

Under the authority granted to me by section 11 of The Anatomy Act, I hereby direct you to dispose of this 

body at the expense of the Municipal Corporation of 

Dated at , this day of , 19 . . . 



(Local Inspector of Anatomy, or his agent, 
or Coroner) 



at. 



(address) 



O. Reg. 310/68, Form 6. 



Form 7 

The Anatomy Act 
NOTICE OF DISPOSAL OF A BODY 
To the General Inspector of Anatomy : 

This is to inform you that the body of ... . 



(surname) 



(given names) 



Sex of deceased 

Age of deceased 

Birthplace of deceased 

Last place of residence of deceased, 



(street or rural route) 



(city, town or village) 



(county, etc., or territorial division) 



64 



ANATOMY 



Reg. 18 



will be disposed of by burial D 

cremation n 

at 



(place where body will be disposed of) 



(day) (month) 
to conform with section 7 of The Anatomy Act. 
Dated at , this day of 



(year) 



,19.... 



(Professor of Anatomy, or his agent) 

(name of School of Anatomy) 

O. Reg. 310/68, Form 7. 



Body of. 



Form 8 

The Anatomy Act 
IDENTIFICATION TAG 



Date. 



19. 



(surname) 
of the of . 



(given names) 



AT. 



DELIVERED TO THE SCHOOL OF ANATOMY 



BY 



(name of School of Anatomy) 



AT. 



(Local Inspector of Anatomy) 
(street or rural route) (city, town or village) 



(county, etc., or territorial division) 



Note: DONATED OR UNCLAIMED BODIES: 

1. Identification tags shall be attached, before delivery, to the neck and to a toe. 

2. Finger prints and photographs shall be taken immediately of unclaimed bodies by the School of 
Anatomy. O. Reg. 310/68, Form 8. 



Reg. 18 ANATOMY 65 

Form 9 

The Anatomy Act 
REPORT OF DELIVERY OR DISPOSAL OF A BODY 
To the General Inspector of Anatomy : 

On the day of , 19 ... , I authorized the donated Q 

(date) (month) body of 

unclaimed D 

(surname) (given names) 
Sex of deceased 

Age of deceased 

Birthplace of deceased 

Last place of residence of deceased 



(street or rural route) 



(city, town or village) (county, etc., or territorial division) 
to be delivered to the School of Anatomy at 



or to be disposed of at the expense of the Municipal Corporation of 

Datedat , this day of , 19. 



(Local Inspector of Anatomy, or his agent, 
or Coroner) 



at 

(address) 

O. Reg. 310/68, Form 9. 
Form 10 
The Anatomy Act 
ORDER FOR STORAGE OF A BODY 
To the person in charge of the public or private morgue at 



In accordance with subsection 1 of section 12 of The Anatomy Act, I hereby order you to store the body of 
(surname) (given names) 



Sex of deceased 

Age of deceased 

Last known address of deceased. 



(street or rural route) 



66 



ANATOMY 



Reg. 18 



(city, town or village) (county, etc., or territorial division) 
until such time as other arrangements are made for disposal of the body. 
Dated at , this day of , 19 . . . 



(Local Inspector of Anatomy, or his agent, 
or Coroner) 



O. Reg. 310/68, Form 10. 



Form 11 

The Anatomy Act 
REQUEST TO BEQUEATH A BODY 

To the School of Anatomy at 

♦1. I hereby wish to bequeath my body to the School of Anatomy at 

or to any other School of Anatomy for purposes of medical education and research. 
Dated at , this day of , 19. .. 



(signature of person wishing to 
bequeath body) 



(witness) 



**2. I, being the next-of-kin or executor of the deceased, wish to comply with the request indicated above. 

I do D do not D wish a private burial Q cremation n at the expense of the estate of the 

deceased. 
Dated at , this day of , 19. .. 



(witness) 



(signature of next-of-kin or executor) 



(address) 



(telephone number) 
♦This Form should be completed by you when your decision is made. At the time of death it should be 

forwarded to the School of Anatomy at by your executor or next-of-kin. 

♦♦This part of Form should be completed by the deceased's next-of-kin or executor at the time of death. 

O. Reg. 310/68, Form 11. 



Reg. 19 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



67 



REGULATION 19 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



ALIGNMENT AND BRAKES MECHANIC 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "alignment and brakes mechanic" means a 
person engaged in the repair and mainten- 
ance of motor vehicles who, 

(i) tests for and corrects faulty align- 
ment of wheels, axles, frames and 
steering mechanisms including wheel 
balancing, and 

(ii) adjusts, disassembles, repairs and 
reassembles foundation brake 
systems, and controls and compon- 
ents pertaining to them ; 

(b) "certified trade" means the trade of align- 
ment and brakes mechanic ; 

(c) "motor vehicle" means a vehicle propelled 
by an internal combustion engine, or 
operated or controlled from a vehicle pro- 
pelled by an internal combustion engine, 
that is registered for use on a highway under 
The Highway Traffic Act and is used 
primarily for the transport of persons, 
equipment or goods, but does not include a 
vehicle, 

(i) operated only on rails, 

(ii) used for transportation solely within 
an employer's actual place of busi- 
ness, or 

(iii) used for farming operations but not 
used for carrying a load. O. Reg. 
100/69, s. 1. 

2. The trade of ahgnment and brakes mechanic is 
designated as a certified trade for the purposes of the 
Act. O. Reg. 100/69, s. 2. 

3. An apprentice training program for the certi- 
fied trade is established and shall consist of, 

{a) training and instruction at full-time educa- 
tional day classes provided at a College of 
Applied Arts and Technology or in classes 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto ; and 

{b) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by an employer of the apprentice, 

in the subjects contained in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 100/69, s. 3. 



4. — (1) Subject to subsections 2 and 3, an ap- 
prentice shall complete three periods of training and 
instruction of 1800 hours per period. 

(2) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma or has 
Ontario Grade 12 standing in EngHsh, Mathematics 
and Science or has such other academic qualification 
that, in the opinion of the Director, is equivalent 
thereto, he shall complete three periods of training 
and instruction of 1600 hours per period. 

(3) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma 
majoring in auto mechanics or has such other acade- 
mic quahfication that, in the opinion of the Director, 
is equivalent thereto, he shall complete three 
periods of training and instruction of 1200 hours per 
period. O. Reg. 100/69, s. 4. 



5. Any person who, 

{a ) applies in the prescribed form for apprentice- 
ship in the certified trade ; and 

(b) becomes an apprentice in the certified trade 
within three months after commencing to 
work in that trade, 

is exempt from subsection 2 of section 10 of the Act. 
O. Reg. 100/69, s. 5. 



6. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the certi- 
fied trade whether for his regular daily hours or for 
hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall not be 
less than, 

{a) 50 per cent during the first period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 

{b) 70 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; and 

(c) 90 per cent during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction, 

of the average rate of wages for journeymen employed 
the employer in that trade, or where the 



by 



by the employer in that trade, or where the 
employer is the only journeyman employed, of the 
average rate of wages for journeymen in the area. 
O. Reg. 100/69, s. 6. 



7. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
are the subjects set out in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 100/69, s. 7. 



68 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 19 



Schedule 

ALIGNMENT AND BRAKES MECHANIC 

Part 1 

In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Mathematics 


Arithmetic 
Geometry 


Addition, subtraction and division of whole numbers 
and fractions, ratio and proportion, areas and volumes. 

Lines, planes and angles. 


2 


Science 


Physics 
Mechanics 


Basic laws and principles, formulae. 
(Given as required in shop instruction.) 


3 


English 


Basic Usage and 

Business 

Communications 


Trade terminology and usage. Letter and report 
writing. Work and parts orders. Interpretation and 
use of manufacturers' manuals. 


4 


Drafting 


Basic Drafting and 
Interpretation 


Preparation of elementary working drawings and 
dimensioned sketches of automotive components. 
Interpretation of exploded drawings, electrical and 
hydraulic circuits and schematics used in manu- 
facturers' manuals. 


5 


General Shop 
Practice 


Safety 

Hand Tools 

Power Tools 
Benchwork 

Measuring 
Instruments 


Safety rules and safe operating procedures. First 
aid. Fire prevention. Use and maintenance of fire- 
fighting equipment. 

Handling of gasoline, oils and cleaning solvents. 
Danger of carbon monoxide fumes. Correct use ot 
lifting and hoisting equipment. Good housekeeping. 

Selection and use of hammers, punches, chist'ls. 
pliers, wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers, hacksaws. 

files, drifts, scrapers, snips, clamps, drill bits, reamers, 
vises, taps and dies. Stud extractors. Hones. 

Use and care of portable air and electric drills, 
impact tools, grinders and disc sanders. 

Cutting with hacksaw, filing, scraping, drilling, use 
of drill press. Use of bench grinder; Grinding of 
drill bits, chisels, etc. Fitting bushings, honing, 
cutting and flaring tubing. Soldering, gasket making. 
Oxy-acetylene and arc welding and cutting. Brazing 
techniques. Care and maintenance of welding equip- 
ment. 

Use of rules, straight edges and squares. Feeler 
gauges, calipers, verniers, micrometers, telescopic 
gauges, dial indicators, trammel and frame gauges. 



Reg. 19 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



69 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Fastening Devices 



General Shop 
Equipment 



Types of bolts, nuts, studs, screws and tube fittings. 
Thread identification and classification. Tensile 
strengths. Installation procedures. Tightening 
torques. Cutting internal and external threads. 
Removing broken studs. "Heli-Coil" inserts. Types 
of rivets, keys, springs, flat and lock washers, snap 
rings, circlips, cotter pins. Installation and removal. 
Thread lubricants, sealers and locking compounds. 

Capacities and correct usage of floor cranes, hoists, 
jacks, stands, hydraulic presses, pullers. Operation 
and maintenance of degreasing and steamcleaning 
equipment. Operation and maintenance of air 
compressors. Capacities and use of tow trucks and 
related vehicle recovery equipment. 



Suspension 

Systems 



Front End Geometry 



Front Suspension 
(Solid Axle) 



Leaf Springs 



Front and Rear 

Independent 

Suspension 



Front and Rear 
Suspension Systems 
(Commercial Vehicles) 



Wheels and Rims 



Purpose and definition of caster, camber, toe-in, 
toe-out, ball joint or kingpin inclination, and turning 
angles. 

Purpose and application of solid axles. 

Elliot and Reverse Elhot. 

Servicing and straightening procedures. 

Characteristics of leaf springs, mountings and related 
parts — single leaf, multi-leaf, and helper springs. 
Inspection for wear, damage and distortion. Remov- 
ing, overhauling and reinstalling axles, springs and 
related parts. Lubrication. 

Characteristics of front and rear independent sus- 
pensions — coil and leaf spring, torsion bar and air- 
hydraulic. 

Inspecting suspension components. Effects of wear 
and misalignment. Checking suspension mountings. 
Tramming dimensions. Shock absorbers, stabilizers 
and radius rods. Overhaul of suspensions and related 
parts. Removing compressed springs. Replacing 
bushings. Maintaining preloading. Removing and 
nyistalling torsion bars. Torquing suspension com- 
ponents. Lubrication. Sealed systems. 

Purpose and characteristics of commercial vehicle 
suspensions: leaf springs, coil springs, torsion bars, 
rubber and air cushion types. Purpose of hangers 
and suspension control rods. Overhauling of sus- 
pensions and related components. Reahgnment. 
Lubrication. Effects of heat on suspension com- 
ponents. 

Characteristics of wheels and rims. Drop centre, 
removable flange and removable rim type wheels. 
Single and dual wheels. Removing and reinstalhng 
wheels and rims. Handling equipment. Wheel to 
hub fastening and locating devices. Inspecting, 
repairing and servicing wheels and rims. Run-out. 



70 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 19 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Tires and Tubes 

Wheel and Tire 
Balancing 


Types, sizes, characteristics and apphcation of tires 
and tubes. Demounting and mounting. Equipment 
and lubricants. Repair of tires, tubes and valves. 
Tire gauges and pressures. Safety precautions- 
tire inflation. Tire wear and irregularities. Use of 
tread depth gauge. Effects of misahgnment. In- 
spection of tires and tubes for damage, and faults. 
Tire rotation. Retreads. 

Effects of imbalance. Static and dynamic. Balancing 
equipment. Balancing wheels and related parts. 
Wheel weights. Installation. 


7 


Brake Systems 


Service Brakes 
Parking Brakes 


Brake actuating devices. Manual and power assisted. 
Brake operating systems. Hydrauhc, vacuum- 
hydrauHc, air-hydrauhc, air, etc. 
Operation of system components. Inspection pro- 
cedures. Disassembling and assembhng of system 
components. Cleaning procedures. Relining brake 
shoes. Reconditioning brake drums and brake discs. 
Reconditioning wheel cyhnders and master cylinders. 
Lubricating and adjusting wheel bearings. Replacing 
oil seals. Flushing or bleeding system. Flushing 
agents. Approved fluids. Servicing and adjustment 
of brakes. Clearances. Control valve adjustments 
and settings. Servicing tools and equipment. Road 
testing. 

Brake actuating systems and components. Dis- 
assembly, inspection, overhaul and reinstallation. 
Adjusting and testing. 


8 


Frames 


Standard Type 
Frames 

Unitized Construction 


Construction, materials and characteristics of frames; 
X-frame, ladder type, perimeter type. Effects of 
frame damage; diamond, sag, twist, sway and kick- 
up. Inspection methods. Measuring tools and equip- 
ment. Frame straightening and alignment equip- 
ment. Frame reahgnment methods and hook-ups. 
Crossmember replacement. Rivetting, welding and 
bolting frame members. Heat straightening. Pre- 
venting damage to components. 

Types and characteristics of unitized frames and 
suspension mountings. Unitized frame damage. 
Inspection methods. 

Measuring tools and equipment. Straightening and 
alignment equipment. Replacement and realign- 
ment of underbody sections. Heat straightening. 
Preventing damage to components. Sealing, paint- 
ing and insulating. Simultaneous front end align- 
ment check, for proofing. 


9 


Steering 
Systems 


Manual Types 


Characteristics of cam and lever, worm and roller, 
worm and sector, rack and pinion and recirculating 
ball steering gears. Gear shift controls and attached 



Reg. 19 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



71 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Power Types 

Steering Linkage and 
Alignment 


mechanisms. Lubricants. Oil sealing. Removal, 
overhaul and reinstallation of steering columns and 
box assemblies. Adjusting steering gear boxes, gear 
shift (ontrols and attached mechanisms. 

Characteristics of integral and linkage types of power 
steering systems. Special tools, gauges and equip- 
ment. Oil seals and vents. Filling and bleeding systems. 
Fluids. Adjusting pump drives and belts. Testing 
pressures and valve operation. Adjustment and cen- 
tering of control valves. Centering steering on high 
point. Overhauling power steering systems. Cleaning 
methods. Removing, overhaul and reinstallation of 
steering assembly. Alignment and adjustment of 
steering gear boxes, columns and attached mech- 
anisms. 

Characteristics of steering linkages, bushings and 
joints. Wheel alignment ; types and use of tools, 
gauges and equipment to measure caster, camber, 
balljoint or kingpin incHnation, turning angles and 
toe-in. 

Correcting alignment angles. Adjustment, shimming 
or bending. Angle correction sequence. Inspecting 
and overhauhng steering linkage and joints. Secur- 
ing and locking steering components. Lubrication. 
Sealed systems. Road testing. 



Part 2 
Work Experience Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


• Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


General Shop 
Practice 


General 


Safety rules and removal of all safety hazards. 
Use of hand and power tools, measuring instruments, 
fastening devices and general shop equipment. 
(As detailed in Part 1.) 


2 


Suspension 

Systems 


Front Suspension 
(Solid Axle) 

Leaf Springs 


Axle removal, overhaul and reinstallation. Straight- 
ening operations; Correction of caster, camber and 
king-pin incHnation. Lubrication. 

Single leaf, multi-leaf and helper springs; mountings 
and related components. Inspecting, removing, over- 
hauling and reinstalling. Lubrication. 



72 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 19 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Front and Rear 

Independent 

Suspensions 

Front and Rear 
Suspension Systems 
(Commercial Vehicles) 

Wheels and Rims 

Tires, Tubes and 
Valves 

Wheel and Tire 
Balancing 


Coil and leaf spring, torsion bar and air-hydraulic 
systems. Suspension mountings. Tramming dimen- 
sions. Overhaul of suspensions and related com- 
ponents; shock absorbers, stabilizers and radius rods. 
Removing compressed springs and related parts. 
Replacing bushings; maintaining preloading. Tor- 
sion bar replacement. Torquing suspension com- 
ponents. Assembly realignment. Lubrication ; sealed 
systems. 

Leaf and coil spring, torsion bar, rubber and air 
cushion types. Overhaul of suspensions and related 
components, hangers and suspension control rods. 
Assembly realignment. Lubrication. 

Removal, repair, servicing and reinstallation. Hand- 
ling equipment. Checking run-out. 

Demounting, inspection, repair and mounting. Equip- 
ment and lubricants. Tire inflation precautions. Re- 
cognition of tire wear, faults and misalignment. Tire 

rotation. 

Use of on and off-vehicle balancing equipment. In- 
stallation of weights. 


3 


Brake Systems 


Service Brakes 
Parking Brakes 


Manual and power assisted; hydraulic, vacuum- 
hydrauhc, air-hydraulic, air operated. Disassembly, 
inspection, overhaul or reconditioning and reinstal- 
lation. 

Cleaning operations. Relining brake shoes. Recon- 
ditioning brake drums and discs, wheel cylinders and 
master cylinders. Lubricating and adjusting wheel 
bearings. Replacing oil seals. Flushing and bleeding 
systems. Flushing agents. Approved fluids. Servicing 
and adjustment. Control valve adjustments and 
settings. Road testing. 

Brake actuating systems and components. Inspec- 
tion, overhaul or reconditioning. Adjusting and 
testing. 


4 


Frames 


Standard Type 

Unitized 
Construction 


Determination of frame damage. Inspection. Frame 
straightening and alignment. Rivetting, welding and 
bolting frame members. Crossmember replacement. 
Heat straightening. 

Damage inspection. Straightening and alignment. 
Replacement and realignment of underbody sections 
and suspension mountings. Front end alignment 
proofing check. Heat straightening. Sealing, painting 
and insulating. 



Reg. 19 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



73 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


5 


Steering Systems 


Manual Types 
Power Types 

Steering Linkage and 

Alignment 


Cam and lever, worm and roller, worm and sector, 
rack and pinion recirculating ball types. Gear shift 
controls and attached mechanisms. Removal, over- 
haul and reinstallation of steering box and column 
assemblies. Lubrication. Alignment and adjust- 
ment. Road testing. 

Integral and hnkage types. Filling and bleeding 
systems. Approved fluids. Adjusting pump drives 
and belts. Special tools, gauges and equipment. 
Testing pressures and valve operation. Adjustment 
and centering of control valves. Centering steering 
on high point. Removal, overhaul and reinstallation 
of power steering systems. Alignment and adjust- 
ment. Road testing. 

Use of tools, gauges and equipment to measure caster, 
camber, ball joint or king-pin inclination, turning 
angles and toe-in. Correction of alignment angles by 
adjustment, shimming or bending. Correction 
sequence. Inspection and overhaul of steering hnkage 
and joints. Securing and locking steering components. 
Sealing and lubrication ; sealed systems. Road testing. 



O. Reg. 100/69. Sched. 



74 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 20 



REGULATION 20 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



AUTO BODY REPAIRER 
I. In this Regulation, 

(a) "auto body repairer" means a person en- 
gaged in the repair of motor vehicles who, 

(i) hammers out dents in body panels, 
fenders and skirting, 

(ii) files, grinds, sands, fills and finishes 
ready for priming, any dented, 
welded or pieced area, 

(iii) by heat treatment, shrinks or 
stretches metal panels, 

(iv) welds breaks in body areas, 

(v) tests for and corrects faulty align- 
ment of frames, 

(vi) paints and glazes, and 

(vii) removes and installs body parts ; 

(b) "certified trade" means the trade of auto 
body repairer ; 

(c) "motor vehicle" means a vehicle propelled 
by an internal combustion engine, or a 
vehicle operated or controlled from a vehicle 
propelled by an internal combustion engine, 
that is registered for use on a highway under 
The Highway Traffic Act and is used 
primarily for the transport of persons, 
equipment or goods but does not include a 
vehicle, 

(i) operated only on rails, 

(ii) used for transportation solely within 
an employer's actual place of busi- 
ness, or 

(iii) used for farming operations but not 
used for carrying a load. O. Reg. 
99/69, s.l. 



2. The trade of auto body repairer is designated 
as a certified trade for the purposes of the Act. 
O. Reg. 99/69, s. 2. 



3. An apprentice training program for the certi- 
fied trade is established and shall consist of, 



(a) training and instruction at full-time educa- 
tional day classes provided at a College of 
Apphed Arts and Technology or in classes 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto ; and 

{b) practical training and instruction provided 
by an employer of the apprentice, 

in the subjects contained in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 99/69, s. 3. 

4. — ( 1 ) Sub] ect to subsection 2 , an apprentice shall 
complete four periods of training and instruction of 
1800 hours per period. 

(2) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma 
majoring in auto body repair or has such other 
qualification that, in the opinion of the Director, is 
equivalent thereto, he shall complete four periods of 
training and instruction of 1400 hours per period. 
O. Reg. 99/69, s. 4. 

5. A person holding a certificate of qualification in 
the trade of automotive painter may qualify for 
examination for a certificate of qualification in the 
trade of auto body repairer by becoming indentured 
as an auto body repairer apprentice and completing 
the final three periods of training and instruction of 
1800 hours per period in the subjects contained in 
Parts 1 and 2 of the Schedule. O. Reg. 99/69, s. 5. 

6. No person shall become an apprentice in the 
certified trade unless he has successfully completed 
Grade 8 in Ontario or has such other academic 
qualification that, in the opinion of the Director, is 
equivalent thereto. O. Reg. 99/69, s. 6. 



7. Any person who, 

(a) applies in the prescribed form for apprentice- 
ship in the trade ; and 

(6) becomes an apprentice in the certified 
trade within three months after commenc- 
ing to work in that trade, 

is exempt from subsection 2 of section 10 of the Act. 
O. Reg. 99/69, s. 7. 

8. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the 
certified trade whether for his regular daily hours or 
for hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall not 
be less than, 



Reg. 20 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



75 



(a) 50 per cent during the first period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 

{b) 60 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; 

{c) 80 per cent during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction ; and 

{d) 90 per cent during the fourth period of 
training and instruction, 



of the average rate of wages for journeymen employed 
by the employer in that trade or, where the 
employer is the only journeyman employed, of the 
average rate of wages for journeymen in the area. 
O. Reg. 99/69, s. 8. 

9. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
are the subjects set out in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 99/69, s. 9. 



Schedule 

AUTO BODY REPAIRER 

Part 1 
In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Mathematics 


Arithmetic 
Geometry 


Addition, subtraction and division of whole numbers 
and fractions, ratio and proportion, areas and 
volumes. 

Lines, planes and angles. 


2 


Science 


Physics 
Mechanics 


Basic laws and principles, formulae. 
(Given as required in shop instruction.) 


3 


English 


Basic Usage and 

Business 

Communications 


Trade terminology and usage. Letter and report 
writing. Work and parts orders. Interpretation and 
use of manufacturers' manuals. 


4 


General Shop 
Practice 


Safety 
Hand Tools 
Power Tools 


Safety rules and safe operating procedures. First 
aid. Fire prevention. Use and maintenance of fire- 
fighting equipment. 

Handling of gasoHne, oils, paints, thinners and sol- 
vents. Dangers of spontaneous combustion. Danger 
of carbon monoxide fumes. Correct use of lifting and 
hoisting equipment. Good housekeeping. 

Selection and use of screwdrivers, hammers, dolHes, 
spoons, calking irons, picks, wrenches, sockets, pliers, 
vise-grips, clamps, files, chisels, snips, drifts, panel 
cutters, punches, hacksaws, drill bits, reamers, taps 
and dies, stud extractors. Door and regulator handle 
removal tools, putty knives, scrapers, blowgun, paint 
brushes and striping tools. 

Care and use of air and electric drills, impact tools, 
nibblers, disc and orbital sanders, polishers. 



76 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 20 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Benchwork 
Operations 

Measuring 
Instruments 

Fastening Devices 

General Shop 
Equipment (Paint- 
Shop Equipment 
under "Refinishing") 


Cutting with hacksaw, filing, drilhng; use of drill 
press and bench grinder; grinding of drill bits, 
chisels, etc. Soldering. Oxy-acetylene and arc 
welding and cutting. Brazing. Spot welding. Care 
and maintenance of welding equipment. 

Use of rules, straight-edges and squares. Frame, 
trammel and track gauges. 

Types of bolts, nuts, studs, screws, speed nuts, trim 
chps, T-bolts, and tube fittings. Thread identifica- 
tion and classification, tensile strengths. Instal- 
lation procedures. Cutting internal and external 
threads. Removing broken studs. Types of rivets, 
keys, springs, fiat and lock washers, snap rings, 
circhps, cotter pins. Installation and removal. 
Thread lubricants and sealers. 

Capacities and correct usage of floor cranes, hoists, 
jacks, stands and hydraulic presses. Care and use of 
hydrauhc and air-hydraulic body jacking equip- 
ment, frame straightening and alignment racks. 
Bending brakes and rolls. Holding units or fixtures 
for doors, hoods and truck lids. Power hacksaws. 
Operation and maintenance of degreasing and steam 
cleaning equipment. 


5 


Body Repair 


Metal Forming (Steel) 
Normahzing (Steel) 

Shrinking (Steel) 

Metal Working 
(Aluminum) 

Filling Preparation 
Body-Solder Filling 


Panel forming. Flanging and forming contours with 
hand tools. Forming rocker panels, headhght repair 
caps, door panels and rear quarter repair panels. 

Metal Bumping. Dressing high and low contour 
panels. Unlocking metal. Direct hammering. In- 
direct hammering. Spring hammering. Picking and 
filing. Line filing. X-filing. Cross-filing. Metal 
finishing. Correct use of disc sander. 

Heat temperature. Shrinking with hammer and 
dolly. Shrinking without dolly. Quenching. 

Roughing out panels ; use of mallet or rubber hammer. 
Dressing damage. Shrinking. Anneahng. Finishing. 

Dressing damaged areas. Welding. "Sinking" weld. 
Surface preparation. 

Fluxes. Composition of solders. Grading. Types. 
Temperatures — Solidus and Pasty Ranges. Tinning 
methods (Steel). Tinning methods (Aluminum); 
Flux and non-flux methods. Solder Paddling. Types 
of wood paddles; care and lubrication. Vertical, 
horizontal and overhead application. Heat control. 
Finishing of solder-filled areas. 



Reg. 20 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



77 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 












Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






"Cold Filling" 
(Steel and Aluminum) 
and Fibreglas 
Body Repair 


Use of epoxy resins, fibreglas and polyester fillers. 
Hardeners. Heat application. Gelcoats. Pot life. 
Preparation of damaged areas, mixing, application, 
"lay-up" and finishing methods. 






Door, Hood and 
Truck Lid Damage 


Holding units and fixtures. Damage correction 
sequence. Aligning and straightening procedures. 
Use of hydraulic body jacking equipment. 






Major Body Shell 
Damage 


Damage correction sequence. Use of hydraulic body 
jacking equipment to correct body alignment. 
Measuring checking procedures. Diagonal measure- 
ments. Door, windshield and rear windshield fit 
checks. Simultaneous body and frame straightening 
in cases of major damage and unitized construction. 
Rough-out and repair of inner construction prior to 
removal or repair of damaged outer panels. 


6 


Panel 
Replacement 


Hoods 


Alignment of hood to vent panel, fenders and hood 
lock. Adjust in hinges. Shimming. Application of 
sound deadening materials. 






Front Fenders 


Alignment of front fender to door panel and hood; 
Adjustment. Replacement of front fender inner 
panel. Radiator Cradle support — Replacement 
methods. Adjustment, Shimming. Grille replace- 
ment ; Hood latch adjustment. 






Bumpers 


Replacement of arms. Adjustment and alignment. 
Use of heat. Replacement of face bars. 






Door Panels 


Removal of trim, weather stripping, hardware and 
old panel. Installation and fitting of new panel. 
Fitting and adjusting doors. Tack welding. Metal 
finishing. Application of sound deadening materials. 
Replacement of trim, hardware, and weather 
stripping. 






Rear Quarter Panels 


Alignment of panel to trunk lid, door and inner panel. 

Installation methods. Quarter inner panel (wheel 
housing) replacement methods. Rocker panel re- 
placement methods. 






Trunk Lids 


Adjustment and fitting. Torsion bar adjustment. 
Shimming. Heating hinges. AppHcation of weather 
stripping. Trunk latch adjustment. 






Roof Panels 


Removal of roof area garnish mouldings, rear and 
front windshields, headliner and insulation. Drilling 
and cutting of welds. Roof panel removal. Position- 
ing of new panel, aligning to fit doors, body panels, 
and glass. Welding in position. Reinstallation of 
roof insulation, headUner, windshields and garnish 
mouldings. 



78 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 20 



Item 


Column 1 


1 

Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


7 


Glass 
Replacement 


Windshields 

Door, Vent and Rear 
Quarter Glass 


Bonded and Rubber insert type: Removal and re- 
installation. SeaHng windshield. Types of inserts. 
Moulding installation. Fasteners. 

Removal and replacement of trim, hardware, glass 
and accessories. Adjustment of channels, regulators 
and power assisted mechanisms. 


8 


Trim 
Replacement 


Headliners 

Interior Trim 

Seat Frame and 
Track Repair 


Removal and reinstallation of headhners. Shrinking 
and care of headhner. Repair procedures. 

Removal and reinstallation of interior trim. Sham- 
pooing. Recovering panels. Upholstery repairs. 

Seat and upholstery removal. Repair methods. 
Upholstery replacement and reinstallation of seat. 
Seat track types and maintenance. 


9 


Hardware 
Replacement 


Hardware 


Door locks and handles, trunk latches; removal and 
replacement. Lubrication. Minor repairs. Striker 
plates; Removal and replacement, Adjustment, 
Diagnosing adjusting faults. Door hinges — Recon- 
ditioning or replacement. Freeing seized hinges. 
Ad j ustment . Door checks— removal and installation . 
Adjustment and lubrication. 

Moulding and Ornaments: removal and reinstalla- 
tion. SeaUng. 


'lO 


Lights 


Light Assembly 
Replacement 


Removal and reinstallation of light assembhes and 
headlight buckets. Sealing. Replacement of seal 
beam units; Use of headhght aiming equipment. 
Electrical wiring; Soldering. Resin flux. Solderless 
connections. Tests for correct hght operation. 
Grounding. 


11 


Cooling System 


Radiator Repairs 


Types of radiators. Cleaning acids and fluxes. 
Solders and soldering methods. Cleaning cores and 
Testing. Automatic transmission oil coolers. Pres- 
sure cap specifications. Recoring procedures. Test- 
ing, painting and reinstallation. Automatic trans- 
mission fluid level checks. Antifreeze solutions. 
Testing. Radiator hoses and clamps. Sealers, 
Replacement. Thermostats; Function, Removal, 
testing and replacement. 


12 


Front End 
Alignment 


Principles 
Wheels and Tires 


Steering geometry. Definition of caster, camber, 
king-pin and ball-joint incUnation and toe-in. Prin- 
ciples of front-end alignment machine operation. 
Wheel straightening. Tire demounting and mount- 
ing. Wheel balancing. Static. Dynamic. 


13 


Frames 


Standard Frame 
Damage 


Construction and characteristics of frames: X-frame, 
ladder type, perimeter type. Effects of damaged 
frames. Diamond, sag, twist, sway and kick-up. 
Inspection methods. Measuring tools and equip- 
ment. Frame straightening and alignment methods 



Reg. 20 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



79 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 




' 


Unitized 
Construction Damage 


and equipment. Rivetting, welding and bolting 
frame members. Crossmember replacement. Heat 
straightening. 

Types and characteristics of unitized frames and 
suspension mountings. Damage inspection. Straight- 
ening and ahgnment methods and equipment. Re- 
placement and realignment of underbody sections. 
Simultaneous front end alignment proofing check. 
Heat straightening. Seahng, painting and insulating. 


14 


Estimating 


Body Repair 

Estimating 

Procedures 


Preparing estimates. Hidden damage. Average 
operation times. Labour, material and overhead 
costs. Typical estimates on collision repair jobs. 
Use of flat rate manual. 


15 


Body Shop 
Management 


Quahty Control 

Discipline and 
Public Relations 


Quality of workmanship. Acceptable standards. 
Legal implications of safe quality workmanship. 

Employees' attitude towards employer, insurance 
adjuster, customers and fellow workers. 



AUTOMOTIVE REFINISHING 



16 


Spray Painting 
Equipment 


Paint Spray Guns 

Transformers 
(Regulators and 
Condensers) 

Air Compressors 

Respirators and 
Masks 

Spray Booths 
Drying Equipment 


Types, principles of operation, component parts, 
gun conditions and remedies. Material container 
types. Spray gun maintenance. Types, construc- 
tion, and use of air and fluid hoses, connections, 
couplings and adaptors. Pressure drop. 

Types and purpose. Installation. Minimum pipe 
sizes. Pressure drop. Moisture and oil problems. 
Maintenance procedures. 

Types and purpose, single and 2-stage: components, 
C.F.M. capacities. Installation and basic main- 
tenance. 

Organic vapor and dust types. Correct usage and 
servicing. 

Types, purpose and operation. Dry and wash types. 
Special spray booth features. Lights, filters, fans. 
Maintenance procedures. 

Convection (Direct heat) and radiation (Infra-Red) 
drying and baking ovens. Operation and mainte- 
nance. Portable drying equipment. 


17 


Spraying 
Techniques 


Critical Factors 


Importance of correct gun type, fluid tip and air cap 
combination, fluid and spreader adjustment and 
atomizing air pressure. Spray patterns. Gun posi- 
tion; distance, stroking, triggering, speed and over- 
lap. Practice spraying of various shaped panels in 
horizontal and vertical positions. 



80 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 20 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


18 


Surface 

Preparation 

MateHals 


Types, Purpose, 
Description and 
Correct Usage 


Paint finish cleaning solvents. Metal conditioners. 
Waterproof and dry type sandpapers, portable 
Sander discs; grain, backing and bonding. Paint 
removers. Hot and cold stripping. Sand blasting, 
power and manual sanding. Masking materials — 
tapes, paper, compounds. Masking machines, "Tack- 
rags". 


19 


Surface 
Preparation 


Preparation 
Procedures 


Determination of surface condition. Surface analy- 
sis. Adhesion testing. Preparation of surfaces in 
good and poor condition and "green" or freshly 
painted surfaces. Masking and sanding techniques. 
"Featheredging". Paper grade. Wet or dry, hand 
or power sanding. 

Blowing and "Tacking". Metal conditioning. Wax, 
siHcone and metal conditioner removal. 


20 


Refinishing 
Materials and 
Methods 


Purpose, Description 
Characteristics and 
AppHcation Methods 

Paint Finish 
Conditions 

Spot Repair 
and Touch-up 

Clean-Up Operations 


Primers, primer - surfacers, putty, sealers, solid 
colours and metaUics. Colour material formulation; 
acryhc enamels and lacquers, alkyd (PX) and nitro- 
cellulose lacquers. Drying characteristics. Effects 
of temperature and humidity. 

Thinners or reducers. Formulation; accelerators 
and retarders. Mixing and reduction. Viscosity 
checks. Straining. 

Tests for paint type (old finish). Paint compatibility- 
intermixing, etc. Factors affecting refinish colour 
match. Colour codes. Use of silicone additives. 
Force drying and baking ; baking converters. 
Rubbing and polishing compounds. Hand and 
machine application. 

Identification of paint conditions. Causes and cor- 
rective action. Colour coat mil thickness require- 
ments and measurement. 

Use of enamels, acrylics and lacquers for spot repairs 
and touch-up. Blending to reduce or ehminate 
contrast. 

Removal of overspray from glass, chrome and paint. 
Effects of solvents on plastic trim. Tire dressings. 


21 


Paint Finish 
Deterioration 


Causes of 
Deterioration 


Identification of adverse effects of elements and 
materials on paint finish. 


22 


Paint Finish Care 


Purpose and Use of 
Polishes and Cleaners 


Wax and silicone — wax types. Effects of cleaners and 
polishes on acrylics, lacquers and enamels. 
Polishing requirements and precautions for newly 
refinished vehicles. Paint finish maintenance. 


23 


Specialty 
Refinishing 


Materials and 
Procedures 


Refinishing of galvanized outer panels and anodized 
aluminum moulding insert areas. 
Multi-colour spatter finishes (trunk interiors, floors, 
etc.) Simulated vinyl hard top finishes. Striping; 
use of masking tape; lining brush and wheel machine. 
Application of decals and transfers. "Two-toning". 



Reg. 20 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



81 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


24 


Estimating and 

Shop 

Management 


Estimating and 
Factors to be 
Considered 

Quality Control 


Estimating procedures; condition of previous paint 
job. Average operation times. Labour, material, 
overhead costs. Use of flat rate manual. Typical 
estimates and costing of complete or partial paint 
jobs. 

Quality of workmanship. Acceptable standards. 



Part 2 
Work Experience Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


General Shop 
Practice 


General 


Safety rules and removal of all safety hazards. 
Use of hand and power tools, measuring instruments, 
fastening devices and general shop equipment. 
Bench work operations. (As detailed in Part 1.) 


2 


Body Repair 


Panel Forming 
Panel Repair (Steel) 

(Aluminum) 

Body-Solder FilUng 

"Cold filling" 
(Steel and Aluminum) 
and Fibreglas Body 
Repair 

Door, Hood and 
Truck Lid Damage 

Major Body Shell 
Damage 


Forming repair panels with hand tools. 

Roughing out and dressing damaged areas. Skrink- 

ing. Picking and fihng. Metal finishing. 

Roughing out and dressing damaged areas. Shrink- 
ing. AnneaUng. Finishing. 

Filling preparation. Dressing. Welding. Surface 
preparation. Tinning steel and aluminum panels. 
Solder Paddling. Finishing filled areas. 

Use of epoxy resins, fibreglas and polyester fillers. 
Preparation of damaged areas, mixing, apphcation, 
"lay-up" and finishing. 

Determination of damage correction sequence. 
Aligning and straightening. Use of hydrauhc body 
jacking equipment and holding units and fixtures for 
off vehicle repairs. 

Determination of damage correction sequence. Use 
of hydrauhc body jacking equipment to correct body 
alignment. Measurement checking. Door, wind- 
shield and rear windshield fit checks. Simultaneous 
body and frame straightening (major damage and 
unitized construction). 



82 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 20 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


3 


Panel 
Replacement 


Hoods 

Front Fenders 

Bumpers 
Door Panels 

Rear Quarter Panels 
Trunk Lids 
Roof Panels 


Installation and alignment of hood and hood lock. 
Hinge adjustment. 

Installation and alignment; adjustment. Replace- 
ment of front fender inner panel. Replacement of 
radiator cradle supports. Grille replacement; hood 
latch adjustment. 

Replacement of arms. Adjustment and alignment. 
Replacement of face bars. 

Removal of trim, weather stripping, hardware and 
damaged panel. Installation of new panel. Fitting 
and adjusting doors. Tack welding. Metal finishing. 
Apphcation of sound deadening materials. Replace- 
ment of trim, hardware, and weather stripping. 

Removal of damaged panel. Alignment of new panel 
and installation. Quarter inner panel (wheel hous- 
ing) replacement. Rocker panel replacement. 

Adjustment and fitting. Torsion bar adjustment. 
Apphcation of weather stripping. Latch adjust- 
ment. 

Removal of roof area garnish mouldings, windshields, 
headhner and insulation. Drilhng and cutting of 
welds and roof panel removal. Aligning new panel 
to fit doors, body panels, and glass. Welding. Re- 
installation of insulation, headhner, windshields and 
garnish mouldings. 


4 


Glass 
Replacement 


Windshields 

Door, Vent and Rear 
Quarter Glass 


Removal and reinstallation of bonded and rubber 
insert types. Seahng. 

Removal and replacement of trim, hardware, glass 
and accessories. Adjustment of channels, regulators 
and power assisted mechanisms. 


5 


Trim 
Replacement 


Headliners and 
Interior Trim 

Seat Frame and 
Track Repair 


Removal and reinstallation. Headhner shrinking 
and care. Shampooing. Recovering trim panels. 
Headhner and upholstery repairs. 
Seat and upholstery removal. Repairs to frame. 
Upholstery replacement and reinstallation of seat. 
Seat track maintenance. 


6 


Hardware 
Replacement 


Hardware 


Door locks and handles, trunk latches; removal and 
replacement. Lubrication. Minor repairs. Striker 
plates; Removal and replacement, adjustment, diag- 
nosing adjusting faults. Door hinges: Recondition- 
ing or replacement. Freeing seized hinges. Adjust- 
ment. Door checks: removal and installation. Ad- 
justment and lubrication. Mouldings and Orna- 
ments: removal and reinstallation. Sealing. 



Reg. 20 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



83 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


7 


Lights 


Light Assembly 
Replacement 


Removal and reinstallation of hght assembUes and 
headhght buckets. SeaUng. Replacement of seal 
beam units; Headlight aiming. Electrical wiring; 
soldering, solderless connections, insulating. Testing 
for correct light operation. 


8 


Cooling System 


Radiator Repairs 


Solder repairs to tanks and cores. Cleaning cores and 
testing. Testing automatic transmission oil coolers. 
Famiharization with pressure cap specifications. 
Recoring; testing, painting and reinstallation. 
Automatic transmission fluid level checks. Testing 
antifreeze solutions. Replacement of radiator hoses 
and clamps. Thermostats; removal, testing and 
replacement. 


9 


Wheels and Tires 


Servicing 


Wheel straightening. Tire demounting and mount- 
ing. Wheel Balancing. 


10 


Frames 


Standard Frame 
Damage 

Unitized 
Construction Damage 


Determination of frame damage. Inspection. Frame 
straightening and ahgnment. Rivetting, welding 
and bolting frame members. Crossmember replace- 
ment. Heat straightening. 

Damage inspection. Straightening and alignment. 
Replacement and realignment of underbody sec- 
tions. Need for front end alignment proofing check. 
Heat straightening. Sealing, painting and insulating. 


'' 


Estimating 


Body Repair 
Estimating 


Preparing estimates. Costing collision repair jobs. 
Use of flat rate manual. 


12 


Body Shop 
Management 


Quality Control 

Discipline and PubUc 
Relations 


Acceptable standards of workmanship. Legal im- 
plications of safe quality workmanship. 

Attitude towards employer, insurance adjuster, 
customers and fellow workers. 



AUTOMOTIVE REFINISHING 



13 


Spray Painting 
Equipment 


Use, Operation and 
Maintenance 


Familiarization with use, operation and maintenance 
of spray guns, air and fluid hoses and fittings, trans- 
formers, air compressors, spray booths, respirators 
and masks. Drying and baking ovens and portable 
drying equipment. 


14 


Surface 
Preparation 


Surface Condition 

Preparation 
Procedures 


Analysis of surface condition. Identification of 
adverse effects of elements and materials on paint 
finish. Testing for adhesion, paint types, finish age 
and silicones. 

Removal of mouldings, trim, hardware and emblems 
as required. 



84 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 20 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Item 










Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 








Selection and use of paint finish cleaning solvents, 
paint removers if required and baking equipment for 
"Green" or freshly painted vehicles. 








Blowing and masking. Spot sanding and feather- 
edging of damaged or repaired areas, or complete 
overall sanding as required. Selection and use of 
dry or waterproof sandpapers by hand or power 
sanding. 








Selection and use of metal conditioners. 








Spot or overall application of primers and primer 
surfacers as required. 








Final complete overall sanding and primer touch-up 
of bare metal. 


15 


Refinishing 
Operations 


Colour Match 


Refinish colour matching and tinting. Use of colour 
codes. 






Mixing and Reduction 


Selection of thinners or reducers. Mixing and reduc- 
tion of sealers, acrylic enamels and lacquers, alkyd 
(PX) and nitro-cellulose lacquers; solid colours and 
metalhcs. 






Additives and 
Viscosities 


Use of accelerators and retarders, silicone additives 
and baking converters. Checking viscosities. Strain- 
ing. 






Testing and Checking 
Procedures 


Testing gun operation and spray pattern. Adjusting 
atomizing and fluid pressures. Checking spray booth 
light and exhaust fan operation. Rechecking mask- 
ing and installing wheel covers. Blowing-down and 
"tacking". 






Application of Sealer 
and Finish Coats 


Spray application of sealers and finish materials in 
accordance with manufacturer's recommendations. 






Paint Finish 
Conditions 


Familiarization with causes of paint conditions, and 
corrective action. 






Spot Repair and 
Touch-up 


Blending of finishing coats into adjacent areas to 
reduce or eliminate contrast. 






Drying or Baking 


Air dry, force dry or baking of finish coats according 
to type of material applied. 
Removal of masking materials. 






Polishing Lacquers 


Hand or power application of rubbing compounds or 
polishes. 






Clean-up 


Removing overspray from glass, chrome, paint and 
trim. Applying tire dressings. Replacing moulding, 
etc. 



Reg. 20 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



85 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


16 


Paint Finish 
Care 


Use of Polishes and 
Cleaners 


Famiharization with polishing requirements and pre- 
cautions for newly refinished vehicles and effects of 
cleaners and pohshes on acryhcs, lacquers and 
enamels. 


17 


Specialty 
Refinishing 


Materials and 
Procedures 


Refinishing of galvanized outer panels and anodized 
aluminum moulding insert areas. AppUcation of 
multicolour spatter finishes (trunk interiors, floors, 
etc.), simulated vinyl hard top finishes. Striping. 
Application of decals and transfers. "Two-toning". 


18 


Estimating and 

Shop 

Management 


Estimating 
Procedures 


Preparation of estimates. Costing of complete or 
partial paint jobs. Use of flat rate manual. Accept- 
able standards of workmanship. 

O.Reg.99/69,Sched. 



86 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 21 



REGULATION 21 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



AUTOMOTIVE MACHINIST 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "automotive machinist" means a person 
who, 

(i) reconditions and rebuilds internal 
combustion engines and associate 
components, power trains, brake 
system components and suspension 
system components, 

(ii) disassembles, cleans, inspects, recon- 
ditions and adjusts crankshafts, 
camshafts, drive shafts, cylinder 
heads, cylinder blocks, manifolds 
and flywheels, 

(iii) balances rotating parts, fits pins, 
grinds and turns brake drums and 
brake discs and faces brake shoes, 

(iv) bores and sleeves cyhnder blocks, 
rebores and finishes engine cylinders, 

(v) reconditions connecting rods, ser- 
vices valve trains, resizes pistons 
and aligns borings, 

(vi) welds crankshafts and cams, braces 
saddle bores and metallizes engine 
parts, 

(vii) tests cyhnder blocks, manifolds, 
cyhnder heads and engines, and 

(viii) rebuilds engine components and 
parts ; 

(6) "certified trade" means the trade of auto- 
motive machinist ; 

(c) "motor vehicle" means a vehicle propelled 
by an internal combustion engine, or a 
vehicle operated or controlled from a 
vehicle propelled by an internal combustion 
engine, that is registered for use on a high- 
way under The Highway Traffic Act and is 
used primarily for the transport of persons, 
equipment or goods, but does not include 
a vehicle, 

(i) operated only on rails, 

(ii) used for transportation solely within 
an employer's actual place of busi- 
ness, or 



(iii) used for farming operations but not 
used for carrying a load. O. Reg. 
97/69. s.l. 

2. The trade of automotive machinist is desig- 
nated as a certified trade for the purposes of the Act. 
O. Reg. 97/69, s. 2. 

3. An apprentice training program for the certi- 
fied trade is established and shall consist of, 

(a) training and instruction at full-time edu- 
cational day classes provided at a College 
of Applied Arts and Technology or in classes 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto ; and 

[h) practical training and instruction provided 
by an employer of the apprentice, 

in the subjects contained in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 97/69, s. 3. 



4. — (1) Subject to subsections 2 and 3, an appren- 
tice shall complete four periods of training and 
instruction of 1800 hours per period. 

(2) Where the apprentice is the holder of an On- 
tario Grade 12 Secondary School Graduation Diploma 
majoring in auto mechanics or machine shop practice, 
or has such other qualification that, in the opinion of 
the Director, is equivalent thereto, he shall complete 
four periods of training and instruction of 1500 
hours per period. 

(3) Where the apprentice, 

{a) has successfully completed that part of the 
training program established for the cert- 
tified trade under clause a of section 3, 
consisting of training and instruction at 
full-time educational day classes provided 
at a College of Applied Arts and Technology 
or in classes that, in the opinion of the 
Director, are equivalent thereto, in the sub- 
jects contained in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule ; and 

(6) displays such aptitude and abihty that, in 
the opinion of his employer submitted in 
writing to the Director, the apprentice has 
attained the level of competence of a jour- 
neyman in the certified trade, 

the apprentice need only complete the first three 
periods of training and instruction of 1800 hours per 
period set out in subsection 1. O. Reg. 97/69, s. 4. 



Reg. 21 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



87 



5. A person holding a certificate of qualification 
in the certified trade of motor vehicle mechanic may 
qualify for examination for a certificate of qualifi- 
cation in the trade of automotive machinist, 

{a) by becoming indentured as an apprentice in 
the trade of automotive machinist and 
completing the final two periods of training 
and instruction of 1800 hours per period 
in the subjects contained in Parts 1 and 2 
of the Schedule ; or 

{b) by submitting written evidence, satis- 
factory to the Director, of having had at 
least two years experience as a journeyman 
in the, trade of automotive machinist. 
O. Reg. 97/69, s. 5. 

6. Sections 8 and 9 and subsections 2 and 4 of 
section 10 of the Act do not apply to any person who 
works or is employed in the certified trade. O. Reg. 
97/69, s. 6. 

7. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the 
certified trade whether for his regular daily hours or 
for hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall 
not be less than, 

(a) 60 per cent during the first period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 

(6) 70 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; 

(c) 80 per cent during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction ; and 



(d) 90 per cent during the fourth period of 
training and instruction, 

of the average rate of wages for journeymen em- 
ployed by the employer in that trade or, where the 
employer is the only journeyman employed, of the 
average rate of wages for journeymen in the area. 
O. Reg. 97/69, s. 7. 

8. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
are the subjects contained in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 97/69, s. 8. 

9. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the certified trade shall not 
exceed, 

{a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
certified trade, one apprentice plus an addi- 
tional apprentice for each additional two 
journeymen employed by the employer in 
the certified trade and with whom the 
apprentice is working ; or 

(b) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the certified trade, one apprentice for the 
first journeyman employed by the employer 
plus an additional apprentice for each addi- 
tional two journeymen employed by the 
employer in the certified trade and with 
whom the apprentice is working. O. Reg. 
97/69, s. 9. 

10. A certificate of qualification in the certified 
trade remains in force until cancelled or suspended 
in accordance with the regulations. O. Reg. 97/69, 
s. 10. 



Schedule 
AUTOMOTIVE MACHINIST 

Part 1 
In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Mathematics 


Arithmetic 
Geometry 


Addition, subtraction, division of whole numbers, 
fractions and decimals, ratio and proportion, areas 
and volumes. 

Lines, planes and angles. 


2 


Science 


Physics 


Basic laws and principles, formulae. (Given as 
required in shop instruction.) 



88 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 21 



Itei 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



English 



Usage and Business 
Communications 



Trade terminology and usage. Letter and report 
writing. Work and parts orders. Interpretation and 
use of manufacturers' manuals. 



Drafting 



Basic Drafting and 
Interpretation 



Preparation of elementary working drawmgs and 
dimensioned sketches of automotive components. 
Interpretation of exploded drawings, electrical and 
hydraulic circuits and schematics usea in manu- 
facturers' manuals. 



General Shop 
Practice 



Safety 



Hand Tools 



Power Tools 



Benchwork 



Measuring 
Instruments 



Fastening Devices 



Safety rules and safe operating procedures. First 
aid. Fire prevention. Use and maintenance of fire- 
fighting equipment. Handling of gasohne, oils and 
cleaning solvents. Danger of carbon monoxide 
fumes. Correct use of hfting and hoisting equip- 
ment. Good housekeeping. 

Selection and use of hammers, punches, chisels, pliers, 
wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers, hacksaws, files, 
drifts, scrapers, snips, clamps, drill bits, reamers, 
vises, taps and dies. Stud extractors. Tool crib 
procedures. 

Care and use of portable air or portable electric 
drills, impact tools, grinders. 

Cutting with hacksaw, filing, chipping, scraping. Use 
of bench and pedestal drill presses : drilling, counter- 
sinking, counterboring, tapping, reaming, poHshing, 
lapping. Coolant use. Bench grinder use: grinding 
drill bits, chisels, etc. Fitting bearings, bushings. 
Cutting and flaring tubing. Soldering. Babbitting 
principles. Gasket making. Oxy-acetylene and arc 
welding and cutting. Brazing techniques. Care and 
maintenance of welding equipment. 

Use of rules, straight edges, protractors and squares. 
Feeler gauges, calipers, verniers, micrometers, tele- 
scopic gauges, ball gauges, dial indicators, gauge 
blocks, limit gauges, pressure gauges. Surface finish 
measuring principles. Instrument testing and cali- 
brating procedures. Surface plate use. 

Purpose and types of bolts, nuts, studs, screws and 
tube fittings. Thread identification and classifica- 
tion. Tensile strengths. Installation procedures. 
Tightening torques. Cutting internal and external 
threads. Removing broken studs. Use of heh-coil 
type thread inserts. Purpose and types of rivets, 
keys, springs, flat and lock washers, snap rings, 
circhps, cotter pins. Installation and removal. 
Thread lubricants, sealers and locking compounds. 



Reg. 21 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



89 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Ttum 










Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






General Shop 


Capacities and correct usage of floor cranes, hoists, 






Equipment 


jacks, stands, hydraulic pullers. Power hacksaws. 
Operation and maintenance of degreasing and steam- 
cleaning equipment. Operation and running main- 
tenance of air compressors. 


6 


Internal 


Types and 


Principles of operation; 2 and 4 stroke cycles. 




Combustion 


Definitions 


Gasoline and diesel engines ; types — ^single and multi- 




Engine 




cylinder, in-line, slanted, "V" types, flat or pancake. 




Principles 




Definition of bore, stroke, combustion, piston dis- 
placement, clearance volume, swept volume, com- 
pression ratios and pressures, horsepower, torque. 
Engine formulae. Heat transfer. Combustion 
chamber design and efficiency. 






Engine Components 


Types and function of major engine components: 
cylinder blocks, sleeves and liners, cylinder heads, 
pistons and rings, wrist pins, connecting rods. Bear- 
ings, crankshafts, valves and guides, valve trains, 
camshafts, timing gears or chains, gaskets, manifolds, 
flywheels and ring gears. Vacuum and compression 
tests; valve lash. 

Effects of maladjusted, misaligned, worn, defective 
or improperly installed engine parts or components, 
on engine operation and Ufe. 






Reconditioning 


Effects of dimensional changes due to reboring. 






Effects 


sleeving, grinding heads and blocks, grinding crank- 
shafts and stroking, correcting and align boring 
main bearing saddles, regrinding camshafts; valve, 
valve seat and port grinding, varying head gasket 
thickness. 






Lubricants 


Types and classification: contamination and deteri- 
oration, effect on engine wear. 






Engine Systems 


Types, principles of operation, components: lubrica- 
tion, cooling, carburetion and fuel injection, ignition 
and exhaust systems. 

Effects of maladjusted, inoperative, worn or damaged 
systems on engine operation and performance. 


7 


Trade Tools 


Engine and 


Procedures, sequence and tools required. Parts 




and Procedures 


Component 


marking and identification; maintaining operating 






Disassembly and 


relationship. Removing seized parts. CyHnder 




• 


Cleaning 


ridge and hner removal procedures. Separation of 

ferrous and non-ferrous parts for correct cleaning 

methods. 

Cleaning techniques for ferrous and non-ferrous 

parts. Safety precautions. Cleaning blocks, heads 

and component parts. 






Inspection 


Visual inspection of engine and component parts. 
Use of measuring devices and manufacturer's wear 
Umit specifications. Identification of reusable, re- 



90 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 21 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Cylinder Blocks and 

Heads 

(Cold Repairs) 



Cylinder Boring 



Honing 



Piston Grinding, 
Knurling and 
Regrooving 



Connecting Rod 
Reconditioning 



claimable or scrap parts. 

Detection of cracks, flaws and fatigue in ferrous and 
non-ferrous parts. Use of magna-flux, fluorescent, 
ultrasonic, air, hydraulic or hardness testing equip- 
ment on materials. Interpretation of results and 
appropriate action. 

Techniques, equipment and procedures for "stitch 
ing" cracks in heads and blocks. 



Definition of bore ovality and taper; rebore limits, 
sleeves and liners. 

Boring bar types, characteristics. Set-up, operation 
and maintenance. Bore and crankshaft axes align- 
ment. Cutting tool grinding. Surface finishes, 
honing allowance. 

Block checking. Main bearing cap reinstallation to 
maintain rigidity. Ahgning and boring cyUnders to 
oversize hmits, allowing stock for honing. Boring and 
counter boring for sleeving. Sleeve and liner instal- 
lation procedures. 

Types and characteristics of honing machines, hand 
hones and honing stones. Set-up, operation and 
maintenance. Stone selection, obtaining required 
surface finish and specified fits. Avoidance of taper 
and ovality. 

Honing cyHnders: rough and fine honing procedures 
with or without preboring. Deglazing cylinders; 
cross hatching procedures. Resizing connecting 
rods and honing rod wrist-pin bushings. Honing 
wheel and master cylinders. Honing piston bosses 
for fitting pins. Honing valve guides, king-pin and 
rocker arm bushings. 

Purpose and principles of piston grinding. Set-up 
and operation of piston grinding machine. Avoid- 
ance oJF piston distortion during machining. 
Piston knurling: purpose and methods. Expanding 
pistons to useable tolerance. Piston regrooving: 
restoring ring groove dimensions by oversizing ring 
width or top spacer installation after machining. 

Types and characteristics of connecting rod recon- 
ditioning machines and equipment. Set-up, opera- 
tion and maintenance. Maintaining manufacturers' 
tolerances. Holding centre to centre dimensions and 
parallelism between machined bores. Reconditioning 
rods: grinding parting surfaces for resizing. Cap 
assembly and wrist-pin bushing installation. Boring, 
grinding or honing bores to specified tolerances. 
Fitting pistons to rod assemblies. Alignment check- 
ing and straightening procedures. 



Reg. 21 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



91 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Interference Pin 
Fitting 



Valve Train Servicing 
(Valves, Rocker arms, 
Tappets) 



(Valve Seats) 



(Valve Seat Inserts) 



(Valve Installation) 



Surface Grinding 



Milling 



Flywheel Grinding 



Use of correct tools and techniques for thermal or 
cold press installation. Removing and installing 
press fit piston pins. Fitting oversize pins to worn 
pistons and connecting rods. 

Set-up, operation and maintenance of valve grinders. 
Types of stones and dressing procedures. Regrinding 
valve head seating surface to correct finish and degree 
angle. Maintaining concentricity. Valve usability 
limits. Trueing ends of valve stems. Setting clear- 
ances on free valve assemblies. Recontouring rocker 
arm. Refacing tappets. Reaming blocks for over- 
size tappets. 

Set-up, operation and maintenance of valve seat 
grinders. Types of stones and dressing procedures. 
Regrinding valve seats to correct interference angle, 
width and concentricity to valve guides. Seat and 
valve depth regrinding limits; possible need for seat 
inserts to restore installation height. 

Interference fit and threaded types; construction 
materials. Installation methods. Set-up, operation 
and maintenance of insert installation equipment. 
Counterboring and internal threading procedures for 
respective inserts. Insert installation. 

Procedures for lapping valves and testing contact 
area. 

Complete installation of valve assembhes in blocks or 
heads. Checking valve spring tension; selection of 
shims to compensate for dimensional changes due to 
machining, etc. HydrauHc lifters: use of test equip- 
ment for leakdown tests. Visual check for body and 
contact face wear. 

Set-up, operation and maintenance of surface gi;ind- 
ing equipment. Trueing up distorted surfaces to 
correct finish and dimensions, with minimum stock 
removal. Fixture use. Resurfacing cylinder heads, 
blocks and manifolds. Trueing up mounting sur- 
faces of manifolds, water outlets, bell housings and 
timing covers. 

Set-up, operation and maintenance of milHng ma- 
chines. Work holding, cutter types, speeds and 
feeds. Typical trade related milling operations. 

Set-up, operation and maintenance of flywheel 
grinders. Grinding friction surfaces of all flywheel 
types. Grinding clutch pressure plates: holding 
dimensions and maintaining concentricity with 
mounting surface. 



92 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 21 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Hydraulic Press 
Operations 



Crankshaft Grinding 



Portable Crankshaft 
Grinding 



Camshaft Grinding 



Brake Service 



Bearing Resizing 



Align Boring 



Types, capacities. Safe set-up, operation and main- 
tenance. Procedures for straightening crankshafts, 
camshafts. Use of "V" blocks and dial indicators. 
Pressing bearings and gears on and off shafts. 
Installation of ball, needle and taper roller anti- 
friction bearings. Interference fits; adjusting or pre- 
loading. Rivetting drums to hubs. 

Crankshaft identification. Repairing badly worn or 
damaged journals, straightening and centering pro- 
cedures. Set-up, operation and maintenance of 
crankshaft grinders. Mounting, balancing, dressing 
and forming radii on grinding wheels. Crankshaft 
suspension on centres or chuck. Bearing undersizes. 
Surface finishes. 

Regrinding journal and main bearing surfaces, radii 
and thrust surfaces to correct surface finish and under 
sizes required, maintaining correct centre displace- 
ment, degree relationship and axis concentricity on 
all journals. Inspection and repair procedures for 
internal and external threads, keyways, pilot bearing 
bores, dowel holes. Remachining flywheel mounting 
surfaces. Deburring and chamfering oil holes. 
Polishing bearing surfaces to required finish. Appli- 
cation of rust inhibitor. Bearing surface protection. 

Procedures for emergency field grinding repairs in 
the chassis. Set-up and operation of portable 
grinder and driving mechanism. 

Camshaft repair and straightening. Set-up, opera- 
tion and maintenance of camshaft grinders. Grind- 
ing camshaft lobes and journals. Undersize limits. 
Custom modifications. 

Set-up, operation and maintenance of brake drum 
lathes. Arbor use. Machining and grinding friction 
surfaces, surface finishes. Brake drum safety limits. 
Attaching brake linings to shoes by rivetting, bond- 
ing or bolting; grinding to required radii for correct 
contact with machined drum surface. Set-up, 
operation and maintenance of brake disc machining 
equipment. Finishing brake discs to specified limits. 

Resizing bearings, including machining of thrust 
faces of flanged bearings or thrust washers. Resizing 
rod bearings : fitting and assembling bearings to rods 
and boring to size. 

Preparatory operations: cap grinding or milling; 
installation of bearings and shims or bushings as 
required. Set-up, operation and maintenance of 
align boring machine. 

Procedures for sizing main and camshaft bearings, 
accessory shaft bushings. Boring of distorted or 



Reg. 21 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



93 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Engine Lathe Work 



Balancing Rotating 
and Reciprocating 
Parts 



Final Engine 
Assembly 



Engine Run-in 



misaligned main bearing saddle bores to standard 

dimensions. 

Sleeving of main or camshaft bearing saddles to 

correct damage caused by seized shafts or bearings. 

Set-up, operation and maintenance. Work holding; 
chucks, collets, face plates. Tool bits: selection and 
grinding: speeds and feeds. Centering, facing, turn- 
ing, boring, taper turning, threading and chasing, 
parting operations. 

Production of simple threaded cylindrical parts from 
sketches or drawings. Procedures for turning and 
grooving bushings, repairing pulleys, lightening 
flywheels, trueing up differential cases and worn race 
seats, resizing piston ring grooves, turning and 
undercutting automotive or marine starter and 
generator armature commutators. 

Types and characteristics of mechanical and elec- 
tronic balancing equipment. Set-up and operation. 
Detection of forces creating vibrations in rotating 
parts in all planes. Static and dynamic corrections 
required to correct imbalance through operational 
speed range, by weight application or removal, with- 
out affecting physical properties or strength of parts. 

Checking all new and rebuilt parts, before assembly 
in engine blocks. Fitting reassembly procedures 
and sequence. Checking all fits, clearances and toler- 
ances. Valve timing procedure. Torquing pro- 
cedures and specifications. Testing engine assem- 
blies for excessive oil throw-off: use of oil pressure 
tank. 

Installation of assembled engines in test stands. 
Motoring and dynamometer testing for specified 
periods. Checking oil pressure and compression. 
Inspecting for oil leaks or abnormal noises. Re- 
torquing heads. Resetting valve lash to specifica- 
tions. Painting engines. Preparing and affixing 
reconditioning data tags. Shipping preparation 
procedures. 



Automotive 
Machine Shop 
Management 



Operations 



Costing 



Public Relations 



Business organization : types of ownership. Machine 
shop equipment. Advertising methods. Salesman- 
ship. Business law: financial operations. Govern- 
ment regulations applicable to automotive machine 
shops, journeymen and apprentices. Parts and 
supplies ordering: trade discounts. Quality control: 
acceptable standards, warranties. 

Elementary bookkeeping: average operation times, 
labour, parts and overhead costs. Use of pricing 
lists and manuals. Billing typical reconditioning 
work. 

Proper conduct and business dealings in relation to 
employer, customers and co-workers. Punctuality. 



94 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 21 



Part 2 
Work Experience Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


^ 


General Shop 
Practice 


General 


Safety rules and removal of all safety hazards. 
Use of hand and power tools, measuring instruments, 
fastening devices and general shop equipment. 
Bench work operations. (As detailed in Part 1 . ) 


2 


Internal 
Combustion 
Engine 
Principles 


Types, Components 
and Operations 

Reconditioning 
Effects 

Lubricants 
Engine Systems 


Familiarization with gasoline and diesel engine types, 
designs, component and correct operation. Recog- 
nition of abnormal engine noises and causes. Va- 
cuum and compression testing. Identification of 
effects of maladjusted, misaligned, worn, defective, 
or improperly installed engine parts or components 
on engine operation and hfe. 

Familiarization with effects of dimensional changes 
due to reconditioning and rebuilding operations. 

Familiarization with types and classifications . Effects 
of contamination and deterioration on engine wear. 

Effects of maladjusted, inoperative, worn, leaking or 
damaged lubrication, cooling, carburetion and fuel 
injection ignition and exhaust systems on engine 
operation and performance. 


3 


Trade Tools and 
Procedures 


Engine and 
Component 
Disassembly 

Inspection 

Cylinder Blocks and 

Heads 

(Cold Repairs) 

Cylinder Boring 
Honing 


Dismantling engine and component assemblies. 
Marking and identifying parts. Maintaining oper- 
ating relationship. Cleaning cyUnder blocks, heads 
and component parts by appropriate methods. 

Familiarization with use of measuring devices and 
wear Hmit specifications. Use of test equipment or 
materials to detect cracks, flaws or fatigue in ferrous 
or non-ferrous parts. Identification of reusable, 
reclaimable or scrap parts. 

Crack "stitching" operations. 

Boring bar set-up, operation and maintenance. 
Cutting tool grinding. Block checking and prepara- 
tion. Aligning and boring cyhnders, allowing for 
honing. Boring and counter boring for sleeving. 
Sleeve and liner installation. 

Set-up, operation, maintenance and use of honing 
machines, hand hones. Rough and fine honing cylin- 
ders with or without preboring. Deglazing cyhnders. 
Resizing connecting rods and honing rod wrist-pin 
bushings. Honing wheel and master cylinders, 
piston bosses, valve guides, king-pin and rocker arm 
bushings. 



Reg. 21 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



95 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Work Instruction and Experience 



Piston Grinding, 
Knurling and 
Regrooving 



Connecting Rod 
Reconditioning 



Interference Pin 
Fitting 

Valve and Train 
Servicing 



Surface Grinding 

Milling 

Flywheel Grinding 



Hydraulic Press 
Operations 



Crankshaft Grinding 



Set-up, operation and maintenance of piston grinding 
machines. Knurling pistons to useable tolerances. 
Oversizing ring width or top spacer installation after 
machining. 

Set-up, operation and maintenance of connecting rod 
reconditioning machines and equipment. Recon- 
ditioning rods: resizing, boring, grinding or honing 
bores. Fitting pistons to rod assembhes. Ahgnment 
checking and correction. 

Removing and installing press fit piston pins: ther- 
mal or cold press methods. Fitting oversize pins. 

Set-up, operation and maintenance of valve and 
valve seat grinders. Dressing stones. Regrinding 
valves and valve seats. Trueing ends of valve stems. 
Setting free valve assembly clearances. Recontour- 
ing rocker arms. Refacing tappets. Reaming blocks 
for oversize tappets. Set-up, operation and main- 
tenance of interference fit and threaded insert in- 
stallation equipment. Insert installation and finish- 
ing. Set-up, operation and maintenance of equip- 
ment for resizing or reaming valve guides and boring 
integral heads for thin-wall guides. Valve guide in- 
stallation and finishing. Lapping valves and testing 
contact areas. Installation of valve assemblies in 
cyhnder heads or blocks. Hydraulic hfter leak-down 
tests and visual wear checks. 

Set-up, operation and maintenance of surface grind- 
ing equipment. Resurfacing cyhnder heads, blocks 
and manifolds. Trueing up mounting surfaces 
manifolds, water outlets, bell housings and timing 
covers. 

Set-up, operation and maintenance of milling ma- 
chines. Trade related milhng operations. 

Set-up, operation and maintenance of flywheel 
grinders. Grinding all flywheel types. Grinding 
clutch pressure plates. 

Straightening crankshafts and camshafts. Pressing 
bearings and gears on and off shafts. 
Installation of ball, needle and taper roller bearings. 
Rivetting drums to hubs. 

Set-up, operation and maintenance of crankshaft 
grinders: mounting, balancing, dressing grinding 
wheels. 

Crankshaft preparation. Regrinding journal and 
main bearing surfaces, radii and thrust surfaces. 
Deburring and chamfering oil holes. Pohshing 



96 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 21 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 












Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 








bearing surfaces. Repairing internal and external 
threads, key ways, pilot bearing bores, dowel holes. 
Remachining flywheel mounting surfaces. Rust 
inhibitor appUcation and bearing surface protection. 






Portable 
Crankshaft Grinding 


Set-up and operation of portable grinder and driving 
mechanism. 






Camshaft Grinding 


Set-up, operation and maintenance of camshaft 
grinders. Grinding camshaft lobes and journals. 
Custom modifications. 






Brake Service 


Set-up and operation of brake drum lathes. Machin- 
ing and grinding drums. Rivetting, bonding or 
bolting Unings to shoes: facing to required radii. 
Set-up, operation and maintenance of brake disc 
machining equipment . Finishing brake discs . 






Bearing Resizing 


Resizing bearings, including machining flanged 

bearing thrust faces and thrust washers. Resizing 
rod bearings. 






Align Boring 


Set-up, operation and maintenance of ahgn boring 
machine. Sizing main and camshaft bearings, ac- 
cessory shaft bushings. Boring distorted or mis- 
aligned main bearing saddle bores to standard. 
Sleeving main or camshaft bearing saddles to correct 
damage. 






Engine Lathe Work 


Lathe set-up, operation and maintenance. Selecting 
and grinding tool bits. Turning and grooving bush- 
ings, repairing pulleys, hghtening flywheels, trueing- 
up differential cases and worn race seats, resizing 
piston ring grooves, turning and undercutting auto- 
motive or marine starter and generator armature 
commutators. 






Balancing Rotating 
and Reciprocating 
Parts 


Set-up, operation and maintenance of mechanical 
and electronic balancing equipment. Making static 
and dynamic corrections to correct imbalance. 






Final Engine 
Assembly 


Preassembly check of new and rebuilt parts. Engine 
reassembly and fitting. Checking all fits, clearances 
and tolerances. Valve timing. Torquing. Testing 
for excessive oil throw-off. 






Engine Run-in 


Use of test stands. Motoring engines or dynamo- 
meter testing. Checking oil pressure, compression, 
output: oil leaks or abnormal noises. Retorquing 
heads. Resetting valve lash. Engine painting, 
tagging and shipping preparation. 



O. Reg. 97/69, Sched. 



Reg. 22 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



97 



REGULATION 22 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



AUTOMOTIVE PAINTER 

1. In this Regulation,. 

{a) "automotive painter" means a person 
engaged in the refinishing of motor vehicle 
bodies who, 

(i) sands, spot fills, primes and paints, 

(ii) dries or bakes newly painted surfaces , 

(iii) masks and tapes for multi-tone paint 
work and protective requirements, 

(iv) applies decals, transfers, stencils and 
other types of identification to fin- 
ished paint work, 

(v) mixes paint and components and 
matches colours, and 

(vi) refinishes galvanized outer panels 
and anodized aluminum moulding; 

{b) "certified trade" means the trade of auto- 
motive painter ; 

(c) "motor vehicle" means a vehicle propelled 
by an internal combustion engine, or 
operated or controlled from a vehicle pro- 
pelled by an internal combustion engine, 
that is registered for use on a highway 
under The Highway Traffic Act and is used 
primarily for the transport of persons, 
equipment or goods but does not include a 
vehicle, 

(i) operated only on rails, 

(ii) used for transportation solely within 
an employer's actual place of busi- 
ness, or 

(iii) used for farming operations but not 
used for carrying a load. O. Reg. 
102/69, s. 1. 

2. The trade of automotive painter is designated 
as a certified trade for the purposes of the Act. 
O. Reg. 102/69, s. 2. 

3. No person shall become an apprentice in the 
certified trade unless he has successfully completed 



Grade 8 in Ontario or has such other academic quali- 
fication that, in the opinion of the Director, is equiva- 
lent thereto. O. Reg. 102/69, s. 3. 

4. An apprentice training program for the certi- 
fied trade is established and shall consist of, 

{a) training and instruction at full-time educa- 
tional day classes provided at a College of 
Applied Arts and Technology or in classes 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto ; and 

(b) practical training and instruction provided 
by an employer of the apprentice. 



in the subjects contained in Parts 
Schedule. O. Reg. 102/69, s. 4. 



and 2 of the 



5. An apprentice shall complete two periods of 
training and instruction of 1800 hours per period. 
O. Reg. 102/69, s. 5. 

6. Sections 8 and 9 and subsections 2 and 4 of sec- 
tion 10 of the Act do not apply to any person who 
works or is employed in the certified trade. O. Reg. 
102/69, s. 6. 

7. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the certi- 
fied trade whether for his regular daily hours or for 
hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall not be 
less than, 

{a) 60 per cent during the first period of training 
and instruction ; and 

{b) 80 per cent during the second period of train- 
ing and instruction, 

of the average rate of wages for journeymen em- 
ployed by the employer in that trade or, where the 
employer is the only journeyman employed, of the 
average rate of wages for journeyman in the area. 
O. Reg. 102/69, s. 7. 

8. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
are the subjects set out in Parts 1 and 2 of the Sched- 
ule. O. Reg. 102/69. s. 8. 

9. A certificate of qualification in the certified 
trade remains in force until cancelled or suspended 
in accordance with the regulations. O. Reg. 102/69, 
S.9. 



98 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 22 



Schedule 

AUTOMOTIVE PAINTER 

Part 1 

In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Mathematics 


Arithmetic 
Geometry 


Addition, subtraction and division of whole numbers 
and fractions, ratio and proportion, areas and volumes. 

Lines, planes and angles. 


2 


Science 


Physics 
Mechanics 


Basic laws and principles, formulae. (Given as re- 
quired in shop instruction.) 


3 


English 


Basic Usag6 and 

Business 

Communications 


Trade terminology and usage. Letter and report 
writing. Work and parts orders. Interpretation 
and use of manufacturers' manuals. 


4 


General Shop 
Practice 


Safety 

Hand Tools 

Power Tools 
Fastening Devices 

General Paint-Shop 
Equipment 


Safety rules and safe operating procedures. First aid. 
Fire prevention. Use and maintenance of firefighting 
equipment. 

Handling of gasoline, oils, paints, thinners and sol- 
vents. Dangers of spontaneous combustion. Danger 
of carbon monoxide fumes. Correct use of hfting and 
hoisting equipment. Good housekeeping. 

Care and use of hammers, screwdrivers, wrenches, 
sockets, pliers, vise-grips, drill bits, hacksaws, putty 
knives, scrapers, paint brushes, blowgun and striping 
tools. 

Care and use of bench grinders, air and electric drills, 
orbital and disc sanders, polishers and impact tools. 

Purpose and types of bolts, nuts, studs, screws, speed 
nuts, trim clips, flat and lock washers, etc. Instal- 
lation and removal. 

Capacities and correct usage of hoists, jacks, stands. 
Operation and maintenance of degreasing and steam- 
cleaning equipment. 


5 


Spray Painting 
Equipment 


Paint Spray Guns 

Transformers 
(Regulators and 
Condensers) 


Types, principles of operation, component parts, gun 
conditions and remedies. Material container types. 
Spray gun maintenance. Types, construction, and 
use of air and fluid hoses, connections, couplings and 
adaptors. Pressure drop. 

Types and purpose. Installation. Minimum pipe 
sizes. Pressure drop. Moisture and oil problems. 
Maintenance procedures. 



Reg. 22 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



99 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Air Compressors 

Respirators and Masks 
Spray Booths 

Drying Equipment 


Types and purpose, single and 2-stage; components, 
C.F.M. capacities. Installation and basic main- 
tenance. 

Organic vapor and dust types. Correct usage and 
servicing. 

Types, purpose and operation. Dry and wash types. 
Special spray booth features. Lights, filters, fans. 
Maintenance procedures. 

Convection (Direct heat) and radiation (Infra-Red) 
drying and baking ovens. Operation and main- 
tenance. Use of portable drying equipment. 


6 


Spraying 
Techniques 


Critical Factors 


Importance of correct gun type, fluid tip and air cap 
combination, fluid and spreader adjustment and 
atomizing air pressure. Spray patterns. Gun position ; 
distance, stroking, triggering, speed and overlap. 
Practice spraying of various shaped panels in hori- 
zontal and vertical positions. 


7 


Surface 

Preparation 

Materials 


Types, Purpose, 
Description and 
Correct Usage 


Paint finish cleaning solvents. Metal conditioners. 
Waterproof and dry type sandpapers, portable sander 
discs; grain, backing and bonding. Paint removers. 
Hot and cold stripping. Sand blasting, power and 
manual sanding. Masking materials — tapes, papers, 
compounds. Masking machines. "Tack-rags". 


8 


Surface 
Preparation 


Preparation 
Procedures 


Determination of surface condition. Surface analy- 
sis. Adhesion testing. Preparation of surfaces in 
good and poor condition and "green" or freshly 
painted surfaces. Masking and sanding techniques. 
"Featheredging". Paper grade; Wet or dry, hand or 
power sanding. 

Blowing and "Tacking". Metal conditioning. Wax, 
silicone and metal conditioner removal. 
Removal and reinstallation of exterior trim, em- 
blems, hardware, and light assemblies. Elementary 
electrical wiring and testing procedures. 


9 


Refinishing 
Materials and 
Methods 


Purpose, Description, 
Characteristics and 
Apphcation Methods 


Primers, primer-surf acers, putty, sealers, solid colours 
and metaUics. Colour material formulation; acrylic 
enamels and lacquers, alkyd (PX) and nitro-cellulose 
lacquers. Drying characteristics. Effects of tem- 
perature and humidity. 

Thinners or reducers. Formulation ; accelerators and 
retarders. Mixing and reduction. Viscosity checks. 
Straining. Use of sihcone additives. Tests for paint 
type (old finish). Paint compatibility — intermixing, 
etc. Factors afifecting refinish colour match. Colour 
codes. Matching and tinting. Force drying and baking ; 
use of baking converters. Rubbing and polishing 
compounds ; Hand and machine application. 



100 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 22 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be (iiven 






Paint Finish 
Conditions 

Spot Repair and 
Touch-up 

Clean-Up Operations 


Identification of paint conditions. Causes and cor- 
rective action. Colour coat mil thickness requirements 
and measurement. 

Use of enamels, acrylics and lacquers for spot repairs 
and touch-up. Blending to reduce or ehminate con- 
trast. 

Removal of overspray from glass, chrome and paint. 
Effects of solvents on plastic trim. Tire dressings. 


10 


Paint Finish 
Deterioration 


Causes of 
Deterioration 


Identification of adverse effects of elements and 
materials on paint finish. 


11 


Paint Finish Care 


Purpose and Use of 
Polishes and Cleaners 


Wax and silicone-wax types. Effects of cleaners and 
polishes on acrylics, lacquers and enamels. 
Polishing requirements and precautions for newly 
refinished vehicles. Paint finish maintenance. 


12 


Specialty 
Refinishing 


Materials and 
Procedures 


Refinishing of galvanized outer panels and anodized 
aluminum moulding insert areas. 
Multi-colour spatter finishes (trunk interiors, floors, 
etc.) Simulated vinyl hard-top finishes. Striping; 
use of masking tape, lining brush and wheel machine. 
Application of decals and transfers. "Two-toning". 


13 


Estimating and 

Shop 

Management 


Estimating and 
Factors to be 
Considered 

Quality Control 


Estimating procedures; condition of previous paint 
job. Average operation times. Labour, material, 
overhead costs. Use of flat rate manual. Typical 
estimates and costing of complete or partial paint 
jobs. 

Quality of workmanship. Acceptable standards. 



Part 2 
Work Experience Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


General Shop 
Practice 


General 


Safety rules and removal of all safety hazards. Use of 
hand and power tools, fastening devices and general 
paint-shop equipment. (As detailed in Part 1.) 



Reg. 22 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



101 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 




Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


2 


Spray Painting 
Equipment 


Use, Operation and 
Maintenance 


Familiarization with use, operation and iiiamtfiiani c 
of spray guns, air and fluid hoses and fittings, trans- 
formers, air compressors, spray booths, respirators 
and masks. Drying and baking ovens and portable 
drying equipment. 


3 


Surface 
Preparation 


Surface Condition 


Analysis of surface condition. Identification ot ad- 
verse effects of elements and materials on paint finish. 
Testing for adhesion, paint types, finish age and 
siHcones. 






Preparation 
Procedures 


Removal of mouldings, trim, hardware and emblems 
as required. 

Selection and use of paint finish cleaning solvents, 
paint removers if required and baking equipment for 
"Green" or freshly painted vehicles. 

Blowing and masking. Spot sanding and feather- 
edging of damaged or repaired areas, or complete 
overall sanding as required. Selection and use ot drv 
or waterproof sandpapers by hand or power sanding. 

Selection and use of metal conditioners. 

Spot or overall apphcation of primers and primer 
surfacers as required. Mixing and reduction. 

Final complete overall sanding and primer touch-up 
of bare metal. 


4 


Refinishing 
Operations 


Colour Match 


Refinish colour matching and tinting. Use of colour 
codes. 






Mixing and 
Reduction 


Selection of thinners or reducers. Mixing and reduc- 
tion of sealers, acryhc enamels and lacquers, alkyd 
(PX) and nitro-cellulose lacquers; solid colours and 
metallics. 






Additives and 
Viscosities 


Use of accelerators and retarders, silicone additives 
and baking converters. Checking viscosities. Strain- 
ing. 






Testing and Checking 
Procedures 


Testing gun operation and spray pattern. Adjusting 
atomizing and fluid pressures. Checking sprav booth 
light and exhaust fan operation. Rechecking mask- 
ing and installing wheel covers. Blowing-down and 
"tacking". 






Sealer and Finish 
Coats 


Spray application of sealers and finish materials in 
accordance with manufacturer's recommendations. 






Paint Finish 
Conditions 


FamiUarization with causes of paint conditions, and 
corrective action. 



102 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 22 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Spot Repair and 
Touch-up 

Drying or Baking 
Polishing Lacquers 
Clean-up 


Blending of finishing coats into adjacent areas to 
reduce or ehminate contrast. 

Air dry, force dry or baking of finish coats according 

to type of material applied. 

Removal of masking materials. 

Hand or power application of rubbing compounds or 

pohshes. 

Removing overspray from glass, chrome, paint and 
trim. Applying tire dressings. Reinstallation ol 
mouldings, trim, hardware, etc. and light assembhes 
as required. Testing for correct light operation. 


5 


Paint Finish Care 


Use of Polishes and 
Cleaners 


FamiUarization with polishing requirements and pre- 
cautions for newly refinished vehicles and effects of 
cleaners and polishes on acrylics, lacquers and 
enamels. 


6 


Specialty 
Refinishing 


Materials and 
Procedures 


Refinishing of galvanized outer panels and anodized 
aluminum moulding insert areas. Application of 
multi-colour spatter finishes (trunk interiors, floors, 
etc.), simulated vinyl hard-top finishes. Striping. 
Application of decals and transfers. "Two-toning". 


7 


Estimating and 

Shop 

Management 


Estimating 
Procedures 

Quality Control 

Disciphne and 
Public Relations 


Preparation of estimates. Costing of complete or 
partial paint jobs. Use of flat rate manual. 

Acceptable standards of workmanship. 

Attitude towards employer, insurance adjuster, 
customers and fellow workers. 



O. Reg. 102/69. Sched. 



Reg. 23 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



103 



REGULATION 23 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



BAKERS 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "baker" means a person who prepares all 
manner of breads, pastries, pies, tarts, cakes, 
cookies and other baked goods by mixing or 
blending a variety of ingredients and baking 
them in an oven, and who ices, decorates, 
fills or otherwise finishes such baked goods ; 

{b) "trade" means the trade of baker. O. Reg. 
165/69, s. 1. 

2. — (1) An apprentice training program in the 
trade is estabhshed and shall consist of, 

(a) training and instruction at full time edu- 
cational day classes provided at a College of 
Applied Arts and Technology or in courses 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto, in the subjects contained 
in Schedule 1 ; and 

(b) practical training and instruction provided 
by the employer of the apprentice in the 
subjects contained in Schedule 2. 

(2) An apprentice shall complete two periods of 
training and instruction of 2000 hours per period. O . 
Reg. 165/69, s. 2. 



3. No person shall become an apprentice in the 
trade unless, 

{a) he has successfully completed Grade 9 in 
Ontario or has such other academic quali- 
fication that, in the opinion of the Director, 
is equivalent thereto ; or 

{b) he has successfully completed Grade 8 in 
Ontario or has such other academic quali- 
fication that, in the opinion of the Director, 
is equivalent thereto and has successfully 



completed one year of training and instruc- 
tion approved by the Director or has worked 
in the trade for one year. O. Reg. 
165/69, s. 3. 

4. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the 
trade whether for his regular daily hours or for hours 
in excess of his daily hours shall not be less than, 

(a) 60 per cent during the first period of training 
and instruction ; and 

(b) 80 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction, 

of the average rate of wages or its equivalent for 
journeymen in the trade in the area. O. Reg. 165/69. 

s.4. 

5. Where the employer is a journeyman in the 
trade, the number of apprentices employed, 

{a) shall not exceed one where the employer is 
the only journeyman engaged in the trade ; 
and 

{b) shall not exceed one additional apprentice 
for every two additional journeymen em- 
ployed by the employer in the trade. O. 
Reg. 165/69, s. 5. 

6. Where the employer is not a journeyman in the 
trade, the number of apprentices employed, 

{a) shall not exceed one for the first journeyman 
employed by the employer ; and 

(6) shall not exceed one additional apprentice 
for every two additional journeymen em- 
ployed in the trade by the employer. O. 
Reg. 165/69, s. 6. 

7. Sections 8 and 9 of the Act do not apply to any 
DP'^son who works or is employed in the trade. O. 
Reg. 165/69, s. 7. 



104 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 23 



Schedule 1 

BAKER 

In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Language and 
Communication 


Composition 
Business Writing 


N'ocabulary, grammar, sentence and paragraph 
structure and oral composition. 

Sample business letters, format, tone and layout. 
Report writing. 


2 


Mathematics 


Arithmetic 

Business 
Mathematics 


Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. 
Fractions, decimals, percentage, interest and dis- 
counts. Units of capacity and weight. Ratio and 
proportion. 

Basic bookkeeping, balance sheets, costing, financial 
statements, retaiUng, contracts and credit. In- 
surance, banking and interest rates. 


3 


General Shop 
Practice 


Safety 
Sanitation 

Ingredients 


Accident prevention, precautions during operation of 
machinery, explosive danger of dust, safe use of ovens 
and boilers. First aid measures and fire prevention. 

Personal hygiene and shop cleanhness. Proper use 
of cleaning agents, care of perishable goods. Safe 
use of pesticides and fungicides. Health regulations. 
Food and Drug Act (Canada) requirements. 

Measuring and sifting, weights and measures, con- 
version tables used. Terminology of baking. Nutri- 
tion requirements. Types of flour. Aerating agents, 
yeasts, sugars, fats, milk and eggs and their uses in 
baking. Flavourings, spices and colourings. Impor- 
tance of labelling. 


4 


Fermented 
Goods 


Preparation 
Baking 


Types of flour used in baking fermented goods ; yeast 
usage, fermentation process, chemical additives, 
basic dough composition. Use of prepared mixes for 
pressure and rolHng machines and refrigeration 
effects. Effects of heat and humidity. Liquid and 
vclumetric measure, ratio and proportion. Continu- 
ous mix processing systems for bread, buns and rolls. 
Use of oxidizing agents, stabilizers and shortening 
Makes. Formula construction and percentage, pro- 
duction rates, pump calibration data. 

Types of ovens used ; factors in the design of ovens. 
Time and temperature requirements for various 
baked goods. Calculation of yield. 


5 


Cakes 


Preparation 


Types of cakes; yellow or white, sponge, fruit and 
pound. Ingredients used in each type ; flour, aerating 
agents and methods of aerating, such as whipping. 



Reg. 23 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



105 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be (iiven 






Baking 
Decorating 


laminating and aerating machines. Formulae used; 
balancing formulae, effects of time and temperature, 
working and storage temperatures for various in- 
gredients. Portioning and filling containers. 

Chemical and physical changes during baking. Time, 
temperature and method of baking; loading ovens 
and use of oven controls. Indications of sufficient 
baking; faults and corrective actions. CooUng and 
storage, humidity and temperature control. Packag- 
ing, freezing and defrosting. 

Types of icing used; fondants, butter, decorative, 
and additional decorations on cakes. Ingredients 
used and techniques of mixing and application. 


6 


Pies, Tarts 
and Cookies 


Pastries 
Preparation 

Baking and 
Storing Pastries 

Cookies 
Preparation 

Baking and 
Storing Cookies 


Fats and shortening used, dry ingredients, types 
of flour and other additives, liquids used. Mixing 
ingredients by hand and machine; under and over 
mixing. Rolling pastry; techniques applicable. 

Types of ovens and controls; times for baking, indi- 
cation when properly baked. Storing of pies and 
tarts; packaging methods, freezing and storing 
methods. 

Types and kinds of flour, leavening agents, sweeten- 
ing additives; blending fats and shortening, hquids 
used, eggs and flavourings. Adding nuts, fruits and 
colouring. Planning techniques. 

Oven temperatures; indication of sufficient baking, 
removal of cookies from pans, use of cooHng racks. 
Decorating cookies ; types appHcable and techniques 
used. Storing and packaging cookies; conditions of 
storage. 


7 


Fillings and 
Icings 


Fillings 

Savory Fillings 
Icings 


Types of filHngs; fruit, custard and cream; methods 
of preparation for each; additives, thickening agents 
and consistency required. Filling techniques. Times 
and temperatures for pre-cooking and cooking of 
fillings. Handling dried, frozen, canned and fresh 
fruits, fresh cream. Making custards. Effects of 
boiling on sugars, starches and eggs. 

Importance of quick cooling meat, fish and cheese 
fillings. Storage of filhngs. 

Types of icings, and meringues; butter icing, deco- 
rative icing and fondants. Preparation methods; 
use of ingredients and blending techniques. Manu- 
facture and mixing of chocolate. Principles of sugar 
boiling, cake coatings and royal icings and techniques 
applicable. Use of decorative tube and tips. Storage 
of icings. 



106 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 23 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


8 


Management 


Business 
Administration 


Stock control, costing, production scheduling, labour 
utilization, licensing regulations, leasing, taxes, 
business economics, profit requirements. 



Schedule 2 
BAKER 

Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 




General Shop 
Practices 


Safety 

Sanitation and 
Hygiene 

Ingredients 
Equipment 


Shop safety rules and precautions. JFirst aid equip- 
ment location and usage. Fire prevention devices, 
locations and usage. 

Personal and shop cleanliness measures. Controlled 
application of pesticides and fungicides. 

Use of measuring, sifting and weighing devices. 
Application of conversion tables. Types of flour and 
identification. 

Types of power machines, such as mixers and rollers. 
Capacities, operation and controls applicable ; refrig- 
eration and storage facilities; their u«^ and control. 
Use of hand utensils, pots, pans and trays. ()ven> 
used, types, operation, control features and |)ur|K)>c 


2 


Fermented 
Goods 


Preparation 
Baking 


Dough mixing techniques for various products, oal 
culating finished weights, shaping and scoring. Time 
and temperature requirements for various dough 
mixes before baking. 

Oven control criteria, revolving oven operation and 
cooling procedures. Time and temperature require- 
ments for various bakes. 


3 


Cakes 


Preparation 
Baking 


Methods of making different types of cakes. Hand 
and machine mixing requirements; sugar and flour 
batter mixing, blending and whipping. Scone and 
powder- raised goods preparation. 

Baking times, temperatures; high-ratio cake making: 
invert sugar in cakes. 



Reg. 23 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



107 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


4 


Pies. Tarts 
and Cookies 


Pastries 
Preparation 

Baking Pastries 

Cookies Preparation 

Baking and Storing 
Cookies 


Mixing pies, tarts and short pastries and puff- 
pastry. 

Times and temperatures for proper baking of pastries. 

Mixing of cookie dough, additives used; use of choco- 
late in cookies. 

Times and temperatures for baking, cooling require- 
ments and cookie decoration. Packaging and storing 
cookies. 


5 


Fillings and 
Icings 


Fillings 
Icings 


Making up pie and tart fillings, handling fresh, 
frozen, canned and dried fruit, savory fillings. 
Making jellies and custards, handhng and using 
fresh cream. 

Preparation of fondants, icings, creams, meringues, 
almond paste, gum paste and royal icings. Cake 
coating techniques, decorating and pull-sugar work. 


6 


Management 


Business 
Administration 


Stock taking and inventory control, bookkeeping, 
display techniques, packaging, costing and produc- 
tion scheduling. 0. Reg. 165/69, Sched. 2. 



108 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 24 



REGULATION 24 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



BARBERING SCHOOLS 

1. In this Regulation, "barbering school" means 
any school, college, business institution or establish- 
ment that trains or professes to train persons to qualify 
for examination for a certificate of qualification in the 
certified trade of barber but does not include, 

(a) a barber shop in which apprentices are 
employed ; or 

{b) a school or college that is under the jurisdic- 
tion of the Department of Education. O. 
Reg. 247/69, s. I. 

2. No person shall operate a barbering school, 

{a) unless he is the holder of a hcence to operate 
a barbering school ; and 

{b) except in accordance with the Act and this 
Regulation. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 2. 

3. — ( 1 ) A licence to operate a barbering school shall 
be in Form 1 and the fee for a licence to operate a 
barbering school or a renewal thereof is $50. 

(2) An application for a licence to operate a bar- 
bering school shall be in Form 2 and shall be made to 
the Director. 

(3) A Hcence to operate a barbering school expires 
with the 31st day of December in the year in which it 
is issued. 

(4) An appHcation for renewal of a Hcence to 
operate a barbering school shall be made to the 
Director not later than the 1st day of December in 
each year. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 3. 



4. — ( 1 ) The Director may refuse to issue or renew 
or may revoke a licence to operate a barbering school 
for reasonable cause, and shall give notice of the 
decision to the applicant or Hcensee, as the case may 
be. 

(2) The Director shaU not take action under sub- 
section 1 until after conducting a hearing for which 
notice in writing has been sent by registered mail to 
the applicant or Hcensee, as the case may be, to his 
last known address containing details of the grounds 
for such proposed refusal or revocation and the date, 
time and place of the hearing. 

(3) Notice of the hearing shall be mailed seven 
clear days before the date thereof and if the applicant 
or Hcensee, as the case may be, fails to attend on the 
date and at the time and place appointed, the hear- 



ing may proceed and the Director may make a 
decision in his absence. 

(4) At the hearing, the applicant or Hcensee, as the 
case may be, shall be entitled to be represented by 
counsel or by an agent, and to hear the evidence, 
to cross-examine, to call witnesses and to present 
argument. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 4. 

5. — (1) Where the Director refuses to issue or 
renew or revokes a licence to operate a barbering 
school, an applicant or licensee, as the case may be, 
may by notice in writing within thirty days of the 
notice of the decision, appeal the decision of the 
Director to the Minister or such other person as is 
designated in writing by the Minister for the purpose. 

(2) The Minister or such other person designated 
by him shall set the date, time and place for the 
hearing of the appeal, and notice of such hearing 
shall be sent by registered mail to the person 
appeaHng. 

(3) If the person appeaHng fails to attend the 
hearing of the appeal on the date and at the time and 
place appointed, the hearing may proceed and a 
decision may be made in his absence. 

(4) At the hearing of the appeal, the person 
appeaHng shaU be entitled to be represented by 
counsel or by an agent, and to hear evidence, to cross- 
examine, to call witnesses and to present argument. 

(5) The Minister or such other person designated 
by him shall hear the evidence and submissions and 
shall confirm the decision of the Director or order the 
licence to be issued, renewed or reinstated. O. Reg. 
247/69, s. 5. 



6. — (1) No holder of a Hcence to operate a bar- 
bering school shall enter into a contract to provide 
training and instruction with a candidate for enrol- 
ment unless the candidate, 

(a) is at least sixteen years of age ; and 

(b) has completed Grade 9 in Ontario or has 
such other academic qualification that, in 
the opinion of the Director, is equivalent 
thereto, 

and unless the Hcensee has, 

(c) notified the Director of the proposed enrol- 
ment of the candidate and has received con- 
firmation of the Director's approval of the 
proposed enrolment. 



Reg. 24 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



109 



(2) A copy of the executed contract shall be filed 
by the licensee with the Director and a fee of $5 shall 
be paid by the licensee to the Director for regist- 
ration of the enrolment of the candidate. 

(3) No holder of a licence to operate a barbering 
school shall give training or instruction to a student 
unless he complies with subsections 1 and 2. O. 
Reg. 247/69, s. 6. 

7. — (1) The period of training and instruction in a 
barbering school shall be at least 1200 hours unless 
otherwise specified in writing by the Director. 

(2) Subsection 1 does not apply to a holder of a 
certificate of qualification in the certified trade of 
barber. 

(3) No student in a barbering school shall accept 
any remuneration for work performed in the school. 
O. Reg. 247/69. s. 7. 

8. A holder of a licence to operate a barbering 
school shall provide training and instruction in the 
subjects contained in Schedules 1 and 2 to Regulation 
25 of Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1970. O. Reg. 
247/69. s. 8. 

9. A barbering school shall employ at least one 
instructor for each ten students enrolled and in atten- 
dance at the school. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 9. 

10. Every instructor shall, 

(a) be the holder of a certificate of quahfication 
in the certified trade of barber for at least 
three years ; and 

{b) be a graduate of a teacher-training course 
that is approved by the Director, 

and no instructor shall perform any barbering services 
for a customer of the school except while he is 
actually demonstrating to a student or accept any 
remuneration or gratuity from a customer for work 
performed in the school. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 10. 

11. Where the Director so requires, an instructor 
or student shall furnish, within a reasonable time, a 
certificate of a legally qualified medical practitioner 
that the instructor or student is not suffering from 
any communicable disease. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 11. 

12. No sign, placard or other advertising matter 
shall be used in connection with a barbering school 
unless it has been approved by the Director. O. Reg. 
247/69, s. 12. 

13. — (1) The premises of a barbering school shall 
be identified by a sign visible from the street and 
where a barbering school and a barber shop are 
operated on the same premises, they shall be separ- 
ated by a solid partition reaching from the floor to the 
ceiling and the school shall have a separate 
entrance. 



(2) The holder of a hcence to operate a barbering 
school shall ensure that the school is properly equipped 
for teaching trade theory and practice. 

(3) Each chair in a barbering school used for the 
purpose of barbering shall be placed so that the centre 
of its base is at least, 

(a) 6 feet distant from the centre of the base of 
any other such chair ; and 

(b) 3^2 feet distant from any wall or cabinet 
that is used for instructional purposes. 
O. Reg. 247/69, s. 13. 



14. The premises of a barbering school shall be, 

(a) properly painted or papered ; 

(b) properly lighted and ventilated ; 

(c) supplied with an ample supply of hot and 
cold running water ; 

{d) supplied with pure drinking water ; and 

{e) kept in a clean and sanitary condition, 

and the licensee shall ensure that, 

(/) any repairs required to keep the premises 
in a safe and habitable condition are 
made ; and 

{g) the cause of any effluvia arising from any 
defective drain or plumbing is removed and 
the defect is corrected. O. Reg. 247/69, 
s. 14. 



15. — (1) The holder of a licence to operate a bar- 
bering school shall ensure that separate washrooms 
and toilet rooms for male persons and female persons, 
if any, are provided and the rooms shall, 

{a) be conveniently accessible ; and 

(b) have legible signs indicating for which sex 
the room is provided and be constructed so 
as to prevent a view of their facilities from 
outside the room. 

(2) The holder of a licence to operate a barbering 
school shall ensure that, 

{a) a washroom contains one washbasin for 
each fifteen persons or fraction thereof; 

(b) a toilet room provided for male persons con- 
tains not less than one enclosed flush toilet 
provided with a suitable door and latch and 
one urinal for each twenty-five male persons 
or fraction thereof ; and 



no 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 24 



(c) a toilet room provided for female persons, 
if any, contains not less than one enclosed 
flush toilet provided with a suitable door and 
latch for each fifteen female persons. O. 
Reg. 247/69, s. 15. 

16. Every student in a barbering school shall be 
given a minimum of one-half hour for lunch. O. 
Reg. 247/69, s. 16. 

17. Customers of a barbering school shall be 
charged such prices for operations as the Director 
approves, and a list of such prices shall be pro- 
minently displayed. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 17. 

18. — (1) No training or instruction shall be given 
in a barbering school, 

(a) on a Saturday or a holiday ; and 

{b) before 9.00 a.m. or after 6.00 p.m. on any 
other day. 

(2) No weekly period of training and instruction 
shall exceed a total of forty hours for any student. 
O. Reg. 247/69, s. 18. 

19. Every student and instructor in a barbering 
school shall wear a clean light-coloured coat or 
smock of washable material. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 19. 

20. Every student and instructor shall thoroughly 
clean his hands immediately before attending to a 
customer. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 20. 

21. — (1) All combs, clippers, scissors, shaving 
brushes, blackhead removers, finger bowls, files, 
pushers, buffers and all massage and scalp applicators 
and other instruments shall be thoroughly cleansed 
and sterilized by immersion in boiling water, or in a 
suitable antiseptic solution, immediately before each 
use and instruments that cannot be so treated shall 
not be used. 

(2) All hair brushes shall be immersed in a strong 
antiseptic solution, rinsed in clear water and dried 
with a clean towel or by heat, before being used on a 
customer. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 21. 

22. For shampooing and shaving purposes, lather 
shall be made only from powdered or liquid soap or 
from shaving cream or other preparations contained 
in non-reusable tubes or pressurized containers and 
if the lather is prepared in a shaving mug, the 
mug shall be thoroughly cleansed before each use. 
O. Reg. 247/69, s. 22. 

23. — (1) A clean towel shall be placed on the head- 
rest of every chair used for the purpose of barbering 
and a fresh, clean towel shall be used for each 
customer. 

(2) A fresh, clean neck band or towel shall be 
placed around the neck of each customer immediately 
under the hair cloth. 



(3) Each towel or steamer used shall be fresh and 
clean. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 23. 

24. Hair cloths and all other Unen used in the 
barbering school shall be kept clean and freshly 
laundered. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 24. 

25. No caustic or styptic pencil shall be used on a 
customer and no alum or other astringent shall be 
apphed except in powder or Hquid form. O. Reg. 
247/69, s. 25. 

26. No powder puff or sponge shall be used, but 
fresh, sterilized cotton wadding shall be used in lieu 
thereof for each customer. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 26. 

27. No barbering shall be performed on a customer 
where a rash is present on the surface to be treated 
or the surface is inflamed. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 27. 

28. No sink or basin used for domestic purposes 
shall be used in conj unction with any barbering school. 
O. Reg. 247/69, s. 28. 

29. A room shall be provided to be used for eating 
purposes and no food shall be consumed in the 
barbering school in a place other than that room. 
O. Reg. 247/69, s. 29. 

30. No barbering school shall be used for residen- 
tial purposes. O. Reg. 247/69, s. 30. 

Form 1 

The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen' s Qualification Act 

LICENCE TO OPERATE A 
BARBERING SCHOOL 

Under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Quali- 
fication Act and the regulations, and subject to 
the limitations thereof, this licence is issued to 



(name) 



of, 



(address) 
to operate a barbering school under the name : 



This licence expires with the day of . 



19, 



Dated at Toronto, this day of . 



19, 



(signature of issuer) 
O. Reg. 247/69, Form ] 



Reg. 24 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



111 



Form 2 

The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 

APPLICATION FOR LICENCE TO OPERATE 
A BARBERING SCHOOL 



To: 



Director, 

Industrial Training Branch, 
Department of Labour, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



(name) 



(address) 



hereby makes appHcation for a licence to operate a 
barbering school under the name : 



at 



(address of school) 
Dated this day of 



19. 



(signature of apphcant) 



O. Reg. 247/69, Form 2. 



112 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 25 



REGULATION 25 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



BARBERS 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "barber" means a person who, 

(i) cuts or trims hair, 

(ii) tints, bleaches or dyes hair, 

(iii) shampoos hair and scalp, 

(iv) gives hair or scalp treatments or 
facial massages, 

(v) cleans or dresses artificial hair pieces, 

(vi) shapes, colours or treats eyebrows or 
eyelashes, 

(vii) curls or waves hair by any means, 



(viii) combs or brushes hair, 

(ix) shaves or trims beards or moustaches, 
or 

(x) performs any other operation with 
respect to dressing hair to obtain an 
intended effect or according to a par- 
ticular style, 

and who holds himself out to the public as a 
barber ; 

{b) "certified trade" means the trade of a 
barber. O. Reg. 248/69, s. 1. 

2. The trade of a barber is designated as a certified 
trade for the purposes of the Act. O. Reg. 248/69, 
s.2. 



3. No person shall carry on the certified trade in a 
shop that is represented to the pubUc as a hair- 
dressing shop. O. Reg. 248/69, s. 3. 

4. — (1) An apprentice training program for the 
certified trade is established and shall consist of, 

{a) training and instruction at full-time edu- 
cational day classes provided at a College of 
Applied Arts and Technology or in courses 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto, in the subjects con- 
tained in Schedule 1 ; and 



(b) practical training and instruction provided 
by an employer of the apprentice in the sub- 
jects contained in Schedule 2. 

(2) An apprentice shall complete three periods of 
training and instruction of 1500 hours per period. 
O. Reg. 248/69, s. 4. 

5. — (1) A graduate student of a barber school to 
which Regulation 24 of Revised Regulations of 
Ontario, 1970 appHes shall be issued an interim 
certificate of qualification in the certified trade upon 
successfully passing an examination prescribed by 
the Director in the subjects contained in schedules 
1 and 2. 

(2) An interim certificate of qualification is vaHd 
for a period of twenty-four months from the date on 
which it is issued, but the certificate may be renewed 
for such period of time as the Director determines 
upon the holder passing an examination prescribed 
by the Director. 

(3) An application for an interim certificate of 
qualification or a renewal thereof shall be made in 
Form 5 of Regulation 33 of Revised Regulations of 
Ontario, 1970 and shall be accompanied by a fee of 

$5. 

(4) The holder of an interim certificate of quali- 
fication may apply for a certificate of qualification 
that may be issued without examination, if he satis- 
fies the Director that he has been employed full-time 
in the certified trade for a period of not less than 
twelve months. 

(5) No holder of an interim certificate of qualifi- 
cation shall be employed in the certified trade unless 
at least one holder of a certificate of qualification is 
employed by the same employer and under whose 
supervision the holder of an interim certificate of 
qualification works. 

(6) The ratio of holders of interim certificates of 
qualification to the ratio of holders of certificates of 
qualification, employed by the same employer, shall 
not exceed three to one. O. Reg. 248/69, s. 5. 

6. No person shall become an apprentice in the 
certified trade unless he has successfully completed 
Grade 9 in Ontario or has such other academic quaU- 
fication that, in the opinion of the Director, is 
equivalent thereto. O. Reg. 248/69, s. 6. 

7. Any person who, 

(a) applies in the prescribed form for appren- 
ticeship in the certified trade ; and 



Reg. 25 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



113 



{b) becomes an apprentice in the certified trade 
within three months after commencing to 
work in that trade, 

is exempt from subsection 2 of section 10 of the Act. 
O. Reg. 248/69, s. 7. 

8. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the 
certified trade whether for his regular daily hours or 
for hours in excess of his daily hours shall not be less 
than, 

{a) 50 per cent during the first period of training 
and instruction ; 

{b) 70 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; and 



(c) 90 per cent during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction, 

of the average rate of wages or its equivalent for 
journeymen employed by the employer in the certi- 
fied trade or, where the employer is the only journey- 
man employed, of the average rate of wages or its 
equivalent for journeymen in the area. O. Reg. 
248/69, s. 8. 

9. The subjects of examination for a certificate of 
qualification are the subjects contained in Schedules 
1 and 2. O. Reg. 248/69, s. 9. 

10. A certificate of qualification in the certified 
trade expires on the 30th day of April in each year. 
O. Reg. 248/69, s. 10. 



Schedule 1 

BARBER 

In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


' 


Language and 
Communication 


Composition 
Business Writing 


Vocabulary of the trade. Grammar, sentence and 
paragraph structure. Written and oral composition. 

Sample business letters; format tone and layout. 
Report writing. 


2 


Mathematics 
(Trade Related) 


Arithmetic 

Business 
Mathematics 


Addition, subtraction, multiplication, division. Frac- 
tions, decimals, percentage, interest and discount. 

Fundamental operations. Basic bookkeeping, bal- 
ance sheets, financial statements. Retaihng insur- 
ance, taxes, Ucensing, leases. 


3 


Chemistry 


Basics 
Cosmetics 


Organic and inorganic chemistry. Matter. Physical 
and chemical changes. Elements, compounds, mix- 
tures. Properties. Analysis. Synthesis. Acids, 
bases (alkalis) and salts. pH factor. Chemistry of 
water ; purification, hard and soft water. 

Barbering trade pharmaceutical products. Charac- 
teristics and application. Physical and chemical 
classification of powders, solutions, emulsions, oint- 
ments, soaps. 



114 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATIOlS 



Reg. 25 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Fundamentals of 
Barbering 



Safety 



Barbering History 



Bacteriology 



Sterilization and 

Sanitizing 



Personal Hygiene 



Barber Shop 
Hygiene 



Barber Chair 



Combs 



Safety rules and regulations. Safe operating pro- 
cedures. First aid. Fire prevention. Use and main- 
tenance of fire fighting equipment. Handling and 
storage of flammable, poisonous or caustic materials. 
Use of rubber gloves and protective creams for 
handHng chemicals, tints and bleaches. Safe opera- 
tion of electrical equipment. Eye protection for 
light therapy. Care and handhng of cutting tools. 
Good housekeeping. 

Superstitions. Origin. Body beautification. Beard 
significance. Greek, Roman and English influence. 
Barber-surgeons. Modern trends. 

Classification and description of bacteria. Non- 
pathogenic and pathogenic organisms. Bacterial 
growth and reproduction^ movement, body infection 
methods, contagion sources. Other infectious agents ; 
viruses, parasites, fungi. Carriers. Control and 
destruction of bacteria. 

Importance. Physical agents; use of boiling or 
steaming, dry heat, ultra- voilet rays. Chemical 
sanitizing agents; antiseptics, disinfectants, vapours 
(fumigants). Requirements. Applications. Solu- 
tion types; mixing and usage. Storage of sterilized 
or sanitized tools and implements. 

Importance of good health. Balanced diet and 
exercise. Healthy mental outlook, Confidence. 
Good posture. Combatting fatigue. Personal clean- 
liness, habits. Appearance; uniform, shoes, speech. 
Physical examinations. 

Apphcable government health regulations. Infec- 
tious diseases; customer and barber requirements. 
Shop interior cleanliness; waste storage and removal. 
Lighting, heating, plumbing and ventilation require- 
ments. Water requirements. Rest rooms. Shop 
usage. Correct towel, usage and storage. Sanitizing 
and storage of tools and implements after use. Ap- 
pHcation and storage of lotions, ointments, creams, 
powders ; use of spatulas and sterile cotton. Elimina- 
tion of rodents, flies and insects. Restrictions on 
pets. 

Characteristics; components, hydraulic action, cor- 
rect usage. Height and position adjustments, locking 
position. Children's auxiliary chair. 

Types and characteristics; materials, sizes. Appli- 
cations and correct usage. Hair-cutting, wide tooth, 
handle and all purpose combs. Care and sanitizing 
procedures. 



Reg. 25 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



115 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Brushes 


Types and characteristics; materials, bristles, tex- 
ture. Hair brushes, neck dusters, lather brushes. 
Correct usage. Sterilization and sanitizing require- 
ments. 






Lather 
Equipment 


Types and characteristics ; shaving mugs and lather- 
izers. Care and usage. Sanitizing requirements. 






Comedone 
Extractors and 
Tweezers 


Types, characteristics. Correct usage. Sterilizing 
and sanitizing procedures. 






Electric Hair 
Vacuums and Dryers 


Types and characteristics. Care and usage. Sani- 
tizing requirements. 






Shears 


Types and characteristics. Hair-cutting and thinning 
shears. Application, sizes, grinds, and serrations. 
Care and usage. Sharpening techniques. Correct 
holding methods, tension, finger and wrist move- 
ment. Co-ordination. Sanitizing procedures. 






Clippers 


Types and characteristics; component parts. Hand 
and electric (vibrator and motor types). Hand 
clipper cleaning, cutter blade changing, adjustment 
and lubrication. Electric cUpper cleaning and lubri- 
cation. Detachable and non-detachable cutting 
heads. Clipper blade sizes. Correct cUpper handling 
and manipulative procedures. Sanitizing require- 
ments. 






Razors 


Types and characteristics; straight razor parts, 
balance, temper, grjnd, size, style and finish. De- 
tachable blade straight razors. Correct care and 
razor manipulation. Usage precautions. Sanitizing 
and storage procedures. 






Hones 


Types and characteristics: natural and synthetic. 
Water, Belgium, Swaty, carborundum hones. Wet 
and dry honing. Holding the razor; direction, 
stroking, pressure, bevel. Overhoning and back- 
honing. Finished edge requirements and testing 
technique. Safety precautions. Hone care. 






Strops 


Types and characteristics; canvas, leather, Russian, 
horsehide; Russian shell. Bfeaking-in procedures. 
Correct stropping techniques. Razor direction, 
angle, stroking, pressure. Stropped edge require- 
ments and testing technique. Safety precautions. 
Strop care and use of dressings. 


5 


Basic Anatomy 
and Physiology 


Cells 


Structure, cell growth, reproduction, metabolism, 
tissues. 






Digestive System 


The stomach ; digestion process, enzyme action. 



116 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 25 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Tttt m 










Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Circulatory System 


Circulatory (vascular) system ; description and func- 
tion of blood — vascular and lymphatic systems. 
Arteries and vi'ins of the head, face and neck. The 
endocrine system. 






Bone Structure 
(head, face and neck) 


Bone composition. Types. Nutrition. Cranial, 
facial, hyoid and cervical bones. Numbers and 
function. 






Muscular System 


Muscle tissue; voluntary, involuntary and cardiac. 
Muscle origin, insertion, belly and characteristics. 
Stimulation methods. Muscles of the head, face and 
neck. 






Nervous System 


Nerves and nerve cells, nerve types. Division of the 
nervous system. Nerve reflex. Nerve fatigue; 
stimulation methods. Nerves of the head, face and 
neck. 






Excretory System 


Sudoriferous (sweat) glands and sebaceous (oil) 
glands. 






Skin and 
Appendages 


Skin health and appearance. Skin thickness. Epi- 
dermis and dermis. Subcutaneous tissue. Skin 
nourishment. Nerves of the skin. Skin elasticity, 
colour. 






Hair 


Composition; hair root and hair shaft. Hair root 
structure, follicles, distribution, growth, replace- 
ment, life and density, colour, greying. Hair anal- 
ysis; texture, porosity, condition and elasticity. 






Hair, Scalp and 
Skin Disorders 


Definitions and terminology ; recognition of infection 
and contagious skin disorders. Primary and secon- 
dary lesions. Dandruff, skin inflammations, alo- 
pecia. Contagious disorders; ringworm, scabies. 
Non-contagious skin disorders. 






High Frequency 
Treatments 


Basic electricity. Conductors, insulators, circuits. 
Alternating and direct current. Converters and 
rectifiers. Fuses. Safety precautions. High fre- 
quency current application for facial and scalp 
treatment ; Tesla current (violet ray) ; Physiological 
effects. Facial and scalp electrodes. Application 
procedures and safety precautions; direct surface 
application and indirect apphcation. Treatment 
duration. 






Light Therapy 


Characteristics and properties of ultra-violet, infra- 
red and visible light rays. Therapeutic lamp types; 
beneficial effects. Precautions in use; danger of 
burns — distance from patron — exposure duration 
— use of safety goggles and eye pads. 



Reg. 25 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



117 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Massage 


Physiological effects and benefits of facial and scalp 
massage. Basic manipulations; effleurage (stroking), 
petrissage (kneading), friction (deep rubbing), per- 
cussion (tapping, hacking, slapping), vibration. 
Correct use and application of electrical appliances; 
vibrators, high-frequency applicators, therapeutic 
lamps. Electrical equipment usage precautions. 


6 


Barbershop 
Practice 

Shaving 


Shaving 
Fundamentals 

Shaving Positions 
and Strokes 

Preliminaries 

Customer Shaving 

Mustache and 
Beard Trimming 


Coverage. Shape of face. Hair texture. Type and 
grain of beard. Skin sensitivity to razor, lather, 
hot towels, astringent lotions. Beard infections; 
recognition and required action. Standing positions. 

The four standard strokes; free hand, back hand, 
reverse free hand, reverse back hand positions and 
strokes. Holding the razor; positions of hands, 
stroking the razor. When and where to use specific 
strokes. The fourteen shaving areas. 

Customer hair cloth and chair adjustments. Sani- 
tizing hands. Placing towel. Lather application. 
Preparation and application of steam towel. Re- 
lathering. Razor preparation. 

Conventional shave techniques; second time over. 
The "once-over" shave; strokes and advantages. 
Close shaving; strokes and disadvantages. Points 
to remember. Removal of ingrown hairs. Acciden- 
tal cuts ; use of styptic powders. Completion of shave 
and final steps; use of creams, lotions, towels, drying, 
powdering, etc. Possible points of customer criti- 
cism. 

Types and styles. Outhning and shaping. Finishing 
procedures. 


7 


Barbershop 
Practice 

Facial 
Treatments 


Preliminaries and 
Customer Preparation 

Customer Facials 


Analysis of customer's skin condition. Determina- 
tion of facial type and equipment required. Arrange- 
ment of supplies. Linen and towel adjustment. 
Customer hair protection and chair angle adjust- 
ment. Washing hands. 

Procedures and techniques for plain, vibratory, dry 
skin, oily skin and acne facials. Clay packs and hot 
oil masks ; commercial face packs and masks. Muscle 
toning. Massage movements and manipulations. 
Correct vibrator use and techniques. Use and appli- 
cation of steam towels, creams, lotions, oils, solu- 
tions, astringents, tonics, powders. Blackhead 
removal. Use of dermal lights, infra-red lamps and 
high frequency (Tesla) current. Customer eye pro- 
tection. Clean-up procedures. Used towels and 
waste disposal. Container sealing and storage. 
Sanitizing implements and hands. Possible points of 
customer criticism. 



118 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 25 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


8 


Barbershop 
Practice 

Haircuts 


Haircutting 
Fundamentals 

Customer 
Preparation 

Customer 
Haircutting 


Basic haircuts; hair trims (close, medium, heavy). 
Short and semi-short cuts (short pomp, flat top, crew 
cut. butch, etc.). Modern trends (current styles). 
Care and handUng of tools and implements. Sani- 
tizing requirements. Correct chair heights, proper 
stance. 

Proper seating. Correct use of neck strips, hair 
cloths and cHps, paper and linen towels. Analysis of 
hair type and condition. Hairhne. Head and face 
contour. Choice of style, tools and procedures. 

Cutting areas. Edging, siding, topping, blending. 
Chpper technique; tapering, hand positions, correct 
blade usage. Use of hand cHppers. Shear and comb 
technique; hand positions, manipulation. Shear 
point tapering. Arching technique, outUning, squar- 
ing off side-burns. Hair thinning techniques for 
regular or thinning (serrated) shears. Finishing; 
finger and shear technique. Procedures for side and 
centre part of pompadour. Shaving neck and 
outhned areas; preparation. Lather application. 
Razor stroking. Finishing ; cleaning, drying, powder- 
ing. Final check-up; trimming ear and nose hair 
and eyebrows. Singeing technique. Possible points 
of customer criticism. 


9 


Barbershop 
Practice 

Shampoos 


Fundamentals 

PreHminaries 

Customer 
Shampooing 


Importance of clean and healthy hair and scalp con- 
ditions. Shampoo types, characteristics and appli- 
cation; plain, liquid cream, liquid dry, castile and 
olive oil, hot oil, egg, tincture of green soap, medi- 
cated, non-strip, special shampoos. 

Types and characteristics of rinses: water, acid, 
dandruff and blueing types. 

Analyzing customer hair and scalp condition. Suit- 
able shampoo selection. Arrangements of towels, 
supplies, selection of equipment. Customer prepara- 
tion for inclined or reclined position shampoos. 

Procedures and techniques for all shampoo types. 
Shampoo application. Scalp massage and manipula- 
tions. Rinsing procedures — Use of correct rinse. 
Drying and finishing. Possible points of customer 
criticism. 


10 


Barbershop 
Practice 


Fundamentals 


Benefits of scalp massage. Scalp massage procedures : 
The six positions and massage movements; muscles, 
nerves and arteries affected. Separate treatment or 
combined with other treatments. 



Reg. 25 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



119 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 




Scalp and Hair 
Treatments 


Scalp Treatments 


Treatments and procedures for: normal scalp and 
hair, dry scalp, oily scalp, dandruff, alopecia. Cor- 
rective hair treatments. Scalp steam. Type and 
apphcation of shampoos, scalp ointments and creams, 
vegetable oils, astringents, hair tonics. Use and 
apphcation of vibrators, red dermal lights, infra-red 
lamps, ultra-violet rays, high frequency (Tesla) 
current. Safety precautions; eye protection, use of 
alcohol base hair tonics. Sterilization and sanitizing 
requirements. 


11 


Barbershop 
Management 
and Professional 
Ethics 


Operations 
Conduct 


Business organization. Types of ownership. Loca- 
tion selection. Shop equipment. Advertising meth- 
ods and mediums. Salesmanship. Business law — 
financial operations. Government regulations ap- 
plicable to barber shops, barbers, and apprentices. 

Ethical conduct; proper conduct and business deal- 
ings in relation to employer, customers and co- 
workers. Punctuality. Avoidance of unethical 
practices. 



O. Reg. 248/69, Sched. 



Schedule 2 

BARBER 

Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


Fundamentals 
of Barbering 
(as detailed in 
Schedule 1) 


Safety 
Bacteriology 


Safety rules and regulations. Safe operating pro- 
cedures. First aid treatment. Fire prevention. 
Handling and storage of flammable, poisonous or 
caustic materials. Dermatitis prevention. Safe 
operation of electrical equipment. Care and hand- 
ling of cutting implements. Good housekeeping. 

Recognition and classification of bacteriological in- 
fections. Familiarization with body infection 
methods and contagion sources, control and destruc- 
tion of bacteria. 



120 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 25 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Personal Hygiene 

Barber Shop 
Hygiene 

Barbershop 
Equipment, 
Implements and 
Accessories 


Importance of good health. Mental outlook. Pos- 
ture. Confidence. Personal cleanhness. Appear- 
ance. Familiarization with physical examination 
requirements. 

Familiarization with apphcable government health 
regulations. Infectious diseases; customer and 
barber requirements. Shop interior cleanhness; 
waste storage and removal. Lighting, heating, 
plumbing and ventilation requirements. Water 
requirements. Rest rooms. Shop usage. Towel 
usage and storage. Sterilization and sanitizing 
methods and agents. Sterihzation or sanitizing of 
implements and accessories and storage after use. 
AppHcation and storage of lotions, ointments, creams 
and powders. 

Familiarization with types, characteristics, care and 
correct usage of: barber chairs, lather equipment, 
razors, shears, clippers (hand and electric), combs, 
brushes, comedone extractors and tweezers, electric 
hair dryers and vacuums, hones and strops. 


2 


Basic Anatomy 
and Physiology 


Body Systems 

Head, Scalp and 
Skin Disorders 

High Frequency 
Treatments 

Light Therapy 

Manage 


FamiUarization with characteristics and function of 
body cells — digestive, excretory, circulatory, mus- 
cular and nervous systems — bone structures — 
skin and appendages — hair, in relation to the head, 
face and neck. 

Recognition of infection, contagious and non-con- 
tagious disorders. Familiarization with required 
action or remedial treatment, personal and public 
health safeguards. 

High frequency (Tesla) current applications for 
facial and scalp treatment by direct surface or in- 
direct methods. Familiarization with safety pre- 
cautions and protective measures. 

Use of ultra-violet, infra-red rays and dermal lamps. 
" Familiarization with safety precautions and protec- 
tive measures. 

FamiUarization with basic manipulations and effects. 
Use and application of electric vibrators, high fre- 
quency applicators and therapeutic lamps. 


3 


Barbershop 
Practice 

Shaving 


Preliminaries and 

Customer 

Preparation 

Customer Shaving 


Recognition of beard grain, infections and required 
action. Skiri sensitivity. Customer hair cloth and 
chair adjustments. Sanitizing hands. Placing towel. 
Lather application. Preparation and application of 
steam towel. Relathering. Razor preparation. 

Conventional shaves; second time over. "Once 
over" shaves. Close shaving. Removal of ingrown 



Reg. 25 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



121 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Mustache and 
Beard Trimming 


hairs. Accidental cut treatment. Completion of 

>havc and final steps; use of creams, lotions, towels; 
drying, powdering. Finishing service. 

FamiHarization with types and styles. Outlining. 
Shaping. Finishing. 


4 


Barbershop 
Practice 

Facial 
Treatments 


PreHminaries and 

Customer 

Preparation 

Customer Facials 


Analyzing customer's skin condition; determination 
of facial type and equipment required. Arrange- 
ment of suppHes, linen and towels. Customer hair 
protection and chair angle adjustment. Sanitizing 
hands. 

Giving facials for plain, vibratory, dry skin, oily skin 
and acne. Use of clay packs and hot oil masks ; com- 
mercial face packs and masks. Muscle toning. 
Massage and manipulations. Vibrator use. Black- 
head removal. Use of therapeutic lamps and high 
frequency (Tesla) current. Safety precautions. 

Clean up procedures. Sanitizing implements and 
hands after facials. 


5 


Barbershop 
Practice 

Haircuts 


PreHminaries and 

Customer 

Preparation 

Customer 
Haircutting 


Hair cloth and chair adjustment. Analyzing cus- 
tomer's hair type and condition ; hairHne, head and 
face contour. Choice of style, implements and pro- 
cedures. Sanitizing hands. 

Giving hair trims, short and semi-short cuts, current 
styles. Edging, siding, topping, blending. Use of 
hand and electric clippers. Tapering. Shear and 
comb techniques. Shear point tapering. Arching, 
outHning, squaring oH sideburns. Hair thinning. 
Finishing; finger and shears technique, shaving neck 
and outlined areas. Cleaning, drying, powdering. 
Final check-up; trimming ear and nose hair and 
eyebrows and singeing (if requested). 


6 

7 


Barbershop 
Practice 

Shampoos 


PreHminaries and 

Customer 

Preparation 

Customer 
Shampooing 


Analyzing customer's hair and scalp condition. 
Suitable shampoo selection. Arrangement of towels, 
supplies, selection of equipment. Customer prepara- 
tion for inclined or reclined position shampoos. 

Giving plain, Hquid cream, liquid dry, castile and 
oHve oil, hot oil, egg, tincture of green soap, medi- 
cated, non-strip and special shampoos. Shampoo 
application. Scalp massage and manipulations. 
Rinsing. Use of correct rinse. Drying and finishing. 


Barbershop 
Practice 

Scalp and Hair 
Treatments 


Customer Scalp 
Treatments 


Recognition of scalp diseases; famiharization with 
required action by customer and barber. Giving 
treatments for normal scalp and hair, dry scalp, oil\ 
scalp, dandruff, alopecia. Corrective hair treat- 
ments. Scalp steam. Application of shampoos, 
scalp ointments and creams, vegetable oils, astrin- 



122 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 25 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 








gents, hair tonics. Scalp massage. Application of 
vibrators, dermal lights, infra-red lamps, ultra- 
violet rays, high frequency (Tesla) current. Safety 
precautions. Sterilization and sanitizing pro- 
cedures after treatments. 


8 


Barbershop 
Management 


Respoiisibilities 
Conduct 


Familiarization with applicable government regu- 
lations and local by-laws. Safe and hygienic shop 
operation. Salesmanship. HandHng routine corre- 
spondence. Financial operations; local scales of 
charges, overheads. Bookkeeping, financial state- 
ments. Purchasing supphes and equipment. 

Ethical conduct. Developing personality, tolerance, 
understanding and respect. Maintaining shop har- 
mony. Punctuality. 



a Reg. 248/69, Sched. 2. 



Reg. 26 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



123 



REGULATION 26 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



BRICK AND STONE MASONS 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "brick and stone mason" means a person 
who, 

(i) constructs and erects walls, arches, 
fire places, chimneys, smoke-stacks 
and other items that are comprised 
of brick and stone masonry com- 
ponents, and 

(ii) lays fire-brick and other refractory 
materials in walls and arches in the 
construction of furnaces, in lining 
furnaces and retorts, or in enclosing 
boilers, tanks and heat treating 
furnaces ; 

(6) "certified trade" means the trade of brick 
and stone mason. O. Reg. 529/70, s. 1. 

2. The trade of brick and stone mason is desig- 
nated as a certified trade for the purposes of the Act. 
O. Reg. 529/70, s. 2. 

3. No person shall become an apprentice in the 
trade unless he has successfully completed Grade 8 
or has such other academic qualification that, in the 
opinion of the Director, is equivalent thereto. 
O. Reg. 529/70, s. 3. 

4. An apprentice training program for the certified 
trade is estabhshed and shall consist of, 

(a) training and instruction at full-time edu- 
cational day classes provided at a College 
of Applied Arts and Technology or in 
courses that, in the opinion of the Director, 
are equivalent thereto, in the subjects con- 
tained in Schedule 1 ; and 

{b) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by the employer of the apprentice in 
the subjects contained in Schedule 2. 
O. Reg. 529/70, s. 4. 



5. An apprentice shall complete four periods of 
training and instruction of 1600 hours per period. 
O. Reg. 529/70, s. 5. 

6. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
in the certified trade are the subjects contained in 
Schedules 1 and 2. O. Reg. 529/70, s. 6. 

7. Notwithstanding subsection 2 of section 8 of 
Regulation 33 of Revised Regulations of Ontario, 
1970, every hour worked by an apprentice in excess 
of his regular daily hours of practical training and 
instruction shall be included in computing the hours 
spent in training and instruction. O. Reg. 529/70, 
S.7. 



8. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the certified trade shall not 
exceed, 



{a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
trade, one apprentice plus an additional 
apprentice for every five journeymen em- 
ployed by that employer in the trade and 
with whom the apprentice is working ; and 

{b) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the trade, one apprentice for the first jour- 
neyman employed by the employer plus an 
additional apprentice for each additional 
five journeymen employed by that em- 
ployer in the trade and with whom the 
apprentice is working. O. Reg. 529/70, 
S.8. 

9. Sections 8 and 9 and subsections 2, 3 and 4 of 
section 10 of the Act do not apply to any person who 
works or is employed in the certified trade. O. Reg. 
529/70, s. 9. 



10. A certificate of qualification in the certified 
trade is not required to be renewed. O. Reg. 529/70, 
s. 10. 



124 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 26 



Schedule 1 

BRICK AND STONE MASON 
In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Academic 

Subjects 


General 

Trade Terminology 


Architectural drafting, mathematics, English, build- 
ing science as related to the masonry craft. 

Inter-relationships of trade vocabularies. 


2 


General 

Trade 

Practice 


Safety 
Tools 
Mortar 
Materials 

Bonds 

Gauging 
and Joints 


Safety practices in the erection and use of scaffolds, 
ladders, hoisting and other such equipment. The Con- 
struction Safety Act. 

Identification, care and safe practices in the use 
of hand and power tools and equipment as related 
to the trade. 

Identification and use of sand, cementitious materials, 
adhesives, sealants and plasticizers. Colouring, water- 
proofing and other such additives. Mixing techniques. 

Origin, manufacture, identification and use of struc- 
tural tile, brick, refractories, concrete block, manu- 
factured and natural stone, and related insulating 
materials. 

Principles, uses, and types of masonry bonding. 

Layout and use of gauge-rods, modular and non- 
modular measuring devices. Types of joints. 


3 


Walls 


Planning and 
Construction 


Organization, lay-out, and building of various types of 
walls, corners, chimneys, fireplaces, arches, piers and 
reinforced masonry. 


4 


Walls and 
Materials 


Cleaning and 
Protection 


Absorption, porosity, capillarity of unit masonry. 
Natural salts and compounds. Hydrochloric acid 
and caustic soda treatments. Protective coverings. 


5 


Modular 
Co-ordination 


Identification and 
Terminology 


History of the subject. Need for co-ordination. De- 
tails, grids, and units. 


6 


Quantity 
Take-off 


Calculations 


Method of calculating exact amount of modular and 
non-modular materials, various joint thicknesses and 
mortar types. 



O. Reg. 529/70, Sched. 



Reg. 26 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



125 



Schedule 2 

BRICK AND STONE MASON 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


General Trade 
Practice 


Safety 

Tools 
Mortar 

Materials 

Bonds 

Gauging and 
Joints 


Safety practices in the erection and use of scaffolds, 
ladders, hoisting and other such equipment. The 
Construction Safety Act. 

Trade terminology: inter-relationships of trade 
vocabularies. 

Identification, use and care of hand and power tools 
and equipment as related to the trade and safety 
practices pertainmg to same. 

Identification and use of sand, cementitious materials, 
adhesives, sealants, and plasticizers. Colouring, 
water-proofing and other such additives. Handling 
and mixing techniques. 

Identification, use and handling of structural tile, 
brick, refractories, concrete block, manufactured and 
natural stone, and related insulating materials. 

On site application of masonry principles and the 
uses of various types of masonry bonds. 

Layout and use of gauge-rods, modular and non- 
modular measuring devices. Types of joints. 


2 


Walls 


Construction 


Organization, lay-out and building of various types 
of walls, corners, chimneys, fireplaces, arches, piers 
and reinforced masonry. 


3 


Walls and 
Materials 


Cleaning and 
Protection 


Absorption, porosity and capillarity of unit masonry. 
Natural salts and compounds. Hydrochloric acid and 
caustic soda treatments. Protective coverings. 


4 


Modular 
Co-ordination 


Application 


On site application. Terminology. Details, grids, and 
units. 


5 


Quantity 
Take-off 


Practical 
Calculations 


Method of calculating exact amount of modular and 
non-modular materials, various joint thicknesses and 
mortar types. 



O. Reg. 529/70, Sched. 2. 



126 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 27 



REGULATION 27 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



CARPENTERS 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "carpenter" means a person who does the 
woodwork in the erection, alteration or 
repair of structures, including, 

(i) the building and erecting of forms 
for concrete, 

(ii) the erecting of scaffolds, runways, 
and hoisting towers, 

(iii) the erecting of partitions, 

(iv) the placing of door frames and 
window frames, 

(v) the placing of joists, nailing-strips 
and sleepers, 

(vi) the laying of floors, 

(vii) the preparing of walls and ceilings 
for plastering, 

(viii) the making and placing of door 
jambs, 

(ix) the fitting and fixing of architraves 
and mouldings, 

(x) the cleaning and sanding for in- 
terior finish, 

(xi) the checking of all work with plumb- 
level and square and ensuring proper 
alignment, 

(xii) the making, placing and erecting of 
interior fixtures, kitchen cupboards 
and bathroom cupboards, 

(xiii) the preparing and erecting of panels, 

(xiv) the laying out and erecting of stairs 
and hand rails, 

(xv) the fitting and placing of hardware 
on doors, door jambs and windows, 

(xvi) the fitting of doors, windows and 
fixtures and the placing of hinges 
thereon, 

(xvii) the weatherproofing of outside walls, 
and 

(xviii) the shingling of roofs, 

but does not include a lather or cabinet- 
maker ; 

(6) "trade" means the trade of a carpenter. 
O.Reg. 270/64, s.l. 



2. An apprentice training program in the trade 
is established and shall consist of four periods of 
training and instruction of 1800 hours each, 

{a) at full-time educational day classes pro- 
vided at a College of Applied Arts and 
Technology in the courses contained in 
Schedule 1 ; and 

(b) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by an employer of the apprentice 
in the courses contained in Schedule 2. 
O. Reg. 270/64, s. 2. 

3. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the 
trade whether for his regular daily hours or for hours 
in excess of his regular daily hours shall be not less 
than, 

{a) 40 per cent during the first period of training 

and instruction; 

(b) 50 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; 

(c) 60 per cent during the third period of 
training and instruction ; and 

{d) 80 per cent during the fourth period of 
training and instruction, 

of the rate of wages or its equivalent for a journey- 
man employed by the same employer in the trade 
and with whom the apprentice is working. O. 
Reg. 270/64, s. 3. 

4. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
are the subjects set out in column 1 of Schedules 1 
and 2. O. Reg. 270/64, s. 4. 

5. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the trade shall not exceed, 

{a) where the employer is a journeyman in 
the trade, one apprentice plus an additional 
apprentice for each five journeyman em- 
ployed by the employer in the trade and 
with whom the apprentice is working ; and 

{b) where the employer is not a journeyman 
in the trade, one apprentice for the first 
journeyman employed by the employer 
plus an additional apprentice for each 
additional five journeymen employed by 
the employer in the trade and with whom 
the apprentice is working. O. Reg. 270/64, 
S.5. 



Reg. 27 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



127 



Schedule 1 
CARPENTER 

In School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Subject Matter 


Instruction In 


Skills For Apprentices 


1 


Tools 


Safety precautions, and care when 
using tools. Using the proper tool. 
Classification of tools : 

(a) edge tools, cutting tools; 

(b) marking tools, measuring tools 
and layout tools ; 

(c) assembly tools ; and 
{d) accessory tools. 

Capabihties and Hmitations of tools. 

Methods of grinding and whetting 

tools. 

Saw sharpening. 


Angles to grind on edges for different 
tools. 


2 


Use of tools 


(1) True up wood to size; face marks 
and edge marks. Use of plane gauge, 
winding batterns, square, rule, and 
pencil. 

(2) Squaring ends of wood; explana- 
tion of the cutting action and the 
proper angle for cutting with a cross- 
cut saw. 

Use of try-square. 

(3) Use of rip saw. 


Use of face and edge marks. Type of 
plane to use. Proper angle at which to 
hold and use saws.^ 


3 


Joints; framing 
and making 


Half-lap joint. Centre-lap joint. Half- 
lap dovetailed joint. Open dovetailed 
joint. Through-mortice joint and 
through-tenon joint. Blind-mortice 
joint and blind-tenon joint. Bareface- 
tenon joint. Mitre joint. Dowel joint. 
Where these joints are used in carpen- 
try. 


How to lay out joints. How to make 
these joints. How to make a tool box. 


4 


Other joints 


Square-edge joints. Dowel joints. Rab- 
bet joint or ship-lap joint. Plough-and- 
feather joint. Where these joints are 
used in carpentry. 


How to make these joints. 


5 


Wall 
construction 


Lay-out and position of studs. Marking 
out with steel square. 





128 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 27 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Subject Matter 


Instruction In 


Skills For Apprentices 


6 


Cutting and 
erecting 


Methods of cutting: 

(a) a correct length ; and 

(b) squaring. 

Nailing, erection, and bracing. 


How to make a cutting-box. Where to 
place nails. Method of raising. Placing 
studs on corners for lath. 


7 


Lumber 


Classification. Growth. Defects. Sizes. 


Kinds and sizes of lumber for different 
uses. 


8 


Steel square 


Explanation of various markings on 
a steel square. How bevel cuts are ob- 
tained by use of a steel square. Use of 
steel square to determine the length 
and bevel cuts of rafters. Use of steel 
square for marking mitres, obtaining 
brace lengths, and squaring areas. 




9 


Subjects related 
to carpentry 


Blueprint reading. Mathematics. 
Enghsh. 




10 


Other topics 


Fitting and hanging basement sash. 
Double tenon with haunch. Scarf- 
joints and the different types thereof. 
Making fish-plates. Making sash and 
assembling ; using lay-out rod ; clamps ; 
wedging; gluing; cleaning. How to 
mitre the risers of veranda stairs. Lay- 
out, cutting and erection of veranda 
stairs. 


Where a double tenon with haunch is 
used. Length of bevel of a scarf-joint. 

How to lay out and erect stairs. 


11 


Cutting and 
erecting 


Placing headers over door openings 
and window openings. Cutting and 
erecting sheeting, siding, corner- 
boards and bevel-ends. 


Relative strengths of various sized 
headers and materials. Diagonal or 
horizontal placing of nails. Levelling 
around structure for the siding. 


12 


Laying out and 
makingarches 


Laying out, cutting and erecting 
arches. 


Laying out various arches. 


13 


Making carpm- 
ters' saw-horses 


Lay-out by steel square, and then cut 
and assemble. 


Use of steel square. 


14 


Related subjects 


Blueprint reading. Mathematics. 
English. 




15 


Stairs, newel- 
posts and 
handrail 


The lay-out, building and erection of 
stairs, newel-posts and handrails. 


How to lay out, build and erect stairs, 
newel-posts and handrails. 



Reg. 27 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



129 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Subject Matter 


Instruction In 


Skills For Apprentices 


16 


Inside 
partitions 


Cutting and erecting plates and studs. 
Framing door openings. Girts. Spac- 
ing. Bridging. Temporary braces. 
Diagonal bracing. Strapping walls. 
Plugging brick walls. 


Dimensions for openings. Lay out 
inside partitions from plane. Methods 
of doubhng studs. Knowledge of 
centres, naihng methods, and making 
plugs. How to use a plugging tool. 


17 


Roughing-in 

frame 

construction 


(1) Cutting, placing, levelling, and 
bedding of sills. Marking and boring 
sills for bolts. 

(2) Making and setting wood girders. 

(3) Cutting and setting joists. Keep- 
ing up the crowned edge of joists. 
Where and why fire-cuts are made. 
Spacing and naihng joists. Cutting 
and placing trimmers, doublers, and 
bridging. Setting stirrups and anchors. 

(4) Studding. Cutting, erecting, and 
spacing studding. Methods of con- 
structing corners. Top plates and 
bottom plates. Preparation for open- 
ings. 

(5) Nailing rough horizontal, and diag- 
onal sheeting. 

(6) Erecting scaffolds for various 
loads. Scaffold materials; sills, legs, 
headers, ledgers, scabs, horizontal and 
diagonal bracing, and planking.. Safety 
measures in erecting scaffolds. 

(7) Cutting, setting and sheeting roof 
rafters. 

(8) Shinghng. Types of shingles. Cut- 
ting for valleys. Cutting for hips. 
Correct naihng and size of nails. Caps 
for ridge and hips. Flashing for valleys. 
Gutter material. Correct lapping and 
spacing of shingles. 


QuaHty and quantity of materials. 
Formula for squaring corners. Know- 
ledge of external finishes. Method of 
laying out joists. Where to double- 
joist. Laying out trimmers. 

Correct size of nails and the spacing 
thereof. Where to place bracing. 
Method of diagonal bracing. Position 
of headers to obtain maximum strengh. 

Relative strength of horizontal and 
diagonal sheeting. Correct size of nails, 
and the spacing thereof. When to place 
scabs under ledgers. Safe materials for 
planking. 

Lay out of rafters by use of steel-square. 
Method of raising rafters. Length and 
type of nails used in shinghng. Where 
to place nails. Placing and use of toe- 
boards. 


18 


Construction 


Boring the bottom of wood columns to 
insert dowels. Cutting, sizing, and set- 
ting corbeils. Cutting, squaring, hoist- 
ing, setting, and bolting of beams. 
Types of flooring: loose-tongue, 
tongued and grooved, and laminated. 
Reason for spacing the joints of 
flooring. 


Cutting, sizing and setting corbeils. 
Materials for corbeils. 

Where to place nails. 


19 


Exterior finish 


Setting window frames. Setting door 
frames. Use of storey-rod. Placing and 
cutting tongued and grooved siding. 
Placing and cutting bevel siding. 
Placing and cutting asbestos .siding. 
Placing and cutting corner-boards. 





130 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 27 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Subject Matter 


Instruction In 


Skills For Apprentices 






Placing, cutting and mitring corners. 
Window trim and door trim; placing 
paper over rough sheeting and under 
door trim and window trim. Cutting 
and placing of barge-boards; soffits, 
faciae, bed-moulds, dentil blocks, and 
flashings. Fitting and placing hard- 
ware. 


Knowing different types of paper. 
Use of mitre box. 
Types of nails. 

Where to place flashings. 


20 


Interior trim 


(1) Preparing, erecting and fixing of 
trim; proper methods of setting door 
jambs. 

(2) Cutting and setting base blocks 
and casings; preparing and placing 
heads ; coping of stiles to heads ; cutting 
and scribing back bands; nailing. 

(3) Trimming windows: preparing, 
cuttmg and scribing of stools. Nailinj.; ; 
preparing and cutting of aprons, 
back bands and casings. 

(4) Laying base boards: cutting, 
fitting, mitring. Coping, and scribing 
to floor. Joints used in laying base 
boards: butt, tongue, and coped. 

(5) Preparing, cutting and placing 
picture rails and wood cornices. 

(6) Cutting, nailing, mitring and cop- 
ing of mouldings. 

(7) Fitting doors to jambs, heads, and 
floors; hanging of doors and placing 
hinges. 

(8) Fitting window sashes : casement ; 
double hung. Cords, weights and 
spring balances on double hung window 
sashes. 


Knowledge and method of nailing all 
interior trim. Setting door jambs. 

Method of obtaining bevel cuts. 

Use of mitre box in laying base boards. 

How to place mouldings in a mitre 
box. 

Necessary allowance for cutting mould- 
ings. Knowledge of how and when to 
bevel edges of doors. Setting a butt- 
gauge. Spacing of door hinges. Know- 
ledge of how to compute the required 
length of cords. Tying cord to weights ; 
fastening cord to sash; fastening 
spring balances to frame and sash. 



O. Reg. 270/64, Sched. 1 



Reg. 27 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



131 



t 



Schedule 2 

CARPENTER 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Subject Matter 



Instruction In 



Skills For Apprentices 



Tools 



Safety precautions, and care when 
using tools. Using the proper tool. 
Classification of tools : 

(a) edge tools, cutting tools; 

(b) marking tools, measuring tools 
and layout tools ; 

(c) assembly tools ; and 

(d) accessory tools. 
Capabilities and limitations of tools. 
Method of grinding and whetting tools. 
Saw sharpening. 



Angles to grind on edges for different 
tools. 



Use of tools 



(1) True up wood to size; face marks 
a^jd edge marks. Use of plane gauge, 
winding batterns, square, rule and 
pencil. 

(2) Squaring ends of wood; explana- 
tion of the cutting action and the 
proper angle for cutting with a cross- 
cut saw. Use of try-square. 

(3) Use of rip saw. 



Use of face marks and edge marks. 
Type of plane to use. Proper angle 
at which to hold and use saws. 



Wall 
construction 



Lay-out and position of studs. 
Marking out with steel square. 



Cutting and 
erecting 



Methods of cutting : 

{a) a correct length ; and 
{b) squaring. 

Nailing, erection, and bracing 



How to make a cutting-box. Where to 
place nails. Method of raising. Placing 
studs on corners for lath. 



Lumber 



Classification. Growth. Defects. Sizes. 



Kinds and sizes of lumber for different 
uses. 



Steel 



square 



Explanation of various markings on a 
steel square. How bevel cuts are ob- 
tained by use of a steel square. Use of 
steel square to determine the length 
and bevel cuts of rafters. Use of steel 
square for marking mitres, obtaining 
brace lengths, and squaring areas. 



132 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 27 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Subject Matter 


Instruction In 


Skills For Apprentices 


7 


Subjects related 
to carpentry. 


Blueprint reading. 




8 


Other topics 


Fitting and hanging basement sash. 
Double tenon with haunch. Scarf- 
joints and the different types thereof. 
Making fish-plates. How to mitre the 
risers of veranda stairs. Lay out, 
cutting and erection of veranda stairs. 


How to lay out and erect stairs. 


9 


Cutting and 
erecting 


Placing headers over door openings 
and window openings. Cutting and 
erecting sheeting, siding, corner-boards 
and bevel-ends. 


Relative strengths of various sized 
headers and materials. Diagonal or 
horizontal placing of nails. LeveUing 
around structure for the siding. 


10 


Laying out and 
making arches. 


Laying out, cutting and erecting 
arches. 


Laying out various arches. 


■■ 


Making carpen- 
ters' saw-horses. 


Lay-out by steel square, and then cut 
and assemble. 


Use of steel square. 


12 


Stairs, newel- 
posts and 
handrail 


The lay-out, building and erection of 
stairs, newel-posts and handrails. 


How to lay out, build and erect stairs, 
newel-posts and handrails. 


13 


Inside 
partitions 


Cutting and erecting plates and studs. 
Framing door openings. Girts. Spac- 
ing. Bridging. Temporary braces. 
Diagonal bracing. Strapping walls. 
Plugging brick walls. 


Dimensions for openings. Lay out 
inside partitions from plane. Methods 
of doubling studs. Knowledge of 
centres, naihng methods, and making 
plugs. How to use a plugging tool. 


14 


Roughing-in 

frame 

construction 


(1) Cutting, placing, leveHing, and 
bedding of sills. Marking and boring 
sills for bolts. 

(2) Making and setting wood girders. 

(3) Cutting and setting joists. Keep- 
ing up the crowned edge of joists. 
Where and why fire-cuts are made. 
Spacing and nailing joists. Cutting 
and placing trimmers, doublers, and 
bridging. Setting stirrups and anchors. 

(4) Studding. Cutting, erecting, and 
spacing studding. Methods of con- 
structing corners. Top plates and 
bottom plates. Preparation for open- 
ings. 


Quality and quantity of materials. 
Formula for squaring corners. Know- 
ledge of external finishes. Method of 
laying out joists. Where to double- 
joist. Laying out trimmers. 

Correct size of nails and the spacing 
thereof. Where to place bracing. 
Position of headers to obtain maximum 
strength. Method of diagonal bracing. 



Reg. 27 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



133 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Subject Matter 


Instruction In 


Skills For Apprentices 






(5) Nailing rough horizontal, and diag- 
onal sheeting. 

(6) Erecting scaffolds for various 
loads. Scaffold materials; sills, legs, 
headers, ledgers, scabs, horizontal and 
diagonal bracing, and planking. Safety 
measures in erecting scaffolds. 

(7) Cutting, setting and sheeting roof 
rafters. 

(8) Shingling. Types of shingles. Cut- 
ting for valleys. Cutting for hips. 
Correct nailing and size of nails. Caps 
for ridge and hips. Flashing for valleys. 
Gutter material. Correct lapping and 
spacing of shingles. 


Relative strength of horizontal and 
diagonal sheeting. Correct size of nails 
and the spacing thereof. When to place 
scabs under ledgers. Safe materials for 
planking. 

Lay out of rafters by use of steel square. 
Method of raising rafters. Length and 
type of nails used in shingling. Where 
to place nails. Placing and use of toe- 
boards. 


15 


Construction 


Boring the bottom of wood columns to 
insert dowels. Cutting, sizing, and set- 
ting corbeils. Cutting, squaring, hoist- 
ing, setting, and bolting of beams. 
Types of flooring: loose-tongue, ton- 
gued and grooved, and laminated. 
Reason for spacing the joints of flooring. 


Cutting, sizing and setting corbeils. 
Materials for corbeils. 

Where to place nails. 


16 


Exterior finish 


Setting window frames. Setting door 
frames. Use of storey-rod. Placing 
and cutting tongued and grooved sid- 
ing. Placing and cutting bevel siding. 
Placing and cutting asbestos siding. 
Placing and cutting corner-boards. 
Placing, cutting, and mitring corners. 
Window trim and door trim; placing 
paper over rough sheeting and under 
door trim and window trim. Cutting 
and placing of barge-boards: soffits, 
faciae, bedmoulds, dentil blocks, and 
flashings. Fitting and placmg hard- 
ware. 


Knowing different types of paper. 
Use of mitre box. 
Types of nails. 

Where to place flashings. 


17 


Interior trim 


(1) Preparing, erecting and fixing of 
trim; proper methods of setting door 
jambs. 

(2) Cutting and setting base blocks 
and casings; preparing and placing 
heads ; coping of stiles to heads ; cutting 
and scribing back bands ; nailing. 

(3) Trimming windows: preparing, 
cutting and scribing of stools. Nailing ; 
preparing and cutting of aprons ; back 
bands and casings. 

(4) Laying base boards: cutting, fit- 
ting, mitring. Coping, and scribing to 
floor. Joints used in laying base 
boards : butt, tongue, and coped. 

(5) Preparing, cutting and placing 
picture rails and wood cornices. 


Knowledge and method of naihng all 
interior trim. Setting door jambs. 

Method of obtaining bevel cuts. 

Use of mitre box in laying base boards. 
How to place mouldings in a mitre box. 



134 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 27 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Subject Matter 


Instruction In 


Skills For Apprentices 






(6) Cutting, nailing, mitring and cop- 
in of mouldings. 

(7) Fitting doors to jambs, heads, and 
floors; hanging of doors and placing 
hinges. 

(8) Fitting window sashes : casement ; 
double hung. Cords, weights and 
spring balances on double hung window 
sashes. 


Necessary allowance for cutting mould- 
ings. Knowledge of how and when to 
bevel edges of doors. Setting a butt- 
gauge. Spacing of door hinges. Know- 
ledge of how to compute the required 
length of cords. Tying cord to weights ; 
fastening cord to sash ; fastening spring- 
balances to frame and sash. 



O. Reg. 270/64, Sched. 2. 



Reg. 28 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



135 



REGULATION 28 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



CEMENT MASONS 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "cement mason" means a person who, 

(i) does concrete finishing by hand or 
with mechanical equipment, includ- 
ing the appUcation of curing and 
surface treatments, 

(ii) does all phases of waterproofing 
and restoration of concrete, 

(iii) does rubbing-up and repairing of 
hardened concrete surfaces, 

(iv) places and finishes epoxy, plastic 
and other composition materials, 
and 

(v) finishes and exposes aggregate in 
precast and architectural concrete. 

{b) "certified trade" means the trade of cement 
mason. O. Reg. 199/67, s. 1. 

2. The trade of cement mason is designated as a 
certified trade for the purpose of the Act. O. Reg. 
199/67, s. 2. 

3. No person shall become an apprentice in the 
certified trade unless he has Grade 8 standing or, in 
the opinion of the Director, has equivalent academic 
qualifications . O . Reg . 1 99/67 , s . 3 . 

4.— (1) An apprentice training program is estab- 
lished for the certified trade and shall consist of three 
periods of training and instruction of 2000 hours each, 

(a) at full-time educational day classes pro- 
vided at a College of Applied Arts and 
Technology in the subjects contained in 
Schedule 1 ; and 

{b) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by the employers of the apprentice in 
the occupational skills contained in Sche- 
dule 2. 

(2) The total hours of related training and work 
experience shall be assigned as shown in Schedule 1 
and Schedule 2. O. Reg. 199/67, s. 4, revised. 

5. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the 
certified trade whether for his regular daily hours or 
hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall be 
not less than, 



(a) 60 per cent for the first period of training 
and instruction ; 

(b) 75 per cent for the second period of 
training and instruction ; and 

(c) 90 per cent for the third period of training 
and instruction, 

of the rate of wages or its equivalent for a journey- 
man employed by the same employer in the trade 
and with whom the apprentice is working. O. Reg. 
199/67, s. 5. 



6. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the trade shall not 
exceed, 

{a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
trade, one apprentice plus one additional 
apprentice for every four journeymen em- 
ployed by the employer in the trade and with 
whom the apprentice is working ; and 

{b) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the trade, one apprentice for the first 
journeyman employed by the employer plus 
one additional apprentice for each additional 
four journeymen employed by the employer 
in the trade and with whom the apprentice 
is working. O. Reg. 199/67, s. 6. 

7. — (1) Notwithstanding subsection 2 of section 8 
of Regulation 33 of Revised Regulations of Ontario, 
1970, every hour worked by an apprentice in 
excess of his regular daily hours of practical train- 
ing and instruction shall be included in computing 
the hours spent in training and instruction. 

(2) A progress record book shall be issued by the 
Department of Labour to each apprentice for the 
purpose of recording work experience and related 
training time and the apprentice shall be responsible 
for the safe-keeping of this progress record book. 
O. Reg. 199/67, s. 7. 



8. A contract of apprenticeship shall be entered 
into by every apprentice with the local apprenticeship 
committee for the trade estabhshed under the Act in 
the area in which his apprenticeship originates and the 
apprentice shall be responsible for preparing the 
reports of his work experience and instruction as 
prescribed in his progress record book for submission 
to the local apprenticeship committee. O. Reg. 
199/67, s. 8. 



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9. The local apprenticeship committee shall be 
responsible for periodic review of the progress of each 
apprentice and for ensuring that the apprentice ob- 
tains the range of work experience and related train- 
ing as prescribed in this Regulation. O. Reg. 
199/67, s. 9. 

10. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
in the certified trade are the subjects set out in 
column 1 of schedules 1 and 2. O. Reg. 199/67, s. 10. 



11. Any person who is engaged in the certified 
trade is exempt from subsections 2 and 4 of section 
10 of the Act. O. Reg. 199/67, s. 1 1 . 



12. A holder of a certificate of qualification in the 
certified trade of cement mason is exempt from the 
provisions of sections 21 and 22 of Regulation 33 of 
Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1970. O. Reg 
199/67, s. 12. 



Schedule 1 

CEMENT MASONS 
In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instruction to be Given 


■ 


Mathematics 


Total Hours 636 

Arithmetical processes; linos, angles, areas, volumes, frac- 
tions, decimals, ratio, proportion, weights and measures, 
solution ot formulae, equations and problems related to 
cement masonry work. 


2 


Science 


Physical and chemical properties and characteristics of 
materials, coarse and fine aggregates, cements, plastics, 
admixtures, mastics, surface hardeners and treatments, joint 
fillers, waterproofings ; fundamentals of quality concrete; samp- 
ling, testing and evaluation of test results. 


3 


Drafting 


Blueprint reading, sketching and fundamentals of architectural 
drawings. 


4 


Trade Theory 


Layout and concrete construction, slab on grade and suspended ; 
walls, roofs, bases, stairs, pavements, sidewalks, curbs, gutters, 
tanks, waterproofing, pointing and caulking, uses of composition 
materials and decorative applications. Shotcreting methods, 
pressure grouting methods. Characteristics, care and use of trade 
tools and equipment. 


5 


Industrial Economics 


As related to the preparation, application, repair and main- 
tenance; estimating from construction drawings and specifi- 
cations ; job organization and supervision. 


6 


Safety and Building Codes 


The Construction Safety A ci 

Building codes relevant to the trade, safe practices. 



O. Reg. 199/67, Sched. 1. 



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137 



Schedule 2 

CEMENT MASONS 
Work Instruction and Experience 





Column 1 


Column 2 




Occupational Skills 


Instruction to be Given 


1 


Concrete Finishing 


Total Hours 1750 




Job Layout and Planning 


Checking granular base. 

Checking formwork. 

Checking or setting of formwork, screeds, bulkheads. 

Checking location of steel reinforcing and mesh. 

Checking location of fastening devices. 

Preparation of concrete base to receive mono or separate 

toppings. 

Checking levels, heating facilities and temporary lighting. 

Ordering materials. 




Mixing, Placing, Curing and 


Evaluating mix specifications. 




Protecting 


Mixing concrete. Placing concrete. 

Mixing and application of coloured hardeners. 

Mixing and application of -metallic and non-metallic surface 

hardeners. 

Apphcation of curing and sealing compounds. 

Placing and finishing concrete base. 

Sampling and testing of concrete for quahty control. 




Finishing Concrete 


Hand finishing using straight edge, darby, hand float, hand 
trowel. Edging and jointing. Power floating. Power trowelling. 
Power screeding. Power chipping and grinding. Sand blasting. 
Acid etching. Exposed aggregate finishing. Texturing and pat- 
terning exposed concrete with various form lining materials. 
Broom, burlap and belt finishing using portable and mobile 
power grinder. Using portable and mobile saws for cutting 
concrete. Using scarifying machines. Using power operated 
routers. Making construction and expansion joints. Main- 
tenance of equipment. 




Safety Requirements 


The Construction Safety A ct 
Safe practices of the trade. 


2 


Waterproofing, Damp 
Proofing and Restoration 


Total Hours 1214 




Preparation 


Removal of wires, wall ties, bolts, and foreign material, 
lime, form oils from concrete walls and floors. Tracing 
sources of leakage. Preparation and apphcation of hot 
plugs. Temporary form work, screeds and scaffolding. 
Removal of toppings and mortars on floors, walls or other 
surfaces and scarifying to receive new materials. Removal 
and reinstallation of bleed and drain system for water- 
proofing purposes. Preparation of walls, floors and other 
surfaces. Routing and raking of joints to receive grouting 
or pointing materials. Preparation of waterproofing materials. 



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Reg. 28 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Occupational Skills 


Instruction to be Given 




Application 

Safety Requirements 


Membrane materials. 

Metallic waterproofing. Topping materials. Asphalt and 

other bituminous coatings, hot or cold, including reinforcing 

membrane and protective surface coatings. Clear and opaque 

weatherproofing and water repellent material on concrete or 

masonry. Waterproofing and weatherproofing material by hand, 

pneumatic or mechanical means. 

Use of hot and cold joint sealants. 

Care and use of shotcreting methods and equipment. 

Care and use of pressure grouting methods and equipment. 

The Construction Safety- Act 
Safe practices of the trade. 


3 


Rubbing-Up 
Job Planning 

Installation of Scaffolding 

Field Practices 

Safety Requirements 


Total Hours 1350 

Examination of surfaces. 
Ordering and selection of materials. 

Hanging scaffolding. Sheave blocks and tackle. Barri- 
cades. Rigid scaffolding. 

Mixing of cement mortar. 

Preparation of surfaces to receive cement-base materials, 
including removal of form ties, nails and wires. 
Chipping, cleaning of foreign materials. Patching, pointing 
and caulking. Grinding. Brushing. Rubbing. Bush ham- 
mering. Power chipping and grinding. Sand blasting. Acid 
etching. Grouting and dry packing. Patching exposed aggregate 
surfaces. Curing and washing. Care and use of shotcreting 
methods and equipment. Care and use of pressure grouting 
methods and equipment. 

The Construction Safety A ct 
Safety practices of the trade. 


4 


Architectural Precast and 
Cast in Situ Concrete 

Preparation and Finishing 

Installation 

Safety Requirements 


Total Hours 350 

Selection of materials. Screeding and finishing. Broad- 
casting of decorative chips in exposed concrete. Application 
and stripping of surface retardants. Bush hammering. Acid 
etching. Repairing of damaged precast concrete components. 

Cleaning and trimming. Mixing grouting materials. Placing 
precast sections. Grouting. Pointing. Caulking. Cleaning. 

The Construction Safety A ct 
Safety practices of the trade. 


5 


Composition Materials 
Job Planning 


Total Hours 700 

Examination of surfaces. 
Ordering of materials. 
Establishing areas, lines and levels. 



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139 



I TFM 


Column J 


Column 2 


Occupational Skills 


Instruction to be Given 




Preparation 
Application 

Safety Requirements 


Masking and protection. Preparation of existing or new 
surfaces to receive materials. Heating of materials. Mixing 
hot asphalt. 

Screeding and trowelling. Hot asphalt. Cold mastic. Mag- 
nesium oxychloride flooring. Plastic flooring, polyester, epoxy, 
polyurethane and rubber based. Finishing of hot asphalt, cold 
mastic and composition materials. 

The Construction Safety A ci 
Safety practices of the trade. 



O. Reg. 199/67, Sched. 2. 



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Reg. 29 



REGULATION 29 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



CHEFS 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of chef ; 

(b) "chef" means a person who, 

(i) prepares, seasons and cooks, accord- 
ing to recipe, soups, meats, fish, 
poultry, vegetables and desserts, 

(ii) prepares salads and appropriate 
sauces and gravies for foods, 

(iii) selects and develops recipes and plans 
menus, 

(iv) has a working knowledge of meat 
cutting, baking, and pastry cooking 
and other culinary skills, 

(v) supervises, co-ordinates, and partici- 
pates in activities of cooks and other 
kitchen personnel engaged in prepar- 
ing and cooking foods in hotels, 
restaurants, cafeterias or other estab- 
lishments, and 

(vi) estimates food consumption, re- 
quisitions or purchases food-stuffs, 
and receives and checks food-stuffs 
and supplies for quality and quantity. 
O. Reg. 166/69, s. 1. 

2. The trade of chef is designated as a certified 
trade for the purposes of the Act. O. Reg. 166/69, 
S.2. 



3. — (1) An apprentice training program for the 
certified trade is established and shall consist of, 

(a) training and instruction at full-time edu- 
cational day classes provided at a College of 
Applied Arts and Technology or in courses 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto, in the subjects contained 
in Schedule 1 ; and 

{b) practical training and instruction provided 
by the employer of the apprentice in the 
subjects contained in Schedule 2. 

(2) An apprentice shall complete three periods of 
training and instruction of 2000 hours per period. 
O. Reg. 166/69, s. 3. 



4. — (1) A graduate of an approved course in cook- 
ing conducted at a College of Applied Arts and Tech- 
nology may be enrolled as an apprentice and upon 
enrolment shall complete two periods of training and 
instruction and may be excused from all or part of 
the training and instruction referred to in clause a 
of subsection 1 of section 3. 

(2) A person who has two or more years experience 
in the trade of cook may be enrolled as an apprentice 
and upon enrolment shall be granted such hourly 
credits and may be excused from all or part of the 
training and instruction referred to in clause a of 
subsection 1 of section 3, as the Director determines. 
O. Reg. 166/69, s. 4. 

5. The hourly rate of wages for an apprentice in 
the certified trade whether for his regular daily hours 
or for hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall 
not be less than, 

{«) SOpercentduringthefirst period of training 
and instruction; 

{b) 65 per cent during the second period of train- 
ing and instruction ; and 

(c) 80 per cent during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction, 
of the average hourly rate of wages for journeymen 
employed by the employer in that trade or, where the 
employer is the only journeyman, of the average 
hourly rate of wages for journeymen in the area. O. 
Reg. 166/69, s. 5. 

6. The subjects of examination for a certificate of 
qualification are the subjects contained in schedules 
1 and 2. O. Reg. 166/69, s. 6. 

7. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the certified trade shall 
not exceed, 

{a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
certified trade, one apprentice plus an addi- 
tional apprentice for every two journeymen 
employed by the employer in the certified 
trade and with whom the apprentice is 
working; and 

{b) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the certified trade, one apprentice for the 
first journeyman employed by the employer 
plus an additional apprentice for every 
additional two journeymen employed by the 
employer in the certified trade and with 
whom the apprentice is working. O. Reg. 
166/69, s. 7. 



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APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



141 



8. Sections 8 and 9 and subsections 2 and 4 of 
section 10 of the Act do not apply to any person who 
works or is employed in the certified trade. O. Reg. 
166/69, s. 8. 

Schedule 1 



9. A certificate of qualification in the certified 
trade is not required to be renewed. O. Reg. 
166/69, s. 9. 



CHEF 
In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 




Language and 
Communication 


Composition 
Business Writing 


Vocabulary of the trade. Grammar, sentence and 
paragraph structure. Oral composition. 

Sample business letters; format, tone and lay-out. 
Report writing. 


2. 


Mathematics 
(Trade Related) 


Arithmetic 

Business 
Mathematics 


Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. 
Fractions, decimals, percentage, interest, discounts. 
Ratio and proportion. Units of capacity and weight. 

Basic bookkeeping — purchase orders, requisitions, 
double entry cash book, ledger accounts. Profit and 
loss record. Balance sheets, financial statements, 
costing, retaihng, contracts and credit. Basic records 
of the catering trade. 


3 


General 
Kitchen 
Practices 


Safety 
Hand Tools 

Kitchen Utensils 

Power Tools and 
Equipment 


Safety rules and regulations. Accident prevention. 
First aid. Fire prevention. Use and maintenance of 
fire-fighting equipment. Safe use of cooking equip- 
ment. Safe operation of machinery and electrical 
equipment. Care and handhng of cutting tools. 
Good housekeeping. 

Types, care and use of knives, saws, cleavers ; sharp- 
ening and grinding techniques. Use and maintenance 
of chopping blocks and cutting boards. 

Types, care and use of peelers, scrapers, whips, 
spatulas, ladles, scoops, cutters, tongs, shears, kitchen 
forks, turners, palette knives, can openers, thermo- 
meters. Piping bags and tubes, rolUng pins, pastry 
boards and tables. 

Types, characteristics and correct usage; pots, pans, 
trays, bowls, grill toasters, skimmers, ladles, strainers, 
measures, colanders, coffee and tea making equip- 
ment. Heat conductivity. 

Types, safe operation and maintenance of power 
saws, slicers, grinding — peeling — chopping — 
mixing — blending — straining and tenderizing 
equipment. Dishwashing machines. Waste disposal 
units. 

Use of tool grinders; grinding wheels; types and 
grades, grinding cutting tools. 



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Reg. 29 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Item 








Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Kitchen Ranges 
and Ovens 


Types, sizes and capacity. Safe operation and main- 
tenance. Draught and temperature controls. Heat 
conservation. Starting and shutdown procedures. 






Steamer Kettles, 
Pressure Cookers 
and Tables 


Types and characteristics. Steamer operation, usage 
and pressure control. Food table utilization. Safety 
factors. Main steam valve operation (steam-heated 
bain-marie). Control switch and thermostat use 
(electric models). Shutdown procedures. Container 
and cover serviceability. 






Fryers 


Types, construction features, and capacities, safe 
operation and maintenance; thermostatic controls. 
Fat filters, strainers. Ventilation requirements. Fire 
prevention. 






Grills, Barbecues, 
Broilers, Griddles 
and Rotisseries 


Types, heating methods, safe operation and main- 
tenance. Salamander types and function. 






Refrigeration 
Equipment 


Types, characteristics and operation of refrigerators 
and deep freeze units. Ice cube machines. Tem- 
perature controls. Desirable food temperatures. 
Defrosting methods. Condensation problems and 
prevention. Use of food storage wrappings and con- 
tainers. Refrigerated food arrangement; air cir- 
culation requirements. 






Sanitation and 
Hygiene 


Importance of personal and kitchen hygiene. Public 
Health Regulations for Food Premises. Inspections. 
Bacterial food poisoning; conditions for growth, 
preventive measures. Use of cleaning agents, deter- 
gents and disinfectants. Pest and rodent control 
methods ; safe use of pesticides and fungicides. Waste 
disposal. 

Dishes, flatware and glasses; care and usage. Hand 
and machine dish-washing methods. Dishes; de- 
staining, condemning. Handling, stacking and 
storage procedures. 

Hands tools, utensils and equipment; construction 
metals and materials, effects of scraping and abra- 
sives, reaction to cleaning agents. Sanitary cleaning 
and sterilizing methods. Rinsing, drying, storage 
procedures. Mechanical cleaning of utensils. Clean- 
ing electrical equipment. Standard refrigeration 
sanitation techniques. 


4 


Theory of Food 


Nutrition 


Composition of foods. Nutrient values and reten- 
tion. Correct cooking methods, times, temperatures. 
Thermometer use. Food preservation methods and 
holding limits. Food preparation techniques. 
Canada Food Rules. 



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143 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 












Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Basic Cooking 
Methods 


Methods and procedures for dry and moist heat 
cooking and methods of application. Specialized 
cooking equipment: micro-wave, infra-red, high 
pressure steam. 






Culinary Basics, 
Stocks and Sauces 


Preparation of basic stocks and sauces; utilization. 
Structure of soups. 






Coffee Making 


Types of coffee. Ground coffee storage. Urn bags 
and filters. Water/coffee proportions. Temperature 
requirements. Batch frequency and urn cleaning. 
Brewing time. Coffee creams. Making coffee in 
bulk urns and silex and flask. 






Tea Production 


Requirements — water at boiling point. Tea/water 
proportions. Brewing time. Preparaing tea in bulk 
urns and teapots. 






Culinary Terminology 


French and English cuhnary and menu terminology. 






Butchery and 
Larderwork 


Theory of butchering. Wholesale cuts. Carcasses. 
Breaking methods. Identification of cuts and usages. 






Meats 


Government inspected meats. Hanging, storage, 
aging, freezing and thawing procedures. Meat 
colouration criteria and corrective action. Boning 
and trimming techniques. Use of bones, fat or suet. 
Use, preparation and storage of variety meats. 
Portion control. 






Poultry and Game 


Identification and uses. Purchasing methods. 
Dressed and eviscerated poultry. Freezing and 
thawing procedures. Frozen, iced or dry storage. 
Tendon removal, dressing, drawing, cleaning, stuff- 
ing and oven preparation, recognition of condition. 
Giblet removal and preparation. Poultry cutting 
methods. 






Fish 


Vertebrates; Fresh and salt water types. Charac- 
teristics. Purchasing methods. Fresh, dried, 
smoked, processed, frozen or iced fish. Correct 
storing procedures. Preparation; thawing, cleaning, 
filleting, scaling, skinning. Cutting steaks or fillets. 
Preparing whole fish. 






Shellfish 


Crustaceans and Mollusks ; types and characteristics. 
Availability. Purchasing and live storage methods. 
Raw storage. Cooking temperatures and fresh 
cooked storage. Shell opening or cracking and meat 
removal techniques. 






Salads 


Salad making teminology. Identification of salad 
fruits and vegetables. Seasonal variations. Selection 
methods. Skinning, sectioning, coring and peeling. 
Cutting, shredding, dicing, slicing and shaping tech- 
niques. Rinsing, cleaning and storing ingredients. 
Ice usage. 



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Reg. 29 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Ttttm 










Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Salad Dressings 
and Seasonings 


Types and variety of salad dressings and cold sauces. 
Preparation methods; use of seasonings, spi_ces^and 
condiments. Combining salad ingredients. Use of 
gelatin. Dish and service selection. Artistic display 
techniques. Preparation of aspics and mousses. 
Salad garnitures ; types and methods of use. Dressing 
usage. Decorating techniques. Storage of salads 
and dressings. 






Sandwiches 


Types; varieties, shapes and sizes. Importance of 
freshness. Bread varieties ; hand and machine slicing. 
Butters and additives; buttering technique. Prep- 
aration of fruit, vegetable, meat, fish or poultry 
fillings. Use of commercially packed fillings. Por- 
tioning. Sandwich dressing types. Sandwich 
wrapping and storage methods. Use of trays and 
platters ; display techniques. Garnishes. 

Types of hot sandwiches. Use of griddles, toasters 
and deep fryers. Special garnishes and sauces. 






Vegetable Cutting 


Potato types, quahty and selection. Storage meth- 
ods. Hand and machine peeling and scraping. 
Washing requirements. 

Root vegetable types. Cleaning, washing, peeling 
methods. Cutting methods. Use of shredders and 
slicers. Freshness retention. 

Green leaf vegetable types. Seasonal variations. 
Storing techniques and duration. Sorting techniques 
and cleaning. 

Preparation of fresh, frozen, dehydrated and pro- 
cessed vegetables, commercial pretreated and 
prepared ready-to-cook types. Preparation of stuffed 
vegetables. 






Vegetable Garnishes 


Uses; simple, combination and standard garnitures. 
Preparation methods ; cutting techniques. 






Cheese 


Types and characteristics: Canadian, English, 
French, Dutch, German, Italian, Scandinavian, Swiss. 
Smoked, potted, brandy and wine cured. Cottage 
and cream uncured cheeses. Pasteurized process 
cheese. Cheese spreads. Cheese use in desserts, 
snacks, salads, sandwiches, canapes and cooking. 






Baking and 
Dessert Theory 


Terminology. Weights and measure conversion 
tables. Liquid and volumetric measure: formulae 
ratios and proportions. Types of flour. Leavening 
agents, yeast, sugar, fats, milk and eggs and their 
uses in baking. Ingredient measuring, sifting, mixing 
and blending. Use of flavourings, spices and colour- 
ings. Preparation of batters and doughs. Use of 
convenience and efficiency ingredients. 



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145 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Baking 


Oven types; design factors. Time and temperature 
requirements for various baked goods. Calculation 
of yield. Mixing and baking methods for pies and 
tarts, yeast goods, and quick breads, pastes and 
doughs, hot or cold desserts, cakes and gateaux, 
cookies. Preparation of meringues, fruit and cream 
pie fillings, creams, dessert sauces, icings and frost- 
ings. Cake decorating techniques. Preparation of 
frozen and miscellaneous desserts. 


5 


Kitchen 
Management 


Organization 
and Layout 


Profitable business management. Right appraoch. 
Food service establishment type and location. 

Basic division of kitchen work. Adaptation of party 
system (kitchen brigade) to large, medium and small 
establishments. Job classifications and work speci- 
fications. Modern trends. Purchase and utilization 
of time-saving equipment. 

Kitchen layout; work and storage areas, work flow 
and traffic patterns. Public, management and staff 
relations. Work habits. 






Menu Planning 


Planning principles. Dietetics. Menu organization. 
Breakfast, luncheon, dinner and banquet menus. 
Buffet and smorgasbord. 

CycHcal menu systems. Standard recipes. Menu 
pricing, appearance and terminology. 






Food Purchasing 


Purchasing methods; seasonal, contract and tender. 
Volume buying. Grades and standards for meat, 
fish, vegetables, fruit, juices, poultry and eggs. 
Convenience foods; use of soups, sauces, fish and 
seafood, meat, poultry and game, vegetables, fruits, 
desserts, bakery products, beverages and dairy 
products. 






Receiving and 
Storage 


Receiving methods and control. Goods receipt. 
Invoice information verification. Type, location 
and protection of receiving area. Storage require- 
ments for meats, fish and seafoods, poultry, vege- 
tables and fruit, dairy products and dry goods. 
Stock rotation. Inventory control. 






Food Costing and 
Portion Control 


Costing of meat, fish, vegetables, fruit, juices, 
poultry, dairy products, miscellaneous food items 
and ingredients. Calculation of food cost percen- 
tages. Costing standard recipes, menus, banquets, 
buffets. Labour costs and overhead. Portion con- 
trol principles and methods. 






Buffet Planning 
and Layout 


Buffet equipment types and characteristics. Types 
of buffets. French. Smorgasbord. Presentation 
techniques; buffet arrangements, centre pieces. 



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Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Ttit** 










Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


6 


Kitchen 
Practice 


Stocks and Sauces 


Preparation of brown, white, fish stock, court 
bouillon and vegetable stocks. "Bouquet garni" 
making. Preparation of essences and glazes, Becha- 
mel, Veloute, Espagnole, tomato, Hollandaise and 
demi-glaze sauces. Gravies and au jus. Rouxs and 
other thickeners. Chaud-Froid sauces, butter and 
compound sauces. Use of wine and spirits in cooking 
and flambe dishes. Finishing and serving. 






Soups and 
Soup (iarnishes 


Preparation of consommes, cream, veloute, puree and 
pulse soups. Bisques and chowders. Potages (un- 
strained). Cold fruit and vegetable soups. Pasta 
and bread garnishes. Meat, poultry, seafood and 
miscellaneous garnishes. 






Main Dishes 
and Entrees 


Simmering, boiling and steaming meats. Stewing 
meats and poultry. Braising dark and light meats. 
Pot roasting. Garnishing entrees. Crouton usage. 
Chafing dish and casserole cookery. Preparation of 
meat pies and loaves, ground meat entrees. Left- 
over entrees (meat and poultry). Spiced and flav- 
oured foods. Pasta and rice cookery. 

Entree puddings. Use of wine, spice and herbs. 
Preparation of entree souffles and variety meat 
entrees. Heat retention and serving methods. 






Roasts and Bakes 


Oven temperature requirements. Searing and seal- 
ing. Basting and larding. Flavour improvement. 
Use of wines and marinades. Slow roasting. Test- 
ing for "Done-Ness". Roasting beef, pork, veal, 
lamb, poultry and game. Baking hams. Prepara- 
tion of stuffings, dressings, sauces and roast gravies. 
Roast garnishing. Presentation, carving and serving. 






Egg Cookery 


Preparing poached, fried, boiled and scrambled eggs. 
Hard-boiled egg utilization. Soft-boiled egg prepara- 
tions. Making rolled, folded and flat omelets. Pre- 
paring moulded and shirred eggs. Suitable garnishes 
and serving methods. 






Broiled Foods 


Use of open grills, barbecues and griddles. Standard 
practices. Steak cooking terminology. Meat and 
poultry preparation and seasoning. Cooking stage 
importance. Setting or searing. Basting and brush- 
ing. Turning and marking. Testing for "Done- 
Ness". Rotisserie use. 

Broiling of beef (steaks), lamb, ground meat, poultry, 
and ham. Preparation of accompanying sauces and 
garnishes. Dishing and serving. 

Salamander use — glazing and gratinating, toasting 
and grilling. Short order broiler work. Safety pro- 
cedures. Cooking durations. 



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147 



Column 1 



Item 



Course 



Column 2 



Subject 



Column 3 



Instruction To Be Given 



Sauteing and 
Pan Frying 



Deep Fat Frying 



Potato Cookery 



Vegetable Cookery 



Fish and Seafood 



Use of saute pans and skillets. Shortenings and oils. 
Accompanying sauces. Variety meats utilization. 
Cooking degree, times and temperatures. 

Sauteing and pan frying beef, veal and lamb, chicken, 
turkey and variety meats. Fish pan frying tech- 
niques. Preparing garnishes. 

Frying media. Temperature control. Correct food- 
stuff frying temperatures. Avoidance of under- 
heating. Reheating. Draining and refilling. Fat 
care; breakdown and burning prevention, straining 
and storage. 

Simple coating and breading. Preparing batters. 
Deep frying meats, poultry, croquettes, fritters and 
rissoles. 

Potato boiling and steaming. Cooking duration. 
Salting. Straining. Potato mashing and whipping. 
Testing for cooked state. Use of hand and mechani- 
cal mashers. Additional ingredients. Mixing and 
blending. 

Potato roasting and frying. Use of fats and shorten- 
ing. Cooking durations and temperatures. Fat and 
oven heat requirements. Home fries (saute) and 
Lyonnaise. Salting. Fat drainage. 

Preparing potato croquettes, cakes and pancakes. 
Special formulae. Baking whole potatoes. Use of 
dehydrated potatoes and potato flours. Potato use 
in soups and stews. 

Cooking root vegetables. Cooking green leaf vege- 
tables ; par-boiling and blanching, colour preservation, 
draining. 

Cooking marrows and squashes, peppers, celery and 
chards, corn, mushrooms, seed types and pulses, 
onions and stuffed vegetables. Accompanying sauces 
for vegetable cookery. Creaming and glazing vege- 
tables. Casserole and miscellaneous vegetable 
cookery. 

Cooking of garnishes; partial cooking, sweating and 
glazing. Use of binding and masking sauces, garlic, 
herbs and seasonings. Preparing vegetable cro- 
quettes and fritters. Frying batters and breading. 
Butter and cream finishing. Adding, dishing and 
serving garnishes. 

Fish poaching or boiling; preparing fish stocks, gar- 
nishes, butters, purees and seasonings. "Court 
buillon". Boiling whole fish for cold plates. Pound- 
weight cooking timing and temperatures. 



148 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 29 



Column 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Appetizers 



Butchery (Meats) 



Shallow fat frying — preparation ; use of egg and 
breaded coatings. Flour, milk and flour and batter 
coatings. 

Deep fat frying. Preparation; use of egg and 
breaded and batter coatings. Fat temperature and 
cooking duration. Fat drainage. Salting. Garnish 



Baking; whole fish and fillets. Preparing stuffings 
and garnishes. Utensil requirements. Cooking 
durations and temperatures. Basting. Baking in 
foil. Preparation of accompanying sauces. Present- 
ing and serving. 

Shellfish; Cooking duration and temperatures. Pre- 
cooking and storage. Removing meat from shell. 
Finishing; preparing garnishes, special butters, 
accompanying sauces. Presenting and serving. 

Making hors d'oeuvres and canapes. Types, shapes, 
sizes and bases. Hot and cold varieties. Preparing 
butters, creams, and dips. Use of marinades, sauces, 
wines, spices, seasonings and condiments. Use of 
fish and meat products and commercially prepared 
spreads. 

Making fruit and vegetable hors d'oeuvres. Suit- 
able fruits and vegetables. Seasonal availability. 
Preparing fresh, frozen or canned types. Garnishing 
and serving. 

Preparing fruit and vegetable cocktails. Preparation 
of suitable fruits and vegetables. Liquid and juice 
preparation. Preparing dressings. Garnishing and 
serving. 

Beef: "breaking" hinds. Removing, trimming, de- 
fatting flank. Removing and trimming long loin. 
Cutting up hip of beef. "Breaking" fronts. Remov- 
ing plate, brisket and fore shank. Removing short 
ribs and standing ribs. Cutting square cut chuck. 

Pork: "breaking" sides of pork. Removing leg. 
Removing and trimming loin or belly. Cutting up 
shoulder. 

Veal: "breaking" sides of veal. Removing leg. 
Removing loin and flank. Cutting up shoulder. 

Lamb: "breaking" carcass of lamb, removing legs. 
Removing loins and flanks. Cutting up shoulders. 

Cutting, trimming, boning available roasts, steaks, 
cuts, chops or pieces of meats as required. 



Reg. 29 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



149 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Butchery (Poultry) 



Butchery (Fish) 



Larder and 

Cold Preparations 



Cold Buffet 



Hot Buffet 



Pies and Tarts 



Yeast Goods and 
Quick Breads 



Preparation of miscellaneous items, variety meats, 
pork forcemeats, larding meats. 

Evisceration: removing head, pinions, tendons, feet 
and neck, "drawing", giblet removal. Recognition 
of diseased organs. 

Cutting poultry into halves, quarters and pieces. 
Poultry skinning. Removing breast fillets. Boning 
chickens and turkeys. Preparation for special uses. 

Cleansing poultry and oven preparation. Cleaning 
and preparing giblets. 

Cleaning whole round and fiat fish. Filleting and 
skinning. Cutting steaks and fillets. Boning whole 
fish for stuffing and baking. 

Preparing shellfish for cooking or raw usage. Shell 
opening, meat removal and cleaning. Cooked shell- 
fish ; shell cracking and meat removal. 

Preparing green side salads, molded salads, meat and 
pasta salads, main course salads, fruit salads. Pre- 
paring salad garnishes, mayonnaise dressings, French 
dressings and variations, boiled and fruit salad dress- 
ings. Dish selection, decorating display and serving 
of salads. 

Sandwiches: preparing types for various occasions. 
Preparing breads, butters and additives, fruit, vege- 
table, meat, poultry and fish filhngs and commercial 
food spreads. Preparing sandwich dressing. Pre- 
senting, garnishing and serving sandwiches. Wrap- 
ping and storing. Preparing hot sandwiches and 
accompanying garnishes and sauces. 

Buffet work; preparation and glazing of meat, fish, 
poultry and game centre pieces. Buffet salads, 
aspics, galantines, pressed meats, raised pies and 
pates. Design and decoration motifs. Decorating 
mediums. Platter, tray and dish selection. Buffet 
table arrangement. Cutting and carving. 

Casserole and chafing dish cookery; to include meats, 
poultry, fish, seafood, pasta, rice and vegetable 
accompaniments. 

Preparing pie pastries and fruit, custard and cream 
fillings. Making and baking fruit, cream, chiffon 
and soft pies, specialty pies, tarts and meringues. 
Preparing garnishes and pie decorating. 

Preparing yeast dough and sweet dough. Proofing. 
Punching, scaling and moulding. Preparing icings, 
toppings and fillings for sweet dough products. 
Making and baking bread and buns and various 
types, shapes and varieties of sweet breads and buns. 



150 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 29 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 




. 


Pastes and Doughs 

Hot and Cold 
Desserts 

Cakes and Gateaux 

Cookies 


Preparing quick bread doughs and batters. Making 
and baking various types of quick breads. Baking- 
off. Sufficient cooking indication. Turning and 
dumping. Hot or cooled serving. 

Preparing choux pastes, sweet tart pastes, puff and 
Danish pastes. Preparing creamed meat, fish, 
poultry, egg mixtures and salad fiUings. Fruit, 
cream, chocolate, almond paste and cheese filHngs. 
Frostings and glazings. 

Preparing fruit, cereal, gelatin, frozen, steamed 
desserts. Puddings and custards. Bavarians, 
Mousses and Souffles. Biscuit desserts. Garnishing 
desserts. Preparing vanilla, chocolate, sabayon and 
fruit dessert sauces. 

Preparing white, yellow and chocolate cakes. Pound 
and fruit cakes. Sponge and chiffon cakes. Petits 
fours. Tortes and gateaux. Preparing pastry and 
butter creams, icings and frostings. Cake decorating. 

Preparing soft and stiff cookie dough mixes. Adding 
fruits and nuts. Use of cookie press and cutters. 
Panning. Baking. Making dropped, spread, rolled, 
refrigerator (or sliced) and pressed cookies. Use of 
cooling racks. Decorating and storing. 



O. Reg. 166/69, Sched. 1. 



Schedule 2 

CHEF 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


General Kitchen 
Practices 
(as detailed in 
Schedule 1) 


Safety 

Hand and 
Power Tools, 
Utensils and General 
Kitchen Equipment 


Safety rules and regulations. Accident prevention. 
First aid. Fire prevention ; safe use of cooking equip- 
ment. Safe operation of machinery and electrical 
equipment. Care and handHng of cutting tools. 
Good housekeeping. 

Familiarization with types, characteristics, care and 
correct usage of hand and power tools, utensils, 
kitchen ranges and ovens, steamer kettles, pressure 
cookers and tables, fryers, grills, barbecues and 



Reg. 29 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



151 



Item 



Column 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Sanitation and 
Hygiene 



broilers, griddles and rotisseries. Coffee and tea 
making equipment. Refrigeration equipment. 
Dishes, flatware and glasses. 

Familiarization with personal and kitchen hygiene 
requirements. Pubhc Health Regulations for Food 
Premises. Inspections. Causes of bacterial food 
poisoning and prevention measures. Correct use of 
cleaning agents, detergents and disinfectants. Pest 
and rodent control ; safe use of pesticides and fungi- 
cides. Waste disposal. 

Familiarization with sanitary hand and machine 
cleaning methods for dishes; flatware and glasses. 
Destaining, condemnation, procedures. Handhng, 
stacking and storage. 

Famiharization with sanitary cleaning and sterihza- 
tion of hand tools, utensils, and equipment. Drying 
and storage. Safe cleaning of electrical equipment. 
Standard refrigeration sanitation procedures. 



Theory of Food 
(as detailed in 
Schedule 1) 



Nutrition, Cooking 
and Culinary Basics 



Butchery and 
Larder work 



Salads 

Salad Dressings 
and Seasonings 



Sandwiches 



Vegetable Selection 
and Preparation 



Familiarization with principles of nutrition. Canada 
Food Rules. Methods and procedures for dry and 
moist heat cooking and methods of application. 
Specialized cooking equipment ; micro-wave, infra- 
red, high pressure steam. 

Basic stocks and sauces; utilization. Soups struc- 
ture. Good coffee and tea making. Culinary ter- 
minology. 

Familiarization with theory of butchering meats, 
poultry and game, fish (vertebrates, crustaceans and 
mollusks). 

Salad making terminology, ingredients and methods. 

Salad dressings and cold sauces. Artistic display 
techniques. Aspics and mousses. Salad garnitures. 
Dressing usage. Decorating techniques. Salad and 
dressing storage. 

Sandiwiches: types and varieties and freshness. 
Breads ; slicing, buttering. Preparation of sandwich 
fillings and dressings. Use of commercially packed 
fillings. Wrapping and storage. Display techniques. 
Garnishes. Hot sandwiches; special garnishes and 
sauces. 

Requirements for potatoes, root vegetables and 
green leaf vegetables. Miscellaneous vegetables: 
marrows, squashes, celery, chards, corn, onions, seed 
types, pulses, peppers, mushrooms. Fresh, frozen, 
dehydrated, processed vegetables. Use of commer- 
cial pretreated and prepared ready-to-cook types. 
Preparation of stuffed vegetables. 



152 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 29 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Vegetable 
Garnishes 

Cheese 

Baking and 
Dessert Theory 


Simple, combination and standard garnitures. 
Preparation and cutting techniques. 

Familiarization with types, origin, characteristics. 
Cured and uncured cheeses. Smoked, potted, 
brandy and wine cured; pasteurized process cheese. 
Cheese spreads. Culinary uses of cheese. Cheese 
board set-up. 

Familiarization with baking terminology, principles 
and methods. Ingredient types and purpose ; meas- 
uring, sifting, mixing and blending. Flavouring, 
spicing and colouring. Preparation of batters and 
doughs. Use of convenience and efficiency ingredi- 
ents. 

Oven operation ; time and temperature requirements. 
Yield calculations. Mixing and baking methods for 
pies and tarts, yeast goods and quick bread pastes 
and doughs, hot and cold dessert, cakes and gateaux, 
cookies. Preparation of meringues, pie fillings and 
creams, dessert sauces, icings and frostings. . Cake 
decoration. Preparation of frozen and miscellaneous 
desserts. 


3 


Kitchen Practice 


Stocks and Sauces 

Soups and 
Garnishes 

Main Dishes 
and Entrees 

Roasts and Hakes 


Preparing brown, white, court bouillon and vege- 
table stocks. "Bouquet garni" making. Preparing 
essences and glazes. Bechamel, veloute, Espagnole, 
tomato, Hollandaise and demiglaze sauces. Gravies 
and Au Jus. Roux and other thickeners. Chaud- 
Froid sauces. Butter and compound sauces. Wine 
and spirit usage in cooking and flambe dishes. 
Finishing and serving. 

Preparing consommes, cream, veloute, puree and 
pulse soups. Bisques and chowders. Potages. 
Cold fruit and vegetable soups. Pasta and bread 
garnishes. Meat, poultry, seafood and miscellaneous 
garnishes. 

Simmering, boiling and steaming meats. Stewing 
meats and poultry. Braising light and dark meats. 
Pot roasting. Garnishing entrees. Crouton usage. 
Chafing dish and casserole cookery. Preparing meat 
pies and loaves and ground meat entrees. Left-over 
entrees. Spiced and flavoured foods. Pasta and 
rice cookery. Entree puddings. Entree souffles and 
variety meat entrees. Finishing and serving. 

Roasting beef, pork, veal, lamb, poultry and game. 
Baking hams. Use of wines and marinades. Slow 
roasting. Preparing stuffings, dressings, sauces and 
roast gravies. Roast garnishing, presentation, 
carving and serving. 



Reg. 29 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



153 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 












Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Egg Cookery 


Preparing poached, fried, boiled and scrambled eggs. 
Hard-boiled and soft-boiled egg utilization. Rolled, 
folded and flat omelets ; garnishes and fillings. Pre- 
paring moulded and shirred eggs. Suitable gar- 
nishes. Dishing and serving. 




. 


Broiled Foods 


Meat and poultry preparation and seasoning. Broil- 
ing of beef (steaks), lamb, ground meat, poultry, and 
ham. Rotisserie use. Salamander glazing and 
gratinating, toasting and grilling. Preparing accom- 
panying sauces and garnishes. Dishing and serving. 
Short order broiler work. 






Sauteing and 
Pan Frying 


Sauteing and pan frying beef, veal, lamb, chicken, 
turkey and variety meats. Fish pan frying. Pre- 
paring accompanying sauces ; garnishes. 






Deep Fat Frying 


Preparing batters, coatings and breading. Deep 
frying meats, poultry, croquettes, fritters and rissoles. 






Potato Cookery 


Boiling and steaming. Mashing and whipping. 
Mixing and blending additional ingredients. Roast- 
ing and frying. Home fries (saute) and Lyonnaise. 

Preparing potato croquettes, cakes and pancakes. 
Baking whole potatoes. Use of dehydrated potatoes 
and potato flours. 






Vegetable Cookery 


Cooking root vegetables. Cooking green leaf vege- 
tables. Cooking marrows and squashes, peppers, 
celery and chards, corn, mushrooms, seed types, 
pulses, onions, stuffed vegetables. Fresh, frozen, 
dehydrated and ready processed vegetables. 

Preparing accompanying sauces for vegetable cook- 
ery. Creaming and glazing vegetables. Casserole 
and miscellaneous cookery. Cooking of garnishes. 
Preparing vegetable croquettes and fritters. Butter 
and cream finishing. Dishing and serving. 






Fish and Seafood 
Cookery 


Poaching or boiling fish. Preparing fish stocks, 
garnishes, butters, purees, seasonings and court 
bouillon. Boiling whole fish for cold plates. 

Shallow fat frying. Preparing and using egg and 
breaded coatings, flour, milk and flour, and batter 
coatings. 

Deep fat frying. Preparing egg and breaded and 
batter coatings. Preparing garnishes. 

Baking whole fish and fillets. Preparing stuffings 
and garnishes. Baking in foil. Preparing accom- 
panying sauces. Presenting and serving. 



154 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 29 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Item 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Appetizers 



Butchery 

(Meats) 



Butchery 
(Poultry) 



Butchery 

(Fish and Seafoods) 



Larder and 

Cold Preparations 



Cold Buffet 



Hot Buffet 



Cooking shellfish. Precooking and storage. Remov- 
ing meat from shell. Raw meat usage. Finishing; 
preparing garnishes, special butters, accompanying 
sauces. Presenting and serving. 

Preparing fish and meat hors d'oeuvres and canapes. 
Hot and cold varieties. Use of commercially pre- 
pared spreads. Preparing butters, creams, cheeses 
and dips. Making hors d'oeuvres from fresh, frozen 
or canned fruits and vegetables. Preparing fruit 
and vegetables. Preparing fruit and vegetable cock- 
tails, liquids and juices, dressings. Presentation, 
garnishing and serving. 

Breaking beef hinds and fronts, sides of pork and 
veal, lamb carcasses. Cutting-up, trimming, de- 
fatting and boning available roasts, steaks, cuts 
chops or pieces, according to requirements and 
cooking methods. Preparing variety meats, pork 
forcemeats and larding meats. 

Cleaning and preparing poultry according to require- 
ments and cooking methods. Giblet cleaning and 
preparation. Poultry cutting and skinning. Remov- 
ing breast fillets. Boning chickens and turkeys. 

Cleaning whole round and flat fish. Filleting, scaling 
and skinning. Cutting steaks and fillets. Boning 
whole fish for stuffing and baking. 

Preparing shellfish for cooking or raw usage. Shell 
opening or cracking and meat removal. Cooked 
meat storage. 

Preparing green side salads, moulded, meat and 
pasta, main course and fruit salads. Preparing salad 
garnishes, mayonnaise and French dressing varia- 
tions, boiled and fruit salad dressings. Decorating, 
presenting and serving. 

Sandwiches; preparing for various occasions. Pre- 
paring breads, butters; fruit, vegetable, meat, poultry 
and fish fillings. Use of commercial food spreads. 
Preparing dressings; presenting, garnishing and 
serving sandwiches. Wrapping and storing. Pre- 
paring hot sandwiches, accompanying garnishes and 
sauces. 

Preparing, glazing centre pieces of meat, fish, poultry 
and game. Buffet salads, aspics, galantines, pressed 
meats, raised pies and pates. Selection of design and 
decoration motifs. Decorating. Table arrange- 
ments, cutting and carving. 

Casserole and chafing dish cookery including meat, 
poultry, fish, seafood, pasta, rice and vegetable 
accompaniments. 



Reg. 29 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



155 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Item 








Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Pies and Tarts 


Preparing pie pastries: fruit, custard and cream 
fillings. Making fruit, cream, chiffon and soft pies, 
specialty pies, tarts and meringues. Garnishing and 
decorating. 






Yeast Goods and 
Quick Breads 


Preparing yeast dough and sweet dough; icings, 
toppings and fillings for sweet dough products. 
Making bread and buns, sweet bread and bun 
varieties. 

Preparing quick bread doughs and batters; making 
various types of quick breads. Hot or cooled serving. 






Pastes and Doughs 


Preparing choux, sweet tart, puff and Danish pastes: 
creamed meat, fish, poultry and egg filling mixtures. 
Salad, fruit, cream, chocolate, almond paste, cheese 
fillings. Frostings and glazings. 






Hot and Cold 
Desserts 


Preparing fruit, cereal, gelatin, frozen, steamed 
desserts : puddings and custards. Bavarians, mousses 
and souffles. Biscuit desserts. Preparing garnishes; 
vanilla, chocolate, sabayon and fruit dessert sauces. 






Cakes and Gateaux 


Preparing white, yellow and chocolate cakes. Pound, 
fruit, sponge and chiffon cakes. Petits fours. Tortes 
and gateaux. Preparing pastrv and butter creams, 
icings and frostings. Cake decorating. 






Cookies 


Preparing soft and stiff cookie dough mixes. Making 
dropped, spread, rolled, refrigerator (or sliced) and 
pressed cookies. Decorating and storing. 


4 


Kitchen 
Management 


Organization 
and Layout 


F"amiliarization with basic division of kitchen work. 
Adaptation of party system (kitchen brigade) to 
establishment size. Job classifications and work 
specifications. Purchase and utilization of time- 
saving equipment. Planning kitchen layouts, work 
and storage areas. Importance of good public 
management — staff relations, work habits and 
kitchen harmony. 






Menu Planning 


Planning and organizing menus for breakfasts, 
luncheons, dinners and banquets. Buffets and 
smorgasbords. Cyclical menus. Standard recipes. 
Menu preparation and pricing. 






Food Purchasing 


Familiarization with foodstuff grades and standards; 
specification, purchasing procedures, convenience 
and efficiency foods. Food yield. Seasonal, con- 
tract and tender purchasing. Volume buying. 






Receiving and 
Storage 


Receiving goods. Verifying. Familiarization with 
receiving areas and handling requirements. Storage 
of meats, fish and seafoods, poultry, vegetables, fruit, 
dairy products, dry goods. Stock rotation and in- 
ventory control. 



156 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 29 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Food Costing and 
Portion Control 

Buffet Planning 
and Layout 


Costing foodstuffs and miscellaneous items. Cal- 
culating food cost percentages. Costing standard 
recipes, menus, banquets and buffets. Determina- 
tion of labour costs and overhead. Portion control. 

Familiarization with buffet equipment, types and 
characteristics. Planning, laying-out and presenting 
French buffets and smorgasbords. 



O. Reg. 166/69. Sched. 2. 



Reg. 30 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



157 



REGULATION 30 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



DRY CLEANERS 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of dry 
cleaner ; 

(6) "dry cleaner" means a person who under- 
stands and is capable of carrying out the 
process of, 

(i) cleaning garments in either manual 
or automatic equipment by immer- 
sion and agitation or by immer- 
sion only in volatile solvents, in- 
cluding but not being restricted to 
solvents of the petroleum distillate 
type, the coal tar distillate type, 
the chlorinated hydrocarbon type 
and including any or all of the pro- 
cesses incidental to cleaning gar- 
ments by immersion in volatile sol- 
vents, 

(ii) wet cleaning of garments by immer- 
sion in water or by the application, 
manually or by any mechanical de- 
vice, of water or any detergent and 
water, or by spraying or brushing 
the garments with water and any 
detergent or with water vapour or 
with chemicals and water or steam, 

(iii) pressing or finishing, or both, being 
the process of restoring garments to 
their original shape, dimensions or 
contour or to the condition in which 
the garments were received from the 
customer or as directed by the cus- 
tomer, and including the removal of 
wrinkles, stresses, bulges and impres- 
sions, imprint marks and shine from 
garments by the apphcation, either 
manually or mechanically and with 
or without dry or wet cleaning, of 
pressure, heat, moisture, water 
vapour or steam, 

(iv) removing spots or stains or locahzed 
areas of soil from garments before or 
after the garments are dry or wet 
cleaned or by manual or mechanical 
means, other than dry or wet 
cleaning, such as by brushing or 
spraying with water detergents and 
volatile or inflammable solvents or 
with chemicals or both. 



(v) repairing, being the process of 
making alterations as required by 
the customer to garments, such as 
by minor repairs and alterations, 
by reaffixing, replacing or restoring 
buttons and other fastening devices 
and decorative materials to the gar- 
ments either before or after one of 
the processes referred to in this 
clause, 

(vi) identification of fabrics, fabric con- 
struction, designs and finishes, 

(vii) cleaning shirts by immersion in 
water, including the use of washing 
formulae and chemicals, and of 
special finishes and a knowledge of 
the control of water and temperature, 
the operation of necessary equip- 
ment and the control of quality in 
the proper processing and finishing 
of shirt laundry, and 

(viii) basic management, production, 
quahty control, garment identifi- 
cation, pricing, packaging and ser- 
vicing to the customer. O. Reg. 
22/67, s.l. 

2. The trade of dry cleaner is designated as a 
certified trade for the purposes of the Act. O. Reg. 
22/67, s. 2. 

3. An apprentice training program is established 
for the certified trade and shall consist of four periods 
of training and instruction of 900 hours each, 

{a) at full-time educational day classes provided 
at a College of Applied Arts and Technology, 
or an equivalent course of training and 
instruction approved by the Director; and 

(6) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by an employer of the apprentice. 
O. Reg. 22/67, s. 3, revised. 

4. An apprentice who completes the four periods 
of training and instruction referred to in section 3 
is exempt from clause a of section 13 of the Act. 
O. Reg. 22/67, s. 4. 

5. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
are the subjects set out in column 1 of the Schedule. 
O. Reg. 22/67, s. 5. 

6. Any person who is engaged in the certified trade 
is exempt from subsections 2 and 4 of section 10 of 
the Act. O. Reg. 22/67, s. 6. 



158 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 30 



7. A holder of a certificate of qualification in the 
certified trade of dry cleaner is exempt from the 
provisions of sections 21 and 22 of Regulation 33 of 
Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1970. O. Reg. 22/67, 

S.7. 



8. The Act and this Regulation do not apply to 
persons employed in an industrial plant or institution 
established for a purpose other than carrying on the 
business of dry cleaning. O. Reg. 22/67, s. 8. 



Schedule 

DRY CLEANERS 
In School Training and Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject Matter 


Instruction to be Given 


1 


Dry Cleaning 


Synthetic and petroleum cleaning systems. Prespotting. Garment 
serviceability. 


2 


Finishing and 
Pressing 


Heavies. Silks. Furs. Household. Fabric construction and identification. 


3 


Spotting 


Spotting chemicals, formulae and techniques. Finishes. Furs. Dyes. 
Sizings. Fabric construction and identification. Garment serviceability. 
Wet cleaning. Dry cleaning operation. Prespotting. 


4 


Tailoring 


Install zippers. Half pockets. Alter buttons, hems. Lengthen and shorten 
garments. Other minor repairs and alterations. 


5 


Maintenance 


The maintenance and repair of equipment commonly used in dry cleaning 
plants. 


6 


Shirt Processing 


Formulae. Finishes. 


7 


Sales and Production 
Management 


Sales. Delivery. Identification of garments. Cash control. Store routine. 
Pricing. Packaging. Applied public relations. Production. Quality con- 
trol. 



O. Reg. 22/67, Sched. 



Reg. 31 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



159 



REGULATION 31 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



ELECTRICIANS 
1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of elec- 
trician ; 

{b) "electrician" means a person who, 

(i) lays out, assembles, installs, repairs, 
maintains, connects or tests electrical 
fixtures, apparatus, control equip- 
ment and wiring for systems of alarm, 
communication, light, heat or power 
in buildings or other structures, 

(ii) plans proposed installations from 
blueprints, sketches or specifications 
and installs panel boards, switch 
boxes, pull boxes and other related 
electrical devices, 

(iii) measures, cuts, threads, bends, 
assembles and installs conduits and 
other types of electrical conductor 
enclosures that connect panels, 
boxes, outlets and other related 
electrical devices, 

(iv) installs brackets, hangers or equip- 
ment for supporting electrical 
equipment, 

(v) installs in or draws electrical conduc- 
tors through conductor enclosures, 

(vi) prepares conductors for splicing of 
electrical connections, secures con- 
ductor connections by soldering or 
other mechanical means and rein- 
sulates and protects conductor con- 
nections, or 

(vii) tests electrical equipment for proper 
function. O. Reg. 72/66, s. 1. 

2. — (1) The certified trade is composed of two 
branches. 

(2) Branch 1 is the trade of a construction and 
maintenance electrician as defined in subclause i of 
clause b of section 1 . 

(3) Branch 2 is the trade of a domestic and rural 
electrician who performs the work of an electrician 
in the construction, erection, repair, remodelling or 
alteration of houses, multiple dwelling buildings con- 



taining six or fewer dwellings, or buildings or struc- 
tures used for farming, or who performs maintenance 
to electrical equipment in houses, multiple dwelling 
buildings containing six or fewer dwellings or farms. 
O. Reg. 72/66, s. 2. 

3. The trade of an electrician is designated as a 
certified trade for the purposes of the Act. O. Reg. 
72/66, s. 3. 

4. An apprentice training program is established 
for the certified trade and shall consist of training 
and instruction, 

(a) at full-time educational day classes pro- 
vided at a College of Applied Arts and 
Technology, 

(i) in either Course 1 or Course 2 as set 
out in Schedule 1, in the case of an 
apprentice in Branch 1, or 

(ii) in Course 3 as set out in Schedule 1, 
in the case of an apprentice in Branch 
2, 

or an equivalent course of training and 
instruction approved by the Director ; and 

(b) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by an employer of the apprentice, 

(i) in either Course 1 or Course 2 as set 
out in Schedule 2, in the case of an 
apprentice in Branch 1, or 

(ii) in Course 3 as set out in Schedule 2, 
in the case of an apprentice in 
Branch 2. O. Reg. 72/66, s. 4, 
revised. 

5. — (1) Subject to subsections 2 and 3, an 
apprentice, 

(a) in Branch 1 shall complete five periods of 
training and instruction of 1800 hours each ; 
and 

{b) in Branch 2 shall complete four periods of 
training and instruction of 1800 hours each . 

(2) An apprentice in Branch 1 who holds a Grade 12 
Secondary School Graduation Diploma shall complete 
five periods of training and instruction of 1600 
hours each. 



160 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 31 



(3) An apprentice in Branch 2 who holds a Grade 
12 Secondary School Graduation Diploma shall 
complete four periods of training and instruction 
of 1600 hours each. O. Reg. 72/66, s. 5. 

6. The holder of a certificate of qualification in 
Branch 2 of the certified trade is entitled to a 
certificate of qualification in Branch 1 of the certified 
trade upon completion of a further period of training 
and instruction of 2000 hours that shall include a 
course of study approved by the Director. O. Reg. 
72/66,8.6. 

7. Any person who, 

(a) applies in the prescribed f ofm for apprentice- 
ship in the certified trade ; and 

{b) becomes an apprentice in the certified trade 
within three months after commencing to 
work in that trade, 

is exempt from subsection 2 of section 10 of the Act. 
O. Reg. 72/66, s. 7. 

8. — (1) Subject to subsection 2, the rate of wages 
for an apprentice in any branch of the certified trade 
whether for his regular daily hours or for hours in 
excess of his regular daily hours shall be not less than, 

(a) 40 per cent , during the first period of training 
and instruction ; 

{b) 50 per cent, during the second period of 
training and instruction ; 

(c) 60 per cent, during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 



{d) 70 per cent during the fourth period of train- 
ing and instruction ; and 

{e) 80 per cent during the fifth period of training 
and instruction, where applicable, 

of the rate of wages or its equivalent for a journey- 
man employed by the same employer in the same 
branch of the trade and with whom the apprentice 
is working. 

(2) The rate of wages for a Branch 2 electrician 
during the 2000 hour period of training and instruction 
mentioned in section 6 shall be not less than 80 
per cent of the wages for a Branch 1 electrician. 
O. Reg. 72/66, s. 8. 

9. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
are the subjects set out in column 1 of schedules 1 
and 2. O. Reg. 72/66, s. 9. 

10. A certificate of qualification expires with the 
last day of February in each year. O. Reg. 72/66, 
s. 10. 

11. The holder of a certificate of quaHfication, or a 
renewal thereof, in either Branch A or Branch B 
of the certified trade of electrician issued under 
Regulation 33 of Revised Regulations of Ontario, 
1970, shall be deemed to be the holder of a certificate 
of qualification in Branch 1 of the certified trade. 
O. Reg. 72/66, s. 11. 

12. The Act and this Regulation do not apply to 
persons permanently employed in an industrial plant 
at a limited purpose occupation in the electrical trade. 
O. Reg. 72/66, s. 12. 



Schedule 1 

ELECTRICIANS In-School Traihng 
COURSE 1 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instructions to be given 


1 


Practical 


Installations. Circuits. Circuit Protection. Controls. Electrical Devices. 
Device Protection. Electrical Measures. 

Testing. Industrial Electronics. 


2 


Theory 


Electrons. Magnetism. Conductors. Semi-Conductors. Insulation. 
Voltage. Current. Power and Energy. Resistance. Capacitance. Induc- 
tion. Electrical Measures. Voltage Drop. Power Loss. Power Factors. 
Electronics. 



Reg. 31 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



161 



COURSE 2 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instructions to be given 


^ 


Practical 


Installations. Circuits. Circuit Protection. Controls. Electrical Devices. 
Device Protection. Electrical Measures. Maintenance. Fault Finding. 
Testing. Industrial Electronics. 


2 


Theory 


Electrons. Magnetism. Conductors. Semi-conductors. Insulation. 
Voltage. Current. Power and Energy. Resistance. Capacitance. 
Induction. Electrical Measures. Voltage Drop. Power Loss. Power 
Factors. Electronics. Fault Analysis. 



COURSE 3 



1 


Practical 


Installations. Circuits. Circuit Protection. Controls. Electrical Devices. 
Device Protection. Electrical Measures. Testing Appliances. Appliance 
Maintenance. Electrical Maintenance. 


2 


Theory 


Electrons. Magnetism. Conductors. Semi-conductors. Insulation. Voltage. 
Current. Power and Energy. Resistance. Capacitance. Induction. 
Electrical Measures. Voltage Drop. Fault Analysis. 



O. Reg. 72/66, Sched. 



Schedule 2 

ELECTRICIANS 
Work Instructions 

COURSE 1 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instructions to be given 


■ 


General Trade Practice 


Trade Tools. Trade Procedures. Layout. 


2 


Roughing-in Procedures 


Raceways. Cable Trays. Conduits. Boxes. Fittings. Wire and Cable. 
Supports. Rigging. 



162 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION Reg. 31 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instructions to be givenr 


3 


Services and Distribution 


Entrances. Distribution Panels. Service Panels. Transformers. Services. 


4 


Finishing Techniques 


Wiring Devices. Lighting. Power. Testing. Measuring. 


5 


Auxiliary Systems, and 
Equipment 


Auxiliary Equipment. Auxiliary Controls. Rotating Equipment. 
Rotating Controls. Transformers. Services. 


6 


Estimating 


Materials. Labour. Work Sequences. Other Trades Participation. 


7 


Canadian Electrical Code 


As related to the trade. 



COURSE 2 



1 


General Trade Practice 


Trade Tools. Trade Procedures. Layout. Rigging. Conduits. Fittings. 
Raceways. Cable Trays. Insulation. Bearings. Couphngs. Seals. Drives. 
Storage. Batteries. Testing and Measuring. 


2 


Power Distribution and 
Conversion 


Service Control. Protective Devices. Converting Devices. 


3 


Power Application 


Illumination. Heating. Cooling. Rotating Devices. Generators. Other 
Activated Devices. 


4 


Trouble Shooting 


Circuits. Controls. Activated Devices. 


5 


Estimating 


Materials. Labour. Work Sequences. Other Trades Participation. 


6 


Canadian Electrical Code 


As related to the trade. 



Reg. 31 APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



163 



COURSE 3 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instructions to be given 


' 


General Trade Practice 


Trade Tools. Trade Procedures. Layout. Conduits. Fittings. Raceways. 
Cable Trays. Insulation. Wire and Cable. Testing and Measuring. 


2 


Power Distribution and 
Conversion 


Service Contrql. Protective Devices. Converting Devices. 


3 


Power Application 


Illumination. Heating. Cooling. Air Conditioning Appliances. Motors. 
Other Activated Devices. 


4 


Power Control 


Control Systems. Control Devices. Communication Systems. Measuring 
Devices. 


5 


Estimating 


Material. Labour. Work Sequences. Other Trade Participation. 


6 


Canadian Electrical Code 


As related to the trade. 



O. Reg. 72/66, Sched. 2. 



164 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 32 



REGULATION 32 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



FUEL AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS 
MECHANIC 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of fuel and 
electrical systems mechanic ; 

(b) "fuel and electrical systems mechanic" 
means a person engaged in the repair and 
maintenance of motor vehicles who, 

(i) repairs and adjusts fuel systems, 

(ii) installs, repairs and removes ignition 
systems, generators, alternators, 
starters, coils, panel instruments, 
wiring and other electrical systems 
and equipment, 

(iii) performs a complete tune-up of an 
engine, and 

(iv) installs, inspects, maintains and re- 
moves motor vehicle air-condition- 
ing systems; 

(c) "motor vehicle" means a vehicle propelled 
by an internal combustion engine, or a 
vehicle operated or controlled from a 
vehicle propelled by an internal combus- 
tion engine, that is registered for use on a 
highway under The Highway Traffic Act 
and is used primarily for the transport of 
persons, equipment or goods but does not 
include a vehicle, 

(i) operated only on rails, 

(ii) used for transportation solely within 
an employer's actual place of busi- 
ness, or 

(iii) used for farming operations but not 
used for carrying a load. O. Reg. 
93/69, s.l. 

2. A fuel and electrical systems mechanic may 
also, 

(a) repair, change and balance wheels and tires ; 

(6) change oil in motor vehicles or lubricate 
motor vehicles, including lubricating the 
front wheel bearings and drive shaft ; 

(c) supply motor vehicles with anti-freezing 
solutions ; 



{d) replace cooling-system hoses, engine-driven 
belts, and thermostats ; and 

{e) perform any other duties normally per- 
formed by a service station attendant. O. 
Reg. 93/69, s. 2. 

3. The trade of fuel and electrical systems mechanic 
is designated as a certified trade for the purposes of 
the Act. O. Reg. 93/69, s. 3. 

4. An apprentice training program for the certi- 
fied trade is established and shall consist of, 

{a) training and instruction at full-time edu- 
cational day classes provided at a College of 
Applied Arts and Technology or in classes 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto ; and 

(6) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by an employer of the apprentice, 

in the subjects contained in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 93/69, s. 4. 

5. — (1) Subject to subsections 2 and 3, an appren- 
tice shall complete three periods of training and 
instruction of 1800 hours per period. 

(2) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma or 
has Ontario Grade 12 standing in English, Math- 
ematics and Science or has such other academic 
quahfication that, in the opinion of the Director, is 
equivalent thereto, he shall complete three periods 
of training and instruction of 1600 hours per period. 



(3) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma 
majoring in auto mechanics or has such other ac- 
ademic quahfication that, in the opinion of the 
Director, is equivalent thereto, he shall complete 
three periods of training and instruction of 1200 
hours per period. O. Reg. 93/69, s. 5. 

6. Any person who, 

(a) applies in the prescribed form for appren- 
ticeship in the certified trade; and 

(b) becomes an apprentice in the certified trade 
within three months after commencing to 
work in that trade, 

is exempt from subsection 2 of section 10 of the Act. 
O. Reg. 93/69, s. 6. 



Reg. 32 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



165 



7. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the certi- 
fied trade whether for his regular daily hours or for 
hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall not be 
less than, 



{a) 50 per cent during the first period of training 
and instruction; 



(b) 70 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; and 



(c) 90 per cent during the third period of training 
and instruction, 

of the average rate of wages for journeymen em- 
ployed by the employer in that trade or, where the 
employer is the only journeyman employed, of the 
average rate of wages for journeymen in the area. 
O. Reg. 93/69, s. 7. 

8. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
are the subjects set out in Parts 1 and 2 of the Sched- 
ule. O. Reg. 93/69, s. 8. 



Schedule 

FUEL AND ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS MECHANIC 

Part 1 

In-School Training 



I 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Mathematics 


Arithmetic 
Geometry 


Addition, subtraction and division of whole numbers 
and fractions, ratio and proportion, areas and 
volumes. 

Lines, planes and angles. 


2 


Science 


Physics 
Mechanics 


Basic laws and principles, formulae. (Given as required 
in shop instruction.) 


3 


English 


Basic Usage and 

Business 

Communications 


Trade terminology and usage. Letters and report 
writing. Work and parts orders. Interpretation and 
use of manufacturers' manuals. 


4 


Drafting 


Basic Drafting and 
Interpretation 


Preparation of elementary working drawings and 
dimensioned sketches of automotive components. 
Interpretation of exploded drawings, electrical and 
hydrauUc circuits and schematics used in manu- 
facturers' manuals. 


5 


General Shop 
Practice 


Safety 
Hand Tools 


Safety rules and safe operating procedures. First 
aid. Fire prevention. Use and maintenance of fire- 
fighting equipment. HandHng of gasoline, oils and 
cleaning solvents. Danger of carbon monoxide fumes. 
Correct use of Hfting and hoisting equipment. Good 
housekeeping. 

Selection and use of hammers, punches, chisels, 
pliers, wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers, hacksaws, 
files, drifts, scrapers, snips, clamps, drill bits, reamers, 
vises, taps and dies. Stud extractors. Hones. 



166 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 32 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Power Tools 
Benchwork 

Measuring 
Instruments 

Fastening Devices 

General Shop 
Equipment 


Use and care of portable air and electric drills, 
impact tools. 

Cutting with hacksaw, filing, scraping, drilling, use 
of drill press. Use of bench grinder; grinding of drill 
bits, chisels, etc. Fitting bushings, honing, cutting 
and flaring tubing. Soldering, gasket making. Oxy- 
acetylene and arc welding and cutting. Brazing 
techniques. Care and maintenance of welding 
equipment. 

Use of rules, straight edges and squares. Feeler 
gauges, caHpers, verniers, micrometers, telescopic 
gauges, dial indicators and pressure gauges. 

Purpose and types of bolts, nuts, studs, screws and 
tube fittings. Thread identification and classifica- 
tion. Tensile strengths. Installation procedures. 
Tightening torques. Cutting internal and external 
threads. Removing broken studs. "HeH-Coil" inserts. 
Purpose and types of rivets, keys, springs, flat and 
lock washers, snap rings, circhps, cotter pins. Installa- 
tion and removal. Thread lubricants, sealers and 
locking compounds. 

Capacities and correct usage of floor cranes, hoists, 
jacks, stands, hydraulic presses, pullers. Operation 
and maintenance of degreasing and steamcleaning 
equipment. Operation and maintenance of air com- 
pressors. Capacities and use of tow trucks and 
related vehicle recovery equipment. 


6 


Internal 

Combustion 

Engines 


Principles, Types and 
Definitions 

Engine Components 

Types and 
Classification of 
Lubricants 

Lubricating Systems 


Principles of operation. 2 and 4 stroke cycles. 
Engine types — single and multi-cylinder, in-Hne, 
slanted, "V" types, flat or pancake. Definition of 
bore, stroke, combustion, piston displacement, clear- 
ance volume, swept volume, compression ratios and 
pressures, horsepower, torque. Engine formulae. 
Heat transfer. Combustion chamber design and 
efficiency. 

Types, purpose and function of major engine com- 
ponents: Cylinder blocks. Pistons, connecting rod 
and crankshaft assemblies. Bearings. Cylinder heads, 
valves and valve trains. Gaskets. Manifolds. Flywheels. 
Effects of cyHnder wear and defective valves, etc., 
on engine performance. Valve timing. Torquing 
procedures. Engine testing. Vacuum and compression 
tests. Valve lash. 

Characteristics of lubricants: Detergent, non- 
detergent, S.A.E. viscosity ratings, A.P.I, classifica- 
tion. Additives. Oil contamination and deterioration. 

Types of engine lubricating systems, pumps, screens 
and filters; full-flow and by-pass types. Pressure 
indication and control. Crankcase ventilation. 
Servicing and overhaul procedures. 



Reg. 32 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



167 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Item 



Cour^ 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Cooling Systems 



Fuel Systems 
(Gasoline) 



Fuel Injection 
Systems 



Fuel Systems 
(Liquefied Petroleum 
Gas and Vaporizing 
Oils) 



Air and liquid cooled systems. Blowers, water pumps, 
fans and drives. Radiators. Thermostats. Hoses and 
connections. Temperature indicators. Autorriatic 
transmission coolers. Pressurized systems. Coolant, 
additives, sealers and antifreeze. Cleaning agents. 
Reverse flushing. Radiator flow testing. Immersion 
heaters. System repair and overhaul procedures. 

Mechanical fuel/vacuum and electric pumps. Pres- 
sure, volume and vacuum tests. Tanks and supply 
lines. Repair and overhaul procedures. Carbure- 
tion ; Fuel/air ratio. Characteristics of carburetors. 
Single, double and 4-barrel types. Up-draft, side 
and down draft, etc. Carburetor operation ; atomiza- 
tion, vapourization, weight of fuel and air, venturi. 
Carburetor circuits and systems. Float, choke, idle, 
main-metering, power and accelerating circuits. 
Heat riser valves, heat insulators and choke tubes. 
Cleaning and overhaul procedures. Cleaning sol- 
vents. Effects of carburetor adjustments on engine 
performance. Tachometer and vacuum gauges. 
Effects of percolation, altitude and atmospheric 
changes, valve overlap and excess heat, incorrect 
float level. Balancing multi-carburetors. Adjust- 
ments to electrical mechanisms, switches, operating 
linkage. Effect on automatic transmission operation. 
Locating excess vacuum leaks. Torquing intake 
manifolds. Effect of air cleaners on engine per- 
formance. Analyzing exhaust gases. Relationship 
between air fuel mixture and exhaust gas. Tune-up 
procedures. Testing, maintaining and replacing 
positive crankcase ventilation systems, dash pots, 
throttle return checks, anti-stall devices. 

Characteristics and operation of fuel injection sys- 
tems, injectors and pumps. Governors. Fuel filters. 
Servicing and overhauling fuel injection systems. 
Test equipment and test procedures. Cleanliness. 
Fuel injection timing. Air induction systems. 
Starting systems. Shutting down runaway engines. 

Use and operation of L.P.G. systems. Charging 
L.P.G. tanks. Principles of operation using vaporiz- 
ing oils. 



Belt Drives 



"V" Belt 
Installation 



Characteristics of "V" Belts, 
and adjusting. 



Inspecting, installing 



Exhaust Systems 



Mufflers, Resonators, 
Exhaust and Tail 
Pipes 



I 



Features of exhaust systems, single, dual and resona- 
tors with mufflers. Dual exhaust systems, cross-over 
pipes and heat riser passages. Back pressure checks. 
Emission control systems; inspection and servicing. 



168 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 32 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Characteristics of insulators, hangers, brackets and 
clamps. Replacing complete exhaust systems or 
parts. Expansion and contraction. Stress relieving 
of system. Exhaust gas leaks. 



Electrical 
Systems 



Basic Electricity 



Automotive Electrical 
Circuits 



Switches and 
Instruments 



Batteries 



Ignition Systems 

(Conventional 

Distributors) 



Ignition Coils 



Definition of amperes, voltage, resistance. Ohm's 
Law. Electron flow. Electro-magnetism. Series 
and parallel circuits. Voltage drop. Use of volt- 
meter, ammeter and ohmmeter. Conductors and 
insulators. 

Characteristics of typical circuits. Voltages and 
currents. Ground circuits. Automotive wire and 
cables. Insulation materials. Flexibility. Resis- 
tance. Joining, splicing and soldering of wires and 
cables. Insulating. Removal and installation of 
terminals, connectors and plugs. Effects of tempera- 
ture, shorts, grounds, poor connections. Resistances 
and fuses. Identification and tracing of circuits. 

Function of automotive electrical switches, relays 
and instruments. Indicator lights. Rheostats, 
resistors, capacitors and semi-conductors. Test, 
repair and replacement procedures. 

Principles, characteristics and function of lead acid 
batteries. Electro-chemical action. Electrolyte. 
Voltage developed. Ampere hour ratings. Sulfa- 
tion. Inspection, testing and maintenance. Use of 
voltmeters, ammeters, load resistances and hydro- 
meters. Battery charging. Charging rates. Charg- 
ing and handling hazards. Dry-charged batteries. 
Activation procedures. 

Function, mounting and driving of distributors. 
Single, tandem, double headed, dual contact points, 
impulse generators for semi-conductor systems, etc. 
Internal electrical circuits. Cam lobes, single and 
double contact points, dwell angle, condensers. Cen- 
trifugal and vacuum advance. Secondary voltage 
distribution. Radio suppression. Ignition timing. 
Distributor tests on and off vehicle. Distributor 
inspection and overhaul procedures. Replacement 
of shafts and bushings; contact point cleaning, re- 
placement and adjustment, alignment and spring 
tension, gap-dwell settings; lubrication of cams, 
pivots and advance mechanisms. Installation and 
timing. Synchronizing dual points and distributors. 
Engine speed settings. 

Characteristics and function. Coil polarity, secon- 
dary voltage range, internal and external resistors, 
temperature effects. Saturation period and coil 
output. Coil Testing equipment; output, insulation 
and polarity tests. ' 



Reg. 32 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



169 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Primary Circuit 
Switches and 
Resistors 

Primary and 
Secondary Circuits 

Transistor and 
Transistorized 
Ignition Systems 



Spark Plugs 



D. C. Charging 
Systems (Generators) 



Regulators 



A. C. Charging 

Systems 
(Alternators) 



Inspection, Testing, 
and Repair 



Starter Motors 



Characteristics. Safety features — automatic trans- 
mission and theft protection. By-passing primary 
circuit resistance for starting. 

Testing primary and secondary circuits. Effects of 
suppression equipment on tests. Arcing corrosion. 
Replacement of primary and high tension wiring. 
Characteristics and application of diodes and tran- 
sistors used in automotive ignition systems. Tran- 
sistor and transistorized systems. Fundamentals 
of operation. Timing procedures. Test equipment. 
Testing and repair procedures. 

Characteristics and operation. Ionization, negative 
polarity, temperature control and heat ranges. Radio 
suppression. Analyzing deposits. Testing, cleaning, 
filing, setting and installing. Tightening torques. 

Characteristics. Internally and externally grounded 
fields. Positive and negative grounded systems. 
Generator construction. Principles of generator 
operation. Electro-magnetic induction. Electrical 

and magnetic circuits. Commutation. 

Construction features. 2 and 3 unit, double contact, 
heavy duty and carbon pile regulators. Principles of 
operation. Voltage and current regulation ; cut-out 
relays. Temperature compensation. 

Characteristics. Internally and externally grounded 
fields. Positive and negative ground systems. In- 
ternally and externally grounded systems. Alter- 
nator construction. Principles of operation. Elec- 
tromagnetic induction. Electrical circuits ("Y" and 
delta). Magnetic circuits. Rectification. Current 
Umitation. A.C. regulators and relays; Vibrating 
contact, transistorized, transistor types. Principles 
of regulator and relay operation. Voltage regulators, 
field relays, indicator light relays. Temperature 
compensation. 

Inspection, and test procedures for generators, alter- 
nators, regulators, relays, wiring and ground cir- 
cuitry. On and off vehicle tests. Removing, dis- 
assembling, cleaning, overhauling, testing and re- 
installing generators, alternators, regulators and 
relays. Cleaning agents. Lubricants. Polarizing 
generator. Contact cleaning, replacing and adjust- 
ing. Air gap adjustments. Replacing transistors 
and diodes. Bench testing and adjustment of regu- 
lators and relays. 

Characteristics. Construction features. Principles 
of operation. Electro-magnetism. Electric circuits, 
magnetic circuits. Series and compound cranking 



170 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 32 



Column 



Item 



Course 



Column 2 



Subject 



Column 3 



Instruction To Be Given 



Special Starting 
Systems 



Lights 



Horns 



Electric Windshield 
Wipers 



Windshield Washers 



Power-Assist Systems 



Heaters and 
Defrosters 



motors. Commutation. Operation of starter motor 
drive units. Bendix, Dyer, over-running clutch, etc. 
Flywheel ring gears. Operation of motor solenoids 
and switches. Solenoid circuits. Neutral safety 
switch. Inspecting and testing starting circuits; 
motors, solenoids, cables and wiring. Removing, 
disassembling, cleaning, overhauling, testing and 
reinstalling. Cleaning agents. Lubricants. Testing 
and servicing component parts of motor. 

Operating principles. Series parallel switches. Series 
parallel and magnetic switch systems. Diesel fuel 
preheating systems (Glow Plugs). Testing, repairing 
or replacing components. 

Type and characteristics of lights. Rating of bulbs 
and seal beam units. Candle power, and wattage. 
Lenses and holders. Signal lights ; flasher units, radio 
interference. Series and parallel circuits. Circuit 
fuses. Ground circuits. Aiming, testing, instalhng 
and repairing lights. 

Characteristics. Electric and air/vacuum types. 
Horn operation. Electrical circuits and relays. Am- 
perage draw. Air/vacuum horn controls. Fuses. 
Inspecting and adjusting horns. 

Characteristics and operation; electric single and 
multi-speed and vacuum types. Drives and linkage. 
Arms and blades. Speed control. Fuses. Washer 
cycling. Overhaul and repair procedures. Replacing 
and adjusting wiper blades and arms. 

Characteristics. Automatic operation and cycling. 
Manual operation. Instalhng, repairing or replacing 
windshield washers and controls. Aiming fluid 
nozzles. 

Characteristics of electrical and electro-hydraulic 
power assist mechanisms and circuits. Windows, 
tailgates, convertible tops, seats, etc. Inspection, 
servicing and overhaul. 

Types, characteristrcs and operation. Component 
features. Methods of testing, adjustment or replace- 
ment of blower motors, actuating and control sys- 
tems. 



10 



Air-Conditioning 
and Refrigeration 
Systems 



Refrigeration 
Principles 



Heat transfer; conduction, convection, radiation. 
British thermal units. Latent heat of vaporization; 
effects of liquid change to vapor and vapor to liquid. 
Effects of pressure on boiling point and condensation. 
Refrigerant. The basic refrigeration system. Air 
induction and condensation removal systems. 



Reg. 32 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



171 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Item 








Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






System Components 


Types, characteristics and operation. Drive units, 
compressors and clutch drives, condensers, receivers, 
expansion valves, evaporators, control valves, ther- 
mostatic controls, blowers, electrical circuits. 
Refrigerant (Freon - 12), refrigeration oils, pressure 
lines and fittings. 






Inspection and 
Maintenance 


Safety precautions and correct use of safety equip- 
ment. Inspection, testing, adjustment, overhaul and 
replacement procedures. Use of gauges and test 
equipment. Importance of exercising system. Oil 
level checks and replenishment procedures. Testing 
for leaks. Purging, evacuating and recharging pro- 
cedures. Procedures for installation and removal of 
motor vehicle air-conditioning and refrigeration 
systems. 


11 


Lubrication 


Types and 
Classification of 
Lubricants 


Identification, properties and characteristics of oils: 
Heavy duty (detergent), regular (non-detergent). 
S. A. E. viscosity ratings. A.P.I, classifications. Other 
types of oils and greases. Additives. Frequency of 
change intervals. 






Engine Lubricating 
Systems 


Function. Lubricant feeds, oil pumps, pressure con- 
trol. Inspection procedures. Detection of leaks. 
By-pass and full-flo oil filters; maintenance and 
replacement. Flushing lubricating systems. Correct 
levels. Positive crankcase ventilation systems; in- 
spection, testing and servicing. 






Open Drive Shafts 


Characteristics; support bearings, universal joints, 
slip joints. Lubrication and sealing. Disassembly, 
relubing, reassembly and reinstallation. Torquing 
universal trunnions. 






Driving Axles and 
Differentials 


Characteristics; gears and bearings. Oil sealing and 
venting. Lubricants. Filling and checking oil levels. 






Standard 
Transmissions 


Characteristics; gears, bearings, components. Lub- 
ricants. Draining and refilling. Correct levels. 






Automatic 
Transmissions 


Characteristics of operation. Cleanliness. Trans- 
mission fluids. Oil seals and vents. Draining, re- 
filling and checking fluid levels. 






Suspension Systems 


Lubricating suspension components and friction 
proofing spring leafs. Sealed systems. 






Steering Systems 
A (Manual) 


Characteristics of steering box gearing. Lubricants. 
Filling and checking levels. 






B (Power) 


Characteristics of power steering systems. Oil seals 
and vents. Types of fluid, capacities. Filling and 
checking system levels. 



172 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 32 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Item 










Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






C (Linkages) 


Characteristics; bushings and joints. Methods of 
sealing and lubricating movable steering joints. 
Sealed systems. 






Front Wheel Bearings 


Types and characteristics. Lubrication; adjusting 
or torquing. Replacing oil seals. 






Generators, 


Types and characteristics of bearings used. Bushes, 






Alternators, 


ball bearings; lubricated and prepacked lubricant 






Starters 


type. Correct type and amount of lubricant where 
necessary. 






Miscellaneous 


Throttle, clutch, gearshift, and emergency brake 






Linkage and Cables 


linkage. Lubricant and lubrication methods where 
necessary. 






Carburetor 


Types and characteristics of air cleaners and filters. 






Air Cleaners 


Inspection, maintenance and replacement. 






Lubrication 


Certification of lubricant and filter changes and 






Certification 


relubing of bearings and components. Extended 
warranties. 




Wheels and Tires 


Wheels and Rims 


Types and characteristics ; single and dual. Removal 
and installation. Wheel wrenches. Wheel to hub 
fastening and locating devices. Handling heavy 
wheels and tires. Inspecting and servicing. Run- 
out. 






Tires, Tubes and 


Types, sizes, characteristics and apphcation. De- 






Valves 


mounting and mounting. Equipment and lubri- 
cants. Repairing tires, tubes and valves. Tire in- 
flation precautions. Inspection for damage, wear 
and faults. Tire rotation. Retreads. 






Balancing Wheels 


Wheel balancing equipment. Balancing wheels and 






and Tires 


related parts. Static and dynamic balance. Weight 
installation. 




Running 


Inspection 


Development of quick visual checking procedures 




Maintenance 


Procedure 


for excessive wear and looseness in steering linkage, 




Inspections 




components and wheel bearings. Buckled wheels, 
broken springs or leafs, weak shock absorbers and 
worn mountings. Defective clutch, service or emer- 
gency brake operation. Defective engine and trans- 
mission mountings., Worn or loose universal joints. 
Worn or defective tires, tubes and valves. Mis- 
alignment. Faults in exhaust systems. Defective 
lights, batteries and hold-downs, wiring and cables. 
Coolant, oil and fluid leaks. Deteriorated hoses, 
loose clamps, damaged lines. Loose or worn "V" 
belts. Defective windshield wipers and washers. 
Overdue lubrication requirements, oil and air-filter 
changes. Reporting of defects or conditions. 



Reg. 32 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



173 



Part 2 

Work Experience Training 



Column 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Work Instruction and Experience 



General Shop 
Practice 



General 



Safety rules and removal of all safety hazards. 

Use of hand and power tools, measuring instruments, 

fastening devices and general shop equipment. 

Benchwork operations. 

(As detailed in Part 1) 



Internal 

Combustion 

Engines 



Types, Components 
and Operation 



I ..biicants 



Lubricating Systems 



Cooling Systems 



Fuel Systems 
(Gasoline) 



Tune-Up and Test 
Procedures 



Familiarization with engine types, components and 
correct operation. Recognition of abnormal engine 
noises and causes. Vacuum and compression testing. 
Identification of effects of cylinder wear, defective 
valves and gaskets and incorrect valve timing on 
engine performance. Torquing heads and mani- 
folds. Adjusting valve lash. 

Familiarization with lubricant characteristics, classi- 
fications and ratings; contamination and deteriora- 
tion, frequency of change intervals. 

Familiarization with types, operation and require- 
ments. Servicing or replacement of full-flow and 
by-pass filters. Testing, servicing and adjustment of 
pressure indicators and controls and positive crank- 
case ventilation systems. 

Air and liquid cooled pressurized systems. 
Inspection, testing, overhaul or replacement of 
blowers, fans, water pumps, drives, radiators and 
caps, thermostats, hoses and connections, tempera- 
ture indicators, immersion and hot water heaters, 
automatic transmission oil coolers. 
Radiator reverse flushing and flow-testing; use of 
cleaning agents, coolant additives, sealers. Testing 
anti-freeze solutions. 

Mechanical fuel/vacuum and electric pumps. Tests 
for pressure, vacuum and volume. Repair, overhaul 
or replacement of pumps, tanks and supply lines. 
Familiarization with principles of carburetion and 
characteristics of carburetors, types, operation, cir- 
cuits and systems; heat riser valves, heat insulators, 
choke tubes, dash pots, throttle return checks, anti- 
stall devices and air cleaners. Testing, adjusting, 
cleaning and overhaul procedures. 

Use of electrical analyzers, vacuum gauges, tacho- 
meters and timing lights to adjust idle speeds and 
mixtures, analyze exhaust gases, locate excess vacuum 
leaks, balance multi-carburetors, check and correct 
ignition timing and operation, adjust electrical 
mechanisms, switches and operating linkage. 
Dynamometer testing to determine engine horse- 
power and torque output. 



174 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 32 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Item 








Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Fuel Injection 
Systems 


Servicing and overhauling fuel injection systems. 
Test equipment and testing operations. 
Injection timing. Servicing and overhauling starting 
systems. Shutting down runaway engines. 






Fuel Systems 
(Liquefied Petroleum 
Gas and Vaporizing 
Oils) 


Use and operation of liquefied petroleum gas and 
vaporizing oil systems. Charging L.P.G. tanks. 


3 


Belt Drives 


"V" Belts 


Inspecting, installing and adjusting. 


4 


Exhaust Systems 


Mufflers, Resonators, 
Exhaust and Tail 
Pipes 


Back pressure checks. Replacing complete exhaust 
systems or parts. Stress relieving. Emission con- 
trol systems ; inspection and servicing. 


5 


Electrical 
Systems 


Automotive 
Electrical Circuits 


Identification, tracing and testing of circuits. Use 
of voltmeters, ammeters and ohmmeters. Joining, 
splicing and soldering wires and cables. Insulating. 
Removal and installation of terminals, connectors, 
plugs, resistances and fuses. 






Switches and 
Instruments 


Switches, relays and instruments, indicator lights, 
rheostats, resistors, capacitors and semi-conductors. 
Testing, repair and replacement. 






Batteries 


Inspection, testing and maintenance. Use of volt- 
meters, ammeters, load resistances and hydrometers. 
Battery charging. Activation of dry-charged bat- 
teries. 






Ignition Systems 

(Conventional 

Distributors) 


Sirigle, tandem, double headed, dual contact points, 
impulse generators (semi-conductor systems), etc. 
Distributor tests on and off vehicle. Inspection and 
overhaul procedures. Replacement of shafts and 
bushings. Contact point cleaning, replacement and 
adjustment. Lubrication. Testing and replacement 
of condensers, rotors, caps, centrifugal and vacuum 
advance mechanisms and radio suppressors. Instal- 
lation and timing. Synchronizing dual points and 
distributors. Engine speed adjustments. 






Ignition Coils 


Inspection, testing and replacement. Use of coil 
testing equipment; output; insulation and polarity 
tests. 






Primary and 
Secondary Circuits 


Testing primary and secondary circuits. Replace- 
ment of primary and high tension wiring, primary 
circuit switches and resistors. 






Transistor and 
Transistorized 
Ignition Systems 


Familiarization with principles of operation. Ig- 
nition timing. Use of test equipment. Testing, 
repair and overhaul procedures. 



Reg. 32 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



175 



Item 



CoLUMjjr 1 



Course 



Column 2 



Subject 



Column 3 



Work Instruction and Experience 



Spark Plugs 



Charging Systems 
I).C. ((ienerators) 
A.C. (Alternators) 



Starter Mot( 



Special Starting 
Systems 



Lights 



Horns 



Windshield Wipers 



Windshield Washers 



Power-Assist Systems 



Heaters and 
Defrosters 



Familiarization with types, temperature control and 
heat ranges. Analyzing deposits. Testing, cleaning, 
gapping and installing. Torquing. 

Inspection and testing of generators, alternators, 
regulators, relays, wiring and ground circuitry. On 
and off vehicle tests. Removing, disassembling, clean- 
ing, overhauling, testing and reinstalling generators, 
alternators, regulators and relays. Lubrication. 
Polarizing generator. Contact cleaning, replacement 
and adjusting. Air gap adjustments. Replacing 
transistors and diodes. Bench testing and adjust- 
ment of regulators and relays. 

Inspecting and testing starting circuits, motors, drive 
units, switches, solenoids, cables and wiring. Re- 
moving, disassembling, cleaning, overhauling, test- 
ing and reinstalling. Lubrication. 

Series parallel and magnetic switch systems. Diesel 
fuel preheating systems (Glow Plugs). Testing, re- 
pairing or replacing components. 

Lighting circuits. Bulbs and seal beam units. Lenses 
and holders. Signal hghts; flasher units. Aiming, 
testing, installing and repairing lights and wiring. 

Electric and air/vacuum types. Electrical circuits 
and relays. Air/vacuum horn controls. Testing, 
adjusting or replacement. 

Electric single and multi-speed and vacuum types. 
Speed controls and washer cycling. Overhaul, 
repair or replacement. 

Instailling, repairing or replacing windshield washers 
and controls. Aiming fluid nozzles. 

Inspection, servicing and overhaul of electrical and 
electro-hydraulic power assist mechanisms and cir- 
cuts; windows, tailgates, convertible tops, seats, etc. 

Testing, adjustment or replacement of blower motors, 
actuating or control systems. 



Air-Conditioning 
and Refrigeration 
Systems 



Inspection and 
Maintenance 



I 



Familiarization with safety precautions and use of 
safety equipment. Inspection, testing, adjustment, 
overhaul or replacement of drive units, compressors 
and clutch drives, condensers, receivers, expansion 
valves, evaporators, control valves, thermostatic 
controls, blowers, electrical circuits, pressure lines 
and fittings, refrigerant. Oil level checks and re- 
plenishment. Purging, evacuating and recharging 
operations. Installation and removal of motor 
vehicle air-conditioning and refrigeration systems. 



176 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 32 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Work Instruction and Experience 



Lubrication 



Wheels and Tires 



Running 

Maintenance 

Inspections 



Lubricants 



Engine Lubricating 
Systems 



Drive Shafts 



Axles and Differentials 

Standard 

Transmissions 

Automatic 
Transmissions 

Suspension Systems 



Steering Systems 
(Manual) 

(Power) 



^Linkages) 



Generators, 
Alternators, 
Starters 

Miscellaneous 
Linkage and 
Cables 

Wheels and Rims 



Tires, Tubes and 
Valves 



Wheel' and Tire 
Balancing 

Inspection 
Procedures 



Familiarization with characteristics, classification 
and ratings; contamination and deterioration, fre- 
quency of change intervals. 

Detection of leaks. By-pass and fuU-flo oil filters; 
inspection, maintenance and replacement. Flushing 
lubricating systems. Checking levels. Testing and 
servicing P.C.V. systems. 

Open drive shafts; support bearings, universal joints, 
slip joints. Disassembly,, relubing, reassembly and 
reinstallation. Torquing. 



Lubricants, 
levels. 



Draining, filling and checking fluid 



Automatic transmission fluids. Draining, refilling 
and checkmg fluid levels. 

Lubricating suspension components; friction proof- 
ing spring leafs. Sealed systems. 

Lubricants. FiUing and checking steering box 
lubricant levels. 

Fluid types ; capacities. Filling and checking system 
levels. 

Relubricating, adjusting or torquing. Oil seal 
replacement. 

Correct type and amount of lubricant where neces- 
sary. 



Throttle, clutch, gearshift, and emergency brake. 
Lubrica^its ; and lubrication where necessary. 



Removal and installation. Inspecting and servicing 
wheels and rims. Checking run-out. 

Demounting and mounting. Inspection for damage, 
wear and faults. Repairing tires, tubes and valves. 
Inflation precautions. Tire rotation. 

Use of on and off vehicle balancing equipment. 
Installation of weights. 

Quick visual checking to ascertain excessive wear, 
damage, defective operation, deterioration, leaks, 
overdue lubrication requirements, filter changes and 
P.C.V. servicing. Reporting conditions. 



O. Reg. 93/69. Sched. 



Reg. 33 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



177 



REGULATION 33 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 

GENERAL training and instruction 



I 



1. This Regulation apphes to any trade for which 
an apprentice training program is estabUshed. 
O.Reg. 342/68,5.1. 

2. An application for apprenticeship in a trade 
shall be in Form 1 . O. Reg. 342/68, s. 2. 

3. No person shall become an apprentice in a trade 
unless he, 

(a) is at least sixteen years of age and has 
Grade 10 standing or other qualifications 
determined by the Minister as equivalent 
thereto ; or 

{b) has the quahfications that are prescribed in 
the regulations for the trade. O. Reg. 
342/68, s. 3, amended. 

4. — (1) An applicant for apprenticeship in a trade 
or for a certificate of qualification shall, if requested 
by the Director, produce a certificate of his birth for 
inspection. 

(2) Where the Director is satisfied that the ap- 
prentice is unable to produce a certificate of his birth, 
the Director may accept as proof, 

(a) one item of Class A evidence of birth as pre- 
scribed in section 8 of Regulation 820 of 
Revised Regulation of Ontario, 1970. 

(b) two items of Class B evidence of birth as 
prescribed in sections 9 and 10 of Regu- 
lation 820 of Revised Regulations of 
Ontario, 1970. O. Reg. 342/68, s. 4. 

5. Sections 8 and 9 and subsection 2 of section 10 
of the Act do not apply to persons, 

{a) permanently employed in an industrial 
plant while performing work entirely within 
the plant and premises or on the land 
appertaining thereto, except work per- 
formed in the maintenance and repair of 
motor vehicles, trailers or conversion units 
registered for use on a highway under The 
Highway Traffic Act; or 

{b) while engaged in a trade or occupation that 
in the opinion of the Director is not one in 
respect of which compliance with sections 8 
and 9 and subsection 2 of section 10 of the 
Act is required. O. Reg. 342/68, s. 5. 



6. An apprentice in a trade shall complete to the 
satisfaction of the Director such apprentice training 
program as is established for the trade. O. Reg. 
342/68, s. 6. 



7. — (1) Every employer in a trade shall, 

(a) provide an apprentice with practical training 
and instructioii ; and 

{b) permit the apprentice to attend such 
educational classes as are prescribed by an 
apprentice training program established 
for the trade. 

(2) Where the employer is unable to provide an 
apprentice with practical training and instruction, 
the employer and the apprentice shall each forthwith 
notify the Director. O. Reg. 342/68, s. 7. 

8. — (1) The regular daily hours of practical train- 
ing and instructions of an apprentice shall not begin 
sooner or end later in each day than the regular daily 
working hours of the journeyman with whom the 
apprentice is working. 

(2) Any hours worked by an apprentice in excess 
of his regular daily hours of practical training and 
instruction shall not be included in computing the 
hours spent in training and instruction, unless 
otherwise prescribed or approved by the Director. 
O. Reg. 342/68, s. 8. 

9. — (1) Hourly credits as the Director determines 
may be granted to an appUcant for a certificate of 
apprenticeship or qualification, 

(a) for the successful completion of a course of 
study or training ; or 

{b) for work performed or experience gained 
in the trade prior to the appHcation. 

(2) No credits shall be granted under subsection 1 
unless the apphcant, 

{a) supplies documentary evidence satisfactory 
to the Director of the completion of the 
course of study or training, or of the work 
performed or the experience gained, as the 
case may be ; or 

(6) passes such tests or examinations as are 
required by the Director. O. Reg. 342/68, 
S.9. 



178 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 33 



10. — (1) Unless otherwise prescribed, the rate of 
wages for an apprentice whether for his regular daily 
hours or for hours in excess of his regular daily hours 
shall be not less than, 

(a) 40 per cent during the first period ; 

{b) 50 per cent during the second period ; 

(c) 60 per cent during the third period ; 

(d) 70 per cent during the fourth period ; and 

{e) 80 per cent during the fifth period, 

of the average rate of wages for journeymen employed 
by the employer in that trade, or where the employer 
is the only journeyman employed, of the average 
rate of wages for journeymen in the area. 

(2) Unless otherwise prescribed, the number of 
apprentices who may be employed by an employer 
in a trade shall not exceed, 

(a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
trade, one apprentice plus an additional 
apprentice for each additional three 
journeymen employed by the employer in 
that trade and with whom the apprentice 
is working ; or 

(6) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the trade, one apprentice for the first 
journeyman employed by the employer plus 
an additional apprentice for each additional 
three journeymen employed by the em- 
ployer in that trade and with whom the 
apprentice is working. O. Reg. 342/68, 
s. 10. 

11. — (1) A contract of apprenticeship shall be in 
Form 2. 

(2) The apprentice shall use to the best of his 
ability any facilities provided for technical instruction. 

(3) The apprentice shall obey all lawful orders 
given to him by the employer or by a person delegated 
by the employer to supervise the work and training of 
the apprentice. 

(4) The apprentice shall furnish to the employer 
satisfactory reasons for any absence from his 
employment. 

(5) The employer shall not employ any person in 
the trade other than a journeyman while the 
apprentice is idle. O. Reg. 342/68, s. 1 1. 

12. — (1) A transfer of a contract of apprentice- 
ship shall be in Form 3. 

(2) The employer to whom the contract is trans- 
ferred shall perform the contract as fully and com- 
pletely as if he were the employer with whom the 
contact was made. O. Reg. 342/68, s. 12. 



CERTIFICATES 

13. A certificate of apprenticeship shall be in 
Form 4. O. Reg. 342/68, s. 13. 

14. — (1) Where an apprentice has completed an 
apprentice training program, and has passed such 
final examinations as are prescribed by the Director, 
the Director shall issue a certificate of apprentice- 
ship to the apprentice. 

(2) Where an examination for a certificate of ap- 
prenticeship in a trade has been estabUshed as an 
Interprovincial Standards Examination and, where 
an apprentice obtains more than 69 per cent on that 
examination, he shall be awarded the Interprovincial 
seal on his certificate. 

(3) Where a certificate of apprenticeship is 
obtained before an Interprovincial Standards Exam- 
ination for the trade is established, the holder of the 
certificate may write the examination referred to in 
subsection 2 and if he obtains more than 69 per cent 
on that examination he shall be awarded the Inter- 
provincial seal on his certificate. O. Reg. 342/68, 
s. 14. 

15. — (1) An application for a certificate of quali- 
fication in a trade designated as a certified trade 
under section 10 of the Act shall be in Form 5. 

(2) An application for renewal of a certificate of 
quaUfication in a trade designated as a certified trade 
under section 10 of the Act shall be in Form 6. 

(3) A certificate of qualification shall be in Form 7, 
O. Reg. 342/68, s. 15. 

16. — (1) Where an apphcant for a certificate of 
quahfication is the holder of a certificate of 
apprenticeship in the trade issued under the Act 
or a predecessor of the Act, the Director may, upon 
payment of the prescribed fee, issue to the applicant, 
without examination, a certificate of quahfication. 

(2) Where an appHcant for a certificate of 
quahfication is the holder of a certificate of apprentice- 
ship in the trade that is issued by another Province 
and that bears a seal awarded for passing an 
Interprovincial Standards Examination, the Director 
may, upon payment of the prescribed fee, issue to the 
applicant, without examination, a certificate of 
quahfication. 

(3) Where an applicant for a certificate of qualifica- 
tion is required to write an examination, he shall pay 
the fee prescribed therefor. 

(4) Where an applicant for a certificate of quali- 
fication who is not the holder of a certificate of 
apprenticeship in the trade, 

(a) has attended a trade school hcensed under 
the Act and has completed the period of 



Reg. 33 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



179 



training and instruction provided by the 
trade school ; 

(b) after graduation from the licensed trade 
school, works as an apprentice in the trade 
for a period prescribed by the Director ; and 

(c) passes such examination as is prescribed by 
the Director, 

the Director may, upon payment of the prescribed 
fee, issue to the apphcant a certificate of qualification. 
O. Reg. 342/68, s. 16. 

17. An apphcant for a certificate of apprentice- 
ship or a certificate of qualification who has failed 
to pass an examination may rewrite the examination 
at such times and places as are fixed by the Director. 
O. Reg. 342/68, s. 17. 

18. An applicant for a certificate of apprentice- 
ship or a certificate of qualification who fails to pass 
on rewriting the examination referred to in section 17 
on two occasions shall attend and complete such train- 
ing courses as the Director may determine before 
being permitted to rewrite the examination a third 
time. O. Reg. 342/68, s. 18. 

19. Where an apphcant for a certificate of quali- 
fication, who is not the holder of a certificate of 
apprenticeship in the trade, supplies evidence satis- 
factory to the Director of having been continuously 
engaged in the trade as a journeyman in Ontario or 
elsewhere for a period equal to or greater than the 
apprenticeship period prescribed for the trade, the 
Director may issue to the applicant a provisional 
certificate of quahfication vaUd until the expiry date 
specified thereon. O. Reg. 342/68, s. 19. 

20. Where an applicant for a certificate of quah- 
fication referred to in section 19 passes such examina- 
tion as is prescribed by the Director, the Director may, 
upon payment of the prescribed fee, issue to the 
applicant a certificate of quahfication. O. Reg. 
342/68, s. 20. 

21. A provisional certificate of qualification shall 
be in Form 8. O. Reg. 342/68, s. 21. 

22. — (1) Where a certificate of quahfication that 
is in force on the 3rd day of September, 1970 
expires and is renewed it shall be renewed for a 
period to and including the birthday of the holder 
next following or his second birthday next following 
as the Director may determine and any subsequent 
renewal shall be for a period of two years expiring 
on the birthday of the holder thereof. O. Reg. 
383/70, s. 1, amended. 

(2) Unless otherwise prescribed by regulation, a 
certificate of qualification issued after the 3rd day of 
September, 1970 expires on the birthday of the 
holder next following or his second birthday next 
following as the Director may determine. O. Reg. 
383/70, s. 1, amended. 



(3) Where a certificate of qualification mentioned 
in subsection 2 expires and is renewed it shall be 
renewed for a period of two years expiring on the 
birthday of the holder thereof. O. Reg. 383/70, s. 1 . 

(4) A certificate of quahfication may be renewed 
by the holder upon apphcation and payment of the 
prescribed fee to the Director. O. Reg. 342/68, 
s. 22 (2). 

(5) Upon renewal of a certificate of quahfication, 
a seal provided by the Director indicating the year 
for which the certificate is renewed shall forthwith 
upon its receipt by the apphcant be affixed to the 
certificate of qualification in the space provided 
thereon. O. Reg. 342/68, s. 22 (3). 

23. — (1) Subject to subsections 2 and 3, where a 
person fails to renew his certificate of quahfication 
on or before the date of its expiry, the Director may 
renew the certificate upon payment of the prescribed 
fee for renewal thereof. O. Reg. 342/68, s. 23 (1); 
O. Reg. 383/70, s. 2 (1). 

(2) Where a certificate of quahfication is not 
renewed within one year of the date of its expiry, 
the Director shall not renew the certificate unless 
the applicant has passed an examination prescribed 
by the Director. O. Reg. 342/68, s. 23 (2); O. Reg. 
383/70, s. 2 (2). 

24. — (1) The Director may suspend or cancel a 
certificate of quahfication, 

(a) where the holder is convicted of an offence 
under the Act or the regulations ; or 

{h) where the Director has reasonable grounds 
to believe that the holder is without capacity 
or not competent to perform work in the 
trade with reasonable skill. 

(2) The Director shall not suspend or cancel a 
certificate of qualification without a hearing upon 
notice personally served or sent by registered mail 
to the holder of the certificate of quahfication at the 
address shown on his apphcation for a certificate of 
qualification or a renewal thereof containing details of 
the alleged offence, incapacity or incompetence and 
the nature of the evidence in support thereof and the 
date, time and place for the hearing. 

(3) The Director shall allow seven clear days be- 
tween the date of service or maihng of the notice and 
the date of the hearing. 

(4) If the holder of the certificate of quahfication 
fails to attend the hearing on the date and at the time 
and place appointed, the hearing may proceed and a 
decision may be made in his absence. 

(5) At the hearing the holder of the certificate of 
qualification is entitled to hear the evidence, to cross- 
examine, to call witnesses, and to present argument. 



180 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 33 



(6) The holder of the certificate of quahfication 
may be represented by counsel or by an agent. 

(7) The Director shall not suspend a certificate of 
quahfication for a period of more than thirty days. 
O. Reg. 342/68, s. 24. 

25. — ( 1 ) A person whose certificate of qualification 
has been suspended or cancelled may, by notice in 
writing within seven days of the suspension or cancel- 
lation, appeal the decision of the Director to the 
Minister or such other person as is designated in writ- 
ing by the Minister for the purpose. 

(2) The Minister or such other person designated 
by him shall set the date, time and place for the hearing 
of the appeal, and notice of such hearing shall be 
served personally or sent by registered mail to the 
person appealing. 

(3) If the person appeahng fails to attend the 
hearing of the appeal on the date and at the time and 
place appointed, the hearing may proceed and a 
decision may be made in his absence. 

(4) At the hearing of the appeal, the person 
appealling is entitled to be represented by counsel 
or by an agent, and to hear the evidence, to cross- 
examine, to call witnesses, and to present argument. 

(5) The Minister or such other person designated 
by him shall hear the evidence and submissions and 
may uphold the decision of the Director or suspend, 
cancel or reinstate the certificate of qualification. 

(6) The decision of the Minister or such other 
person designated by him shall be final and binding. 
O. Reg. 342/68, s. 25. 

26. A person whose certificate of qualification has 
been cancelled may apply for a new certificate of 
quahfication upon such terms and conditions as the 
Director may prescribe, and the Director may issue 
a certificate of quahfication where he is satisfied that 
the person has complied with such terms and condi- 
tions, and has the capacity and competence to perform 
work in the trade with reasonable skill. O. Reg. 
342/68. s. 26. 

27. Where a person proves to the satisfaction of 
the Director that, 

{a) his certificate of quahfication has been 
lost or destroyed ; or 

(6) his name has been changed, 

the Director shall issue to him a duplicate certificate 
of quahfication. O. Reg. 383/70, s. 3. 



28. The holder of a certificate of qualification shall 
carry the certificate on his person and, when 
requested to do so, produce to a person designated 
by the Director, the certificate of qualification or 
such other evidence of quahfication as the Director 
may prescribe. O. Reg. 342/68, s. 28; O. Reg. 
383/70, s. 4. 



29. Where a person, after applying for or 
receiving a certificate of quahfication, changes his 
address he shall within fifteen days thereafter 
notify the Director in writing of his former and new 
addresses and, where he has received the certificate, 
the number thereof. O. Reg. 383/70, s. 5. 



REGISTRATION OF EMPLOYERS 

30. When requested by the Director, every em- 
ployer and self-employed person engaged in a trade 
shall complete and file a registration of employers and 
self-employed persons in Form 9. O. Reg. 342/68, 
S.29. 



FEES 

31. Fees payable under this Regulation are as 
follows : 

1. For registration of a contract of 
apprenticeship $ 5 

2. For an examination $10 

3. For an initial certificate of qualifica- 
tion or a renewal of a certificate of 
qualification, 50 cents per month or 
any portion thereof during the 
period of its validity, but in no case 
shall the fee exceed $5 for any period 
of not more than twelve months 
or $10 for any period exceeding 
twelve months and not more than 
twenty-four months. 

4. For a certificate of qualification issued 
to any person who works or is employed 
in a certified trade and is exempted by 
regulation from the application of 
sections 8 and 9 and subsections 2, 3 
and 4 of section 10 of the Act $10 

O. Reg. 383/70, s. 6. 



Reg. 33 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



181 



Form 1 

The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 
APPLICATION FOR APPRENTICESHIP IN THE TRADE OF 



(Trade name) (Date) 

TO BE COMPLETED BY APPLICANT: 

Surname 



Given names and initials 
Street No. and Name . . . 



Social Insurance No. 
Telephone No. 



Apt. No., Box No., R.R. No. 

City or Town 

Township 



EMPLOYED BY 

Name of Business . 
Street Adress .... 
City or Town .... 
Telephone No ... . 



day month year 

Date of Birth 



(signature of appUcant) 



day year 

Start of Employment 



(signature of employer) 

Outline relevant trade experience, proof of employment and education, on reverse side of this application, 
giving full details including dates and names of employers. 



FOR DEPARTMENTAL USE ONLY: 
Counsellor Name 



Credited hours 



Counsellor Signature 



Counsellor Code 



Receipt No. 



Verification Signature 



Periods in Program 



Hours per period 



Hours per week 



182 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 33 



Contracts Forwarded 



Effective Date 



Contract No. 
Area Code . . . 
Mailing Code , 



day 



month 



year 



(reverse) 
PROOF OF EDUCATION 





Schooling 




Elementary. . 


School Name 


Location 

(City/County, 

etc.) 


Successi 
Grade 


ully Completed 
Mo. Yr. 


Certificate or 
Diplomas Awarded 
















Secondary. . . 
























Academic . . . 












Vocational. . . 












Technical . , . 



























Subject (s) 

Specialized 


P.A.T. 
Results 










Courses Attended— List all training (other 
than school) 


Comments (Counsellor) 



















Reg. 33 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



183 



DETAILS OF EXPERIENCE 





Name of Business 
or Firm 


Business Address 


Emp] 
From 
Month/Year 


oyed 

To 
Month/Year 


Cr. Hrs. 


Type of Work 
Performed 


Current 
or Last 


























1st 
Previous 


























2nd 
Previous 


























3rd 
Previous 


























Employer Signature: ^ 


Total 




Supervising Counsellor : 







O. Reg. 342/68, Form 1. 

Form 2 

The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen' s Qualification Act 

CONTRACT OF APPRENTICESHIP 

Contract No 

THIS CONTRACT OF APPRENTICESHIP MADE this day of , 19. . . ., 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen' s Qualification Act, 

BETWEEN hereinafter called the Apprentice, 

— and — 
hereinafter called the Employer, 

— and — 

(where the apprentice is under twenty-one years of age) 

the Parent, Guardian, or Judge 

WITNESSETH that the Apprentice and the Employer agree as follows : 

1 . The Apprentice agrees to faithfully serve the Employer as an Apprentice and in accordance with The 
Apprenticeship and Tradesmen' s Qualification Act and the regulations for a period of training and 



184 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 33 



instruction of hours in the trade of 



2. The Employer agrees to faithfully train and instruct the Apprentice in the trade of. 
and to pay the Apprentice wages at the following rates : 

For the first hours, % of the journeyman's rate. 

For subsequent hourly periods and in the following sequence, ~ 

hours at % 

hours at % 

hours at % 

hours at % 

hours at %, 

of a journeyman's rate of wages in the trade. 
IN WITNESS WHEREOF the parties have signed. 
WITNESS: 



Employer 



Address of Employer 



Apprentice 



Address of Apprentice 



Parent, Guardian or Judge 



Approved and Registered this day of . 



Address of Parent, Guardian or Judge 
19 



Director 

Termination Date Cancellation Date. 

Transfer Date Transfer Date. 



Transfer Date Transfer Date 

O. Reg. 342/68, Form 2. 



R^g- 33 APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 185 

Form 3 

The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 
TRANSFER OF CONTRACT OF APPRENTICESHIP 



In the Trade of Contract No. 

THE CONTRACT OF APPRENTICESHIP made between 



the Apprentice, of and 

(address) 



, the Employer, of , 

(address) 

dated the dayof ,19 and the mutual rights, benefits and obligations 

contained therein are hereby transferred to of 

(address) 

The said apprenticeship having commenced on the day of , 19 .... , 

has continued during periods of hours, and the said Apprentice has com- 
pleted the following hours at the indicated percentages of the average rate of wages for journeymen employed 
by the Employer in the said trade or of the average rate of wages for journeymen in the area, as the case may be : 

hours during the first period at % 

hours during the second period at % 

hours during the third period at % 

hours during the fourth period at % 

hours during the fifth period at % 

I Dated this day of ,19 

I IN WITNESS WHEREOF the parties have signed. 

WITNESS: 



Employer transferring contract 
Employer to whom contract is transferred 



Apprentice 
(and where the Apprentice is under twenty-one years of age) 



Parent, Guardian or Judge 



Address of Parent, Guardian or Judge 

O. Reg. 342/68, Form 3. 



186 APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICA TION Reg. 33 

Form 4 

The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 

CERTIFICATE OF APPRENTICESHIP 

Certificate No 

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT 

having complied with The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act and the regulations is issued this 



Certificate of Apprenticeship in the trade of 

Dated at Toronto, this day of , 19 . 



(signature of issuer) 

O. Reg. 342/68, Form 4. 



Form 5 

The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 
APPLICATION FOR CERTIFICATE OF QUALIFICATION IN THE CERTIFIED TRADE OF 

(Trade name) (Date) 

TO BE COMPLETED BY APPLICANT: 



Surname 



Social Insurance No. 



Given name and initials Telephone No. 
Street Address 



day month year 
City or Town Date of Birth 



Township , 



(signature of appHcant) 



EMPLOYED BY: 

Name of Business 

Street Address 

City or Town 

Are you self-employed? Q No Q Yes 



Have you been An Apprentice in Ontario ? D No Q Yes 



(Specify) 

Contract or Diploma No. 
Do you hold an Ontario Certificate of Qualification in any other trade ? Q No D Yes 
(Specify) 



Certificate No. Trade Name 



Reg. 33 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



187 



Do you hold a Certificate of Qualification issued by any other Province ? Q No n Yes — Attach 
original or copy of certificate(s) to this application. 

FEE: Application Fee of $5.00, payable to "Treasurer, Province of Ontario". 

Send Money Order or Certified Cheque. 

Fee will be applied to issuance of certificate or examination. 

Outline experience on reverse side of this application giving full details of employment including 
dates and names of employers. 



FOR DEPARTMENTAL USE ONLY: 



Authorizing Signature 



Effective Date 

Certificate No. 
Area Code .... 
Mailing Code . . 



day month year 



(reverse) 
DETAILS OF EXPERIENCE 



PROOF OF — must accompany this application 
EXPERIENCE — proof may be in any of the following forms : 

1 . Letters of reference from former and present employers 
(written on company letterhead) giving, 

(a) the exact dates of employment ; and 

{b) a detailed description of the type of work per- 
formed. 

OR 

2. A letter of reference from the business agent of a Union, 
where this procedure has been given prior approval by 
the Industrial Training Branch. 

3. If you are unable to obtain the above proofs, a statutory 
declaration, notarized by a Notary Public or Commis- 
sioner for taking affidavits, must be obtained, listing, 

{a) your present and former employers ; 

(6) exact dates of employment ; and 

(c) detailed description of the type of work performed. 

4. Original or copy of any Out-Of-Province Certificate. 

Note: The above documents will be returned when this 
application has been evaluated. 



PLEASE LIST DETAILS OF RELATED 
EXPERIENCE AND COURSES 



188 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 33 





Name of Business 
or Firm 


Business Address 


Emp 
From 
Month/Year 


oyed 

To 
Month/Year 


Type of Work 
Performed 


Current 
or Last 






















1st 
Previous 






















2nd 
Previous 






















3rd 
Previous 






















4th 
Previous 























O. Reg. 342/68, Form 5. 



Form 6 

The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen s Qualification Act 
APPLICATION FOR RENEWAL OF A CERTIFICATE OF QUALIFICATION 
Under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act and the regulations, I apply for a 

renewal of my Certificate of Qualification in the trade of 

My Social Insurance No. is 

Dated day of ,19 

Apphcant Signature 

If change in name or address, please complete below 

Surname 

Given names or initials 

Street Address 

City 



Reg. 33 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



189 



THIS SPACE FOR DEPARTMENTAL USE ONLY 

Date approved 

New serial No 

Date issued 

O. Reg. 342/68. Form 6. 
Form 7 
The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 
CERTIFICATE OF QUALIFICATION 

Certificate No 

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT 

having complied with The Apprenticeship and Tradesmens' Qualification Act and the regulations is issued 

this Certificate of Qualification in the certified trade of 

Dated at Toronto, this day of , 19 



(signature of issuer) 

O. Reg. 342/68, Form 7. 
Form 8 
The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen' s Qualification Act 
PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATE OF QUALIFICATION 



Surname 



Given Names 



Trade Name 



Trade Name 



Street Address 



Issue Date 



Expiry Date 



City or Town 



Township 



P.C. N( 



Date of Birth 



Telephone No. 



Social Insurance No. 



This is to certify that the above has submitted satisfactory proof of experience, and is hereby permitted 
to work in the trade indicated until the expiry date shown, at which time he will be required to write an examina- 
tion for a regular certificate of qualification pursuant to subsection 2 of section 8 of The Apprenticeship and 
Tradesmen' s Qualification Act. 

ONTARIO DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 



(Director, Industrial Training Branch) 

This form must be presented when reporting for examination and will not be valid after the expiry date 
indicated above. 



If unable to attend, please notify this office prior to expiry date. Failure to attend or notify will result in the 
forfeiture of fee. 



190 APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION Reg. 33 

FOR DEPARTMENTAL USE ONLY 
Employer or School — Name and Address 



Request for Application 

Telephone Mail Other 



Requested Mailed Received Certificate Issued Certificate No. 

O. Reg. 342/68, Form 8. 



Form 9 

The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 
REGISTRATION OF EMPLOYERS AND SELF-EMPLOYED PERSONS IN THE TRADE OF 



TO THE DIRECTOR: 

Under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualication Act and the regulations, I register as an 

employer or self-employed person in the certified trade of 

and furnish the following information : 

1 . Name (if not a corporation) 

(surname) (first and middle names) 



Name (if a corporation) 
2. Address 



(street and No. or R.R.) (city, town or post office) 

3. Certificate of Qualification, if not a corporation : 

(a) I am the holder of Certificate of Qualification Number in the certified trade of 

issued on ; or 

(b) I am not the holder of a Certificate of Qualification in the certified trade of 

but have been continuously engaged in such trade for years. 

4. Particulars of persons in my employ in the certified trade of 



Reg. 33 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



191 



Name 


Address 


Total Length of 

Experience at the 

trade 


Branch 
if any 


Date of 
Birth 


Certificate 
No. 


Years 


Months 



















































































































Dated at , this . 



, day of . 



19, 



(signature) 
O. Reg. 342/68, Form 9. 



192 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 34 



REGULATION 34 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



GLAZIER AND METAL MECHANIC 

1. In this Regulation, 

{a) "certified trade" means the trade of glazier 
and metal mechanic ; 

(6) "glazier and metal mechanic" means a 
person who, 

(i) performs layout, fabrication, assem- 
bly and installation of extruded 
frames, hardware, store fronts, wall 
facings, manualslidingdoors, window 
sashes, manual door closers, auto- 
matic door operators and curtain 
walls, 

(ii) performs layout, fabrication, assem- 
bly and installation of suspended 
glass fronts, stuck glass fronts, 
auto glass, art glass, aquariums and 
similar special products, 

(iii) cuts, fits and installs glass in wood 
and metal frames for windows, 
skylights, store fronts and display 
cases, or on building fronts, interior 
walls, ceilings, tables and similar 
surfaces by means of mastic, screws 
or decorative moldings, and 

(iv) reads and understands design draw- 
ings, manufacturers' literature and 
installation diagrams. O. Reg. 
309/70, s. 1. 



2. The trade of glazier and metal mechanic is 
designated as a certified trade for the purposes of the 
Act. O. Reg. 309/70, s. 2. 



3. An apprentice training program for the certi- 
fied trade is established and shall consist of, 

(a) training and instruction at full time edu- 
cational day classes provided at a College 
of Applied Arts and Technology or in 
courses that, in the opinion of the Director, 
are equivalent thereto, in the subjects 
contained in Schedule 1 ; and 

(b) practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by the employer of the apprentice in 
the subjects contained in Schedule 2. 
O. Reg. 309/70, s. 3. 



4. — (1) Subject to subsection 2, an apprentice 
shall complete four periods of training and instruction 
of 2000 hours per period. 

(2) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School graduation diploma or has 
at least a pass standing in Grade 12 English, Mathe- 
matics and Science, or has such other academic 
qualification that, in the opinion of the Director, is 
equivalent thereto, he shall complete four periods 
of training and instruction of 1800 hours per period. 
O. Reg. 309/70, s. 4. 

5. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
in the certified trade are the subjects contained in 
schedules 1 and 2. O. Reg. 309/70, s. 5. 



6. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the 
certified trade whether for his regular daily hours or 
for hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall 
not be less than, 

(a) 60 per cent during the first 1000 hours of 
training and instruction ; 

(t) 65 per cent during the second 1000 hours of 
training and instruction ; 

(c) 70 per cent during the third 1000 hours of 
training and instruction ; 

(d) 75 per cent during the fourth 1000 hours of 
training and instruction ; 

{e) 80 per cent during the fifth 1000 hours of 
training and instruction ; 

(/) 85 per cent during the sixth 1000 hours of 
training and instruction ; 

is) 90 per cent during the seventh 1000 hours 
of training and instruction ; and 

(h) 95 per cent during the eighth 1000 hours 
of training and instruction, 

of the average hourly rate of wages or its equivalent 
for journeymen employed by the employer in that 
trade and with whom the apprentice is working. 
O. Reg. 309/70, s. 6. 



7. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the certified trade shall 
not exceed, 



Reg. 34 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



193 



(a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
trade, one apprentice plus an additional 
apprentice for every four journeymen em- 
ployed by that employer in the trade and 
with whom the apprentice is working; and 

(b) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the trade, one apprentice for the first 
journeyman employed by the employer plus 
an additional apprentice for each additional 
four journeymen employed by that employer 



in the trade and with whom the apprentice 
is working. O. Reg. 309/70. s. 7. 

8. Sections 8 and 9 and subsections 2, 3 and 4 of 
section 10 of the Act do not apply to any person who 
works or is employed in the certified trade. O. Reg. 
309/70. s. 8. 

9. A certificate of quahfication in the certified 
trade is not required to be renewed. (). Reg. 309/70, 
s. 9. 



Schedule 1 

GLAZIER AND METAL MECHANIC 
In-School Training 



I 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Mathematics 
(Trade Related) 


Mathematics 
Geometry 


Addition, subtraction, multiphcation and division 
of whole numbers, fractions and decimals, ratio and 
proportion, areas. Radian measure, right angle 
triangle, square root, simple formulae and equations. 

Lines, planes and angles: application to layout. 


2 


Science 


Physics 


Basic laws and principles, properties of matter, 
formulae. (Given as required in shop instruction). 


3 


English 


Usage and Business 
Communication 


Trade terminology and usage. Sentence and para- 
graph structure. Letter and report writing. Work 
and parts orders. Interpretation and use of manu- 
facturers' manuals, job specifications. 


4 


Drafting 


Basic Drafting 
and Interpretation 


Drafting techniques: scales, symbols, projections. 
Preparation of elementary trade related working 
drawings and dimensioned sketches. Reading and 
interpretation of floor plans and elevations : sectional 
and cross sectional details. 


5 


General Trade 
Practice 


Safety 
Hand Tools 


Safety rules and safe operating procedures. Protec- 
tive clothing and equipment. First aid. Fire 
prevention; use and maintenance of fire fighting 
equipment. Handling and storage of flammable and 
toxic solvents and materials. The Construction Safety 
Act. The Workmen's Compensation Act. Correct 
lifting methods and use of lifting and hoisting equip- 
ment. Handling crated, loose and broken glass. 
Safe use of electrical tools and equipment and 
powder actuated tools. Truck and vehicle condition 
and loading. Good housekeeping. 

Selection, care and use of: hammers, screwdrivers, 
wrenches, files, alien keys, punches, rivetting tools, 



194 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 34 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Power Tools and 
Equipment 



Glass Handling 
Devices and 
Equipment 



Measuring and 
Marking Tools 



Benchwork 



Cutting-Table 
Operations 



Fastening Devices 



nail sets, scrapers, taps, pliers, clamps, snips, cold 
chisels and wood chisels, hacksaws, glass cutters: 
— diamond, fixed and interchangeable wheel ; hackout 
knives, handstones, crow-bars, paint brushes and 
soldering equipment. Putty knives, caulking guns 
and dry glazing tools and point setters. 

Care and use of portable air/electric drills, power 
tap guns and screwdrivers. Power circular and jig 
saws, routers. Powder actuated tools. Grinders: 
bench and portable, belt sanders; wheel and belt, 
abrasive grades. Types and characteristics of drill 
bits and hole saws; drill gauge use. Grinding and 
sharpening procedures. Hand-brake and shears. 
Scaffolds, swing stages (manual and electric). Ladders 
and steps. Heating boxes. 



Types, care and correct usage: suction cups, slings 
and webs, gloves and hand rubbers. Power suction 
gear use. Loose and crated glass dollies. Stationary 
and moveable racks. 

Care and use of rules, straight edges, protractors, 
squares and scribes. Centre-punches, angle dividers. 
Spirit levels, transits and plumb-bobs, chalk and 
mason's Hnes. Measuring: use of grid and base 
lines and benchmarks. Layout of right angles by 
measurement. 

Metal, wood, plastics and masonry; sawing, filing, 
chipping, shearing, braking, drilling and chiselling. 

Glass cutting principles and methods for: sheet, 
polished plate, patterned and shaped glass. Cutter 
type selection, use, cooling and lubrication require- 
ments. Free-hand cutting. Use of templates, 
straight edges, wood squares, circle cutters. Cutting 
inner and outer circles. Faulty cut causes and 
detection. Glass cut breaking methods. Hand 
finishing glass edges: hand stone types and usage. 
Purpose of wetting stone. Procedures for arrissing 
and grinding : angles and purpose. 

Types and sizes of woodscrews, sheet metal screws, 
self-tapping screws, expansion shields, toggle bolts, 
powder actuated fasteners, nuts and bolts, washers, 
rivets, nails, specially designed masonry fasteners. 
Factors governing selection. Screw thread terminol- 
ogy and systems. Thread purpose and fit classi- 
fication. Installation and removal procedures. 
Torque setting. Locking methods. Drilling and 
tapping procedures. Power tapping. Removal of 
broken taps, studs and screws. 



Reg. 34 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



195 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be G\\ 



Glass 



Glass Facts 



Glass Manufacturing 
Processes 



Glass Function and 
Recognition 



Miscellaneous Glasses 



History. Composition. Properties: viscosity, devi- 
trification, specific gravity. Thermal expansion and 
conductivity. Tensile, compressive and impact 
strengths. Light reflection loss. Sound transmis- 
sion. Maximum glass sizes. 

Manufacture: mixing (frit), melting, drawing, an- 
nealing. Sheet glass: crown process, bulls-eyes or 
bullions, cylinder and flat drawn. Rolled glass: 
rolled and rough cast, cathedral and figured rolled, 
wired glasses. Polished plate glass. Float glass. 

Purpose, thickness and qualities. 

— Transparent glass: sheet, polished plate and float 
glass: thickness specifications and quality selection. 

— Translucent glass: cathedral, figured, rolled, 
antique, sand-blasted and acid-etched glasses; 
thickness specifications and tints. 

— Opal glasses; flashed opal and pot opal sheet, 
rolled and polished opal sheet; thickness speci- 
fications and colours. 

— Special purpose glasses ; wired-cast or polished 
(georgian, hexagonal, diamond, single-strand). Tough- 
ened glass: fully tempered and heat-treated types; 
thickness and size limitations, edge conditions and 
configurations, warpage. 

— Laminated glass: dual and multiple. 

— Heat absorbing sheet, plate and rough glass; 
thickness, colour, tint, transmission factors, edge 
condition. 

— Heat reflecting glass: sheet and plate; thickness, 
colour, tint density, heat reflection and light trans- 
mission factors, edge condition. 

— Lead-plate glass (x-ray) : thickness, cutting 
methods and problems. 

— Prismatic glass: light refraction properties. 

— Cladding (Spandrel) glasses: plate, sheet, textured, 
standard and special colours; heat strengthening, 
warpage, size limitations. 

Factory sealed units of plate, sheet, wired, textured 
or patterned, heat-absorbing or heat-reflecting and 
toughened glass; size Hmitations, air seal, air space, 
edge protection. Insulation factors, effective conden- 
sation control. Methods of avoiding thermal breaks 
in units. 

— Veneer and structural glasses: glass veneers, fire- 
finished, mechanical polished and float finished 
surfaces: annealed, toughened and laminated types; 
size limitations, colour range and matching, thick- 
ness. Edge and hole preparation, integral lettering 
or design. 



196 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 34 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Mirrors 



Glass Preparation 



Plastics 



— Structural glass blocks and channels, surface 
textured, corrugated and wired glasses; size limi- 
tations. 

Plate, sheet, tinted and antique glass; glass quality, 
toughening, decorative cut, bevelled, sand-blasted, 
etched. Framed mirrors. Single mirror exposed 
edge installation : use of clips and rosettes. Multiple 
mirrors; ground and pohshed to butt. Mirror-fiex 
and mirror-pane. 

— Transparent mirrors: annealed, toughened, tinted; 
size hmitations, surface protection. Light intensity 
differential, effective light ratios. 

Cutting tolerances. Chipping and nipping, notching. 
Edgework procedures: grinding, pohshing, mitering, 
leveUing. DrilHng techniques: use of carboloy, 
triangular or spade, tubular (regular or diamond 
impregnated) type drills; speeds and feeds, abrasives, 
coolants. Surface finishes: sand blasting and acid 
etching techniques. Bending and forming procedures. 

Types and characteristics: Transparent, translucent, 
decorative, fiat, corrugated, moulded, extruded, 
rigid or flexible — colour. Working, handling and 
cleaning techniques. 



Metals 



Metal Types, 
Properties 



Metal Shapes 
and Sections 



Surface Finishes and 
Protective Coatings 



Composition and properties: aluminum, mild steel, 
stainless steel, bronze and copper, alloys, malleability. 
Expansion and contraction factors. Availabihty. 
Selection factors: strength, cost, durabihty, com- 
patability, workability; architectural features, 
engineering requirements. 

Sheet manufacturing processes: hot and cold rolled, 
smooth and textured surface. Standai;d sizes and 
size limitations. Thicknesses and gauges. 

— Formed sheet (brake-shape) : hand and power 
braking procedures; size, design and thickness 
limitations. Brake-Hne surface distortion. 

— Rolled sections: rolHng procedures. Design 
Hmitations. Economics vs. braking. 

— Extrusions: extruding process. Simple and port- 
hole extrusions. Permissible tolerances, relative 
strength and appearance. 



— Mechanical finishes: millfinish, belt finish (grit 
types) and polished. 

— Electrolytic and chemical finishes: acid etching. 
Anodizing ; clear and coloured finishes, skin thickness. 
Colour matching, surface hardeners. 

— Paint finishes: lacquer, baked enamel. Degrees of 
gloss. 



Reg. 34 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



197 



Item 



Column 1 



Course 



Column 2 



Subject 



Column 3 



Instruction To Be Given 



I 



— Ceramic and porcelain-enamel glaze finishes. 
Touch-up procedures. 

— Temporary surface protectors and removal 
techniques: lacquers (brush or spray), strippable 
plastic coatings (brush or spray), petroleum jelly, 
self-adhesive paper and tapes. 



Glazing Material 



Properties of Sealants 
and Glazing Materials 



Conventional Glazing 

Materials 

(Knife grade and tapes) 



Sealant Types 
(Gun grade, 
1-part and 2-part) 



Dry Glazing Materials 



Glazing Accessories 



Material Selection 



Joint Preparation 



Material and 
Applicator 
Preparation and 
Usage 



Adhesion. Cohesion. Elongation. Modulus of 
elasticity. Hardness. Ultimate hfe. Tensile and 
compression strength, curing. Safety precautions: 
fumes, toxic action, fire hazards. 

— Oleo-resin compounds : wood and metal sash putty. 
Synthetic resin compounds: wood and metal mastics. 

— Butyl-rubber compounds, pre-formed tape (includ- 
ing reinforced types). Polybutene mastics and 
polyisobutelene tapes. 

Oleo-resin compounds. Synthetic resin, polybutene, 
liquid polymer acrylic-base, butyl rubber and 
urethane compounds. Polysulphide, silicone rubber 
and acrylic types. Primers and surface conditioners. 
Back-up materials: styrofoam and foam rubber. 
Shelf life, pot life and curing time. 

Neoprene and vinyl roll-in splines and U-channel 
gaskets. Neoprene structural gaskets : spline or 
compression types. Felt, cork or rubber stripping. 

Types of setting blocks: lead, treated hardwood, 
neoprene and vinyl. Spacers: cork, neoprene and 
vinyl, treated hardwood. Glazing clips: spring wire, 
wedge, points. Special clips designed by manu- 
facturers. 

Governing factors : joint purpose and size ; type of 
materials to be joined; installation sequence and 
working conditions; exposure to air, moisture 
temperature and light rays ; economical factors ; 
expected joint movement ; architect's specifications. 

Architect's and manufacturer's instructions. Surface 
preparation methods: dry cleaning (wiping, wire 
brushing, scraping) Wet cleaning: cleaning solvents. 
Priming. Surface conditioning. Joint back-up. 

Job quantities. Manufacturer's packaging types. 
Mixing, stirring. Heating as required. Selection 
and preparation of applicators. Material application 
by appropriate procedures and techniques. Material 
compatability. Procedures for cleaning applicators 
and material surfaces. Cleaning solvent types and 
usage. Site clean-up. 



198 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 34 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Adhesives 



Adhesive selection and 
Usage 



Types and characteristics; glass veneer mastics, 
mirror mastics; epoxy, contact and plastic cements. 
Selection factors: material nature; air, moisture and 
temperature exposure; required holding power and 
resiliency. Application methods. 



10 



Glass Cements 



Cement Selection 



Types and characteristics: one-part and two-part 
glass cements. Pointing compounds. 
Selection factors: required holding power, resil- 
iency to accommodate movement, required water- 
proofing degree, clamping requirements and colour. 
Handling and preparation: storage, shelf Hfe, 
temperature and moisture damage. Mixing pro- 
cedures — importance of manufacturer's instruc- 
tions. Pot life. Safety precautions: fire and physi- 
cal hazards. Procedures and techniques for installa- 
tion of show cases, all-glass entrances and stuck- 
glass fronts. 



11 



Hardware and 

Operating 

Equipment 



Door Hinges and 
Pivots 



Locks and Operating 
Hardware 



Thresholds and 
Guards 



Door Stops 



Weathering 



Door Closers 
(Manual Types) 



(Automatic Types) 



Door Controls 



Sliding Door 
Hardware 



Types and characteristics: butt, gravity, double- 
acting, spring loaded, piano. Burglar proof types. 
Centre-hung, offset, intermediate pivots. 

Dead-locks, latch-locks. Flush-bolts. Electric 
strikes, panic devices (concealed or surface mounted) 
push and pull hardware: single and double acting. 

Centre-hung, offset and interlocking. Integral or 

surface mounted kick-plates. Buggy-bumpers and 

guard rails. Finger guards. 

Friction stays, drop arms, floor or wall mounted 

door stops; wind arrestors, chains, door co-ordina- 

tors. 

Mohair pile, door or frame mounted, fixed or ad- 
justable neoprene or rubber sweeps. Inter-locking 
types. Astragals. 

Overhead exposed (pot or stream-lined types) and 
overhead concealed (frame, or door mounted), floor 
concealed (single or double-acting, centre-hung, 

offset), balanced, revolving (manual or electric assist). 

Pneumatic, hydraulic, electric: swing, sliding, over- 
head or in-fioor mounted, single or multiple door 
operation ; power or spring closing action ; high or 
low pressure systems. 

Carpet and hardware controls: Photo-electric cells; 
radio-wave controls; pull-cord switches; control 
boxes. 

Patio door locks and pulls. Roller assemblies and 
nylon guides. Door bumpers. Fly-screen hardware. 



Reg. 34 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



199 



I 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Item 








Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Showcase Hardware 


Sliding door track and guides (roller, ball bearing, 
plastic). Locks: ratchet, friction and pin types. 
Finger pulls. Standards and shelf brackets. Coun- 
ter posts. 






Window and Sash 
Hardware 


Friction stays and hinges. Sash locks and balances. 
Manual remote controls. 






Miscellaneous 
Hardware 


Mirror clips. Rosettes, glass mitre clamps. Three- 
way clamps. 


12 


Installation 
Procedures 

Glazing 


Face Glazing 


Wood and metal sash: squaring and plumb checks. 

Cleaning. Priming. Bedding: face and edge clear- 
ance. Setting-blocks and spacers. Glass holding: 
use of clips, wedges and points. Facing and stroking 
off. Fining voids. Excess compound removal. 






Stop Glazing 


Wood and metal sash (fixed and opening) : squared, 
plumbed, cleaned, primed. Snap-on or screw-on 
stops. Bedding; use of compound, preformed tapes. 
Setting blocks and spacers. Edge clearance and bite 
on glass. Use of sealants for heel and needle bead 
neoprene or vinyl glazing strips. 






Dry Glazing 


Glazing-in rolled store front sections (glass to metal). 
Glazing-in extruded sections (neoprene or vinyl 
strip). Preparation of opening. Setting blocks at 
quarter points. Edge clearance and bite on glass. 
Application of stops (screw-on or snap-on). Applica- 
tion of neoprene or vinyl glazing strips. 






Gasket 
Glazing 


Checking of openings and sashes: importance of 
size and squareness tolerances. 

— Gasket types and application. Setting glass 
(arrissing, spatula and lubricant use). Placing of 
locking strips; use of locking tools and lubricants. 






Glass Veneers 


— Wall preparation : checks for firmness, flatness 
and plumb. Surface conditioning (dry wall). Layout. 

— Placing of supporting clips and retaining molding. 
Cutting, nipping, arrissing and back-chipping glass. 
Mastic application, backspacing and coverage. 
Setting glass veneer, pointing joints and cleaning. 






Mirrors 


— Wood or metal framed. Tamper-proof types. 

— Unframed: use of clips, rosettes, mirror-mastics, 
fasteners, mirror molding. Alignment procedures. 
Installation of mirror sliding doors, one-way mirrors 
and mirrorflex. 






Showcases 


Measuring. Types of joints. Use of clamps or 
moldings, adhesive and sealants. 



200 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 34 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Sliding Glass Doors 
(Unframed) 



Shelves 

Counter Partitions 

Table Tops 
Curtain Walls 



Types of glass and size limitations. Measuring 
procedures. Installation of tracks, finger pulls and 
locks. 



Types of glass and size limitations, 
and standards. 



Use of brackets 



Types of glass and size limitations. Use of counter 
posts. Speak-holes and covers, pay-holes and covers. 

Preparation of table top patterns. 

Planning and layout. Hoisting and placing glass on 
floors. Preparation of openings. Setting of vision 
and spandrel glass; use of swing stage. Conden- 
sation drainage and venting considerations. Applica- 
tion of pressure plates and stops. Finishing trims. 
Special hazards and safety precautions. 



13 



Installation 
Procedures 

Metal 



Store Fronts 
(Rolled sections and 
Brake-Shapes) 



Extruded Frames 
(Including 
Swing Doors) 



Non-operating 
Hardware 



Operating Hardware 
(Manual) 



(.Automatic) 



On-site layout procedures and techniques for: 
sill sections, head and side jambs, sash (full and half), 
division, corner and muntin bars, stops, caps, awning 
boxes and hoods, canopies. Installation and setting 
procedures. Protection methods. 

Job-site checks and measuring. Frdme layout and 
fabrication : use of jigs and templates. On-site 
assembly and frame installation. Hanging and 
glazing doors. Adjusting doors. 

Procedures for installation of: hinges, pivots, push 
and pull door hardware, locks, cylinders, flush-bolts 
and keepers. Panic hardware. Door hold-open de- 
vices, bumpers and wind-arrestors. Thresholds and 
kickplates. Door stops, astragals and finger-guards. 
Buggy bumpers and guardrails. Friction stays, sash 
locking devices and weathering^devices. Layout 
procedures and techniques: use of jigs and templates. 
Adjustment procedures. 

Procedures for installation of floor concealed (offset. 
centre-hung, single and double acting) closers. 
Overhead, (surface mounted or concealed, door or 
transom mounted) closers. Balanced and revolving, 
door types. Adjustment and maintenance pro- 
cedures. Layout procedures and techniques: Use 
of jigs and templates. 

Layout procedures and techniques for installation 
of electric, pneumatic and hydraulic types. Controls : 
carpet, photo-electric, radio wave, pull cord switches 
and control boxes. Adjustment and maintenance 
procedures ; use of test equipment. 



Reg. 34 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



201 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Course 



Subject 



Column 3 



Instruction To Be Given 



I 



Wall Facings 



Sliding Doors 

(Manual) 



Window Frames 



Curtain Wall 



Installation procedures for wall facings formed from: 
flat aluminum sheet, metal brake shapes, extruded 
or rolled sections. Solid or hollow panels. Plastic 
window walls and sky-lights. Protection methods. 

Installation procedures for residential patio and 
commercial store front doors. Tub and shower 
enclosures. Mirror sliding doors. Protection methods. 

Punched, strip (horizontal or vertical) (fixed or 
opening) (top. bottom or side hung), (inward or 
outward opening) or sliding (horizontal or vertical), 
insulated or non-insulated, inside or outside glazed 
(single or double) . Layout , assembly and installation 
procedures for: sills, drip deflectors, expansion joint 
covers, anchors, blocking, base frames, fasteners, 
expansion mullions, opening sashes and related hard- 
ware. Sealant application. 



Interpretation of plans and specifications; checking 
wall components with drawings and parts Hsts. 
Establishing lines, levels and grade marks; layout 
and presetting anchors. Preassembly of wall 
components. Installation and alignment of sections 
on lowest floor level. Installation and alignment 
of remaining wall grid. "Freezing" anchors (welding, 
etc.). Installing adaptors and flashings. Sealant 
application. Installation of insulation. Installation 
of partition closer panels. Final check of completed 
installation. 



14 



Installation 
Procedures 

Special Products 



Suspended Glass 
Fronts 



Stuck Glass Fronts 



Auto Glass 



Art Glass 



Layout procedures: installation of suspension 
brackets and perimeter framing. Hanging of glass. 
Patch fittings. Special door hardware and mounting 
procedures. Supporting glass fins. Installation of 
weathering. Sealing procedures. Protection methods. 
Replacement procedures. 

Layout procedures. Installation of concealed or 
exposed perimeter framing. Glass stiffeners (one 
side or both sides). Finishing glass joints. Pro- 
tection methods. Replacement procedures. 

Use of National Auto Glass Specifications Parts 
Book. Identification and selection of bent glass 
parts (toughened or laminated). Cutting and edge- 
work procedures for laminated flatstock to N.A.G. 
specifications. Damaged light removal procedures. 
Installation and sealing of new parts. Use of spe- 
cialized tools, lubricants and sealants. 

Designing; use of cartoons (patterns). Cutting, 
waxing-up, etching, painting, firing, procedures 



202 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 34 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Aquariums 


and techniques. Additional waxing-up and paint- 
ing. Staining. Leading-up and soldering. Cementing 
and fitting into base frame. Handling and installa- 
tion procedures. 

Procedures for construction of framed and all-glass 
types. Glass selection, cutting and edgework. 
Selection- of non-toxic cements and sealants. Water 
pressure and weight considerations. Mechanical 
blocking of glass in frames. 


15 


Planning 
Procedures 


Job Specifications 
and changes 

Job Planning 
Production Principles 


Reading and interpretation; work included, work 
excluded. Type and quahty of materials, finishes 
and workmanship called for. ResponsibiHty for 
protection, cleaning, guarantees. Specific installa- 
tion instructions. General conditions. Modifications 
to job specifications by bulletins and addendas, 
change notices and change orders. 

Manpower, tool and equipment requirements. 
Material and equipment deliveries and storage. 
On-site distribution of materials. Electric power 
requirements. Job allocation. Co-ordination with 
other trades through General Contractor. 

Job break-down into separate operations for spe- 
cialization. Elimination of unproduative motion. 



O. Reg. 309/70, Sched. 



Schedule 2 

GLAZIER AND METAL MECHANIC 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


General Trade 
Practice 


General 


Safety rules and removal of all safety hazards. 
Use of hand and power tools and equipment, glass 
handling devices and equipment, measuring and 
marking tools, fastening devices. Benchwork and 
cutting-table operations. (As detailed in Schedule 1). 



Reg. 34 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



203 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Work Instruction and Experience 



Glass 



Glass Facts 



Glass Function and 
Recognition 



Glass Preparation 



Plastics 



Familiarization with glass composition and proper- 
ties. Maximum glass sizes. Manufacturing pro- 
cesses. 

— Transparent, translucent and opal glasses. Special 
purpose types: wired, laminated, heat absorbing, 
heat reflecting, and lead-plate glasses. Prismatic 
glass. Cladding (Spandrel) glasses. Miscellaneous 
glasses; factory sealed units, veneer and structural 
glasses, blocks and channels, corrugated glass. 
Mirrors: plate, sheet and transparent one-way types. 

Familiarization with cutting tolerances. Chipping 
and nipping, notching. Edgework: grinding, polish- 
ing, mitering, levelHng. Glass drilling, sand blasting 
and etching. Bending and forming techniques. 

Familiarization with types, characteristics and 
applications. Working, handling and cleaning 
operations. 



Metals 



Metal Types, 
Properties 



Metal Shapes and 
Sections 



Surface Finishes and 
Protective Coatings 



Familiarization with characteristics and properties: 
aluminum, mild steel, stainless steels, bronze and 
copper, alloys. Selection factors. 

Familiarization with : sheet metal manufacturing 
processes: standard sizes and size limitations. 
Thicknesses and gauges. 

— Formed sheet (brake-shape): size, design and 
thickness limitations. Economics vs. braking. 

— Extrusions: permissible tolerances, relative 
strength and appearance. 

Familiarization with : mechanical finishes, 

— Electrolytic and chemical finishes: Colour match- 
ing, surface hardeners. 

— Paint finishes : lacquer and baked enamel. 

— Ceramic and porcelain-enamel glaze finishes. 
Touch-up procedures. 

— Temporary surface protectors and removal 
techniques. 



Glazing Materials 



Sealants and Glazing 
Materials 

Conventional Glazing 

Materials 

(Knife grade and tapes) 



Sealant Types 

(Gun grade, 1-part and 

2-part) 



Properties. Safety precautions: fumes, toxic action, 
fire hazards. 

— Oleo-resin compounds: wood and metal sash 
putty. Synthetic resin compounds: wood and metal 
mastics. 

— Butyl-rubber compounds: preformed tape (in- 
cluding reinforced types) . Polybutene mastics and 
polyisobutelene tapes. 

Oleo-resin compounds. Synthetic resin, polybutene, 
liquid polymer acrylic-base, butyl rubber and ure- 
thane compounds. Polysulphide, silicone rubber and 



204 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 34 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Glazing Accessories 


acrylic types. Primers and surface conditioners. 
Back-up materials. Shelf life, pot life and curing 
time. Dry-glazing materials; roll-in splines and 
U-channel gaskets. Structural gaskets. Stripping. 

Setting blocks. Spacers. Glazing clips. Special pur- 
pose clips. 


4 




Joint Preparation 

Material Selection 
Preparation and 
Application 


Surface preparation: dry cleaning, or wet cleaning. 
Priming. Surface conditioning. Joint back-up. 

Selection factors: mixing, stirring. Heating as 
required. Selection and preparation of applicators. 
Material application. Cleaning applicators and 
material surfaces. Site clean-up. 


5 


Adhesives 


Adhesive Selection and 
Usage 


Characteristics; glass veneer mastics, mirror mastics; 
epoxy , contact and plastic cements. Selection factors ; 
application methods. 


6 


Glass Cements 


Cement Selection 


Familiarization with : one-part and two-part glass 
cements. Pointing compounds. Selection factors. 
Handling and mixing procedures. Pot life. Safety 
precautions: fire and physical hazards. Installation 
of showcases, all-glass entrances and stuck-glass 
fronts. 


7 


Hardware and 

Operating 

Equipment 


Door Hardware 

Showcase Hardware 

Window and Sash 
Hardware 

Miscellaneous 
Hardware 


Familiarization with types and characteristics: door 
hinges and pivots. Locks and operating hardware. 
Thresholds and guards. Kick-plates. Buggy-bumpers 
and guard rails. Finger guards. Door stops. Wind 
arrestors, chains, door co-ordinators. Weathering. 
Astragals. Door closers : (manual types) including 
balanced, revolving (manual or electric assist) ; 
automatic types: pneumatic, hydraulic, electric, 
power or spring closing action ; high or low pressure 
systems. Door controls: carpet and hardware con- 
trols: Photo-electric cells; radiowave controls; pull- 
cord switches; control boxes. Sliding door hardware. 
Door locks and bumpers . Fly-screen hardware. 

Sliding door track and guides. Locks. Finger pulls. 
Standards and shelf brackets. Counter posts. 

Friction stays and hinges. Sash locks and balances. 
Manual remote controls. 

Mirror clips. Rosettes, glass mitre clamps. Three- 
way clamps. 


8 


Installation 
Procedures 
Glazing 


Face Glazing 


Wood and metal >ash ; scjuaring and plumb checks. 
Cleaning. Priming. Bedding; face and edge clearance. 
Setting-blocks and spacers. Glass holding: use of 



Reg. 34 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



205 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Item 








Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 








clips, wedges and points. Facing and stroking off. 
Filling voids. Excess compound removal. 






Stop Glazing 


Wood and metal sash (fixed and opening) : squaring 
and plumb checks. Cleaning. Priming. Applica- 
tion of snap-on or screw-on stops. Bedding; use of 
compound, preformed tapes. Setting blocks and 
spacers. Sealing heel and needle bead neoprene or 
vinyl glazing strips. 






Dry Glazing 


Glazing-in rolled store front sections (glass to metal). 
Glazing-in extruded sections (neoprene or vinyl strip). 
Preparation of opening. Setting blocks. Applica- 
tion of stops (screw-on or snap-on). Application of 
glazing strips. 






Gasket Glazing 


Checking openings and sashes. 

— Gasket selection. Setting glass. Placing locking 

strips. 






Glass Veneers 


— Wall preparation and checking. Surface condition- 
in (dry wall). Layout. 

— Placing supporting clips and retaining moldings. 
Cutting, nipping, arrissing and back-chipping glass. 
Mastic application, backspacing and coverage. 
Setting glass veneer, pointing joints and cleaning. 


8 


Installation 
Procedures 
Glazing 


Mirrors 


Alignment and installation of wood or metal framed, 
tamper-proof or unframed types ; mirror sliding doors, 
one-way mirrors and mirrorfiex. 






Showcases 


Measuring and installation. Use of clamps or mold- 
ings, adhesives and sealants. 






Sliding Glass Doors 
(Un framed) 


Measuring and installation of tracks, finger pulls and 
locks. 






Shelves 


Use of brackets and standards. Size limitations. 






Counter Partitions 


Use of counter posts. Provision of speak-holes and 
covers, pay-holes and covers. 






Table Tops 


Measuring and pattern making. 






Curtain Walls 


Planning and layout. Hoisting and placing glass on 
floors. Preparation of openings. Setting vision and 
spandrel glass; use of swing-stage. Condensation 
drainage and venting. Application of pressure plates, 
stops, and finishing trims. 



206 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 34 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Item 








Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


9 


Installation 
Procedures 
Metal 


Store Fronts 
(Rolled sections and 
Brake Shapes) 


On-site layout of sill sections, head and side jambs, 
sash (full and half), division, corner and muntin bars. 
Stops, caps, awning boxes and hoods, canopies. 
Installation, setting and protection. 






Extruded Frames 
(Including Swinging 
Doors) 


Job-site checks and measuring. Frame layout and 
fabrication: jig and template use. On-site assembly 
and frame installation. Hanging, glazing and ad- 
justing doors. 






Non-operating 
Hardware 


Installation of hinges, pivots, push and pull door 
hardware, locks, cylinders, flush-bolts and keepers. 
Panic hardware. Door hold-open devices, bumpers 
and wind-arrestors. Thresholds and kick-plates. 
Door stops, astragals and finger guards. Buggy- 
bumpers and guardrails. Friction stays, sash locking 
devices and weathering devices. Layout: use of jigs 
and templates. Final adjustment. 






Operating Hardware 
(Manual) 


Layout and installation of floor concealed (offset, 
centre-hung, single and double acting closers), over- 
head (surface mounted or concealed, door or transom 
mounted) closers. Balanced and revolving door types. 
Use of jigs and templates. Final adjustments. 






(Automatic) 


Layout and installation of electric pneumatic and 
hydraulic types. Controls: carpet, photo-electric, 
radio wave, pull-cord switches and control boxes. 
Final adjustments: use of test equipment. 






Wall Facings 


Installation and protection of wall facings formed 
from flat aluminum sheet, metal brake shapes, ex- 
truded or rolled sections. Solid or hollow panels. 
Plastic window walls and sky-lights. 






Sliding Doors 
(Manual) 


Installation and protection of residential patio and 
commercial store front doors. Tub and shower en- 
closures. Mirror sliding doors. 






Window Frames 


Punched, strip (horizontal or vertical) (fixed or 
opening) (top, bottom or side hung), (inward or 
outward opening) or sliding (horizontal or vertical), 
insulated or non-insulated, inside or outside glazed 
(single or double). Layout, assembly and instal- 
lation of sills, drip deflectors, expansion joint covers, 
anchors, blocking, base frames, fasteners, expansion 
mullions, opening sashes and related hardware. 
Sealant application. 




__. _ 


Curtain Wall 


Checking wall components. Establishing lines, levels 
and grade marks; layout and presetting anchors. 
Preassembly of wall components. Installation and 



Reg. 34 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



207 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column ,^ 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 








alignment of wall grid. "Freezing" anchors (welding, 
etc.). Installing adaptors and flashings. Sealant 
application. Installation of insulation and partition 
closer panels. Completed installation check. 


10 


Installation 
Procedures 

—Special 
Products 


Suspended Glass 
Fronts 

Stuck Glass Fronts 

Auto Glass 

Art Glass 
Aquariums 


Layout and installation of suspension brackets and 
perimeter framing. Hanging glass. Patch fittings. 
Special door hardware mounting. Supporting glass 
fins. Installation of weathering. Sealing operations. 
Replacement operations. 

Layout and installation of concealed or exposed peri- 
meter framing. Glass stiffeners (one side or both 
sides). Finishing glass joints. Protection. Replace- 
ment operations. 

Identification and selection of glass parts (toughened 
or laminated). Cutting and edgework of laminated 
flat-stock to National Auto Glass specifications. 
Damaged light removal. Installation and sealing of 
new parts. 

Designing. Cutting, waxing-up etching, painting, 
firing operations. Additional waxing-up and painting. 
Staining. Leading-up and soldering. Cementing and 
fitting into base frame. Handling and installation. 

Construction of framed and all-glass types. Glass 
selection, cutting and edgework. Use of non-toxic 
cements and sealants. Blocking glass in frames. 



O. Reg. 309/70, Sched. 2. 



208 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 35 



REGULATION 35 



under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



HAIRDRESSERS 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of a hair- 
dresser ; 

(6) "hairdresser" means a person who, in the 
course of hairdressing, 

(i) tints, bleaches or dyes hair, 

(ii) shampoos hair and scalp, 

(iii) gives hair or scalp treatments, 

(iv) cleans or dresses artificial hair pieces, 

(v) cuts or trims hair, 

(vi) shapes, colours, or treats eyebrows 
or eyelashes, 

(vii) curls or waves hair by any means, 

(viii) combs or brushes hair, and 

(ix) performs any other operation with 
respect to dressing hair to obtain an 
intended effect or according to a 
particular style, 

and who holds himself out to the public 
as a hairdresser. O. Reg. 250/69, s. 1. 

2. The trade of a hairdresser is designated as a 
certified trade for the purposes of the Act. O. Reg. 
250/69. s. 2. 

3. No person shall carry on the certified trade in 
a shop that is represented to the public as a barber 
shop. O. Reg. 250/69, s. 3. 

4. — (1) An apprentice training program for the 
certified trade is established and shall consist of, 

(a) training and instruction at full-time educa- 
tional day classes provided at a College of 
Applied Arts and Technology or in courses 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto, in the subjects con- 
tained in Schedule 1 ; and 

(6) practical training and instruction provided 
by an employer of the apprentice in the 
subjects contained in Schedule 2. 



(2) An apprentice shall complete three periods of 
training and instruction of 1500 hours per period. 
O. Reg. 250/69, s. 4. 

5. — ( 1 ) A graduate student of a hairdressing school 
to which Regulation 36 of Revised Regulations of 
Ontario, 1970 applies shall be issued an interim 
certificate of qualification in the certified trade upon 
successfully passing an examination prescribed by 
the Director in the subjects contained in schedules 
1 and 2. 

(2) A student in a school under the jurisdiction of 
the Department of Education who has successfully 
completed Grade 9 or has such other academic 
qualification that, in the opinion of the Director, is 
equivalent thereto, and has completed a course 
approved by the Director of at least 1500 hours 
of training and instruction in the subjects contained 
in schedules 1 and 2, shall be issued an interim 
certificate of quaUfication in the certified trade upon 
successfully passing an examination prescribed by 
the Director in those subjects. 

(3) An interim certificate of quaUfication is valid 
for a period of twenty-four months from the date on 
which it is issued, but the certificate may be re- 
newed for such period of time as the Director 
determines upon the holder passing an examination 
prescribed by the Director. 

(4) An appHcation for an interim certificate of 
qualification or a renewal thereof shall be made in 
Form 5 of Regulation 33 of Revised Regulations of 
Ontario, 1970 and shall be accompanied by a fee 
of $5. 

(5) The holder of an interim certificate of qualifi- 
cation may apply for a certificate of qualification 
that may be issued without examination if he 
satisfies the Director that he has been employed full- 
time in the certified trade for a period of not less 
than twelve months. 



(6) No holder of an interim certificate of qualifica- 
tion shall be employed in the certified trade unless at 
least one holder of a certificate of quaHfication is 
employed by the same employer and under whose 
supervision a holder of an interim certificate of 
qualification works. 

(7) The ratio of holders of interim certificates of 
qualification to the ratio of holders of certificates of 
qualification employed by the same employer shall 
not exceed three to one. O. Reg. 250/69, s. 5. 



Reg. 35 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



209 



6. No person shall become an apprentice in the 
certified trade unless he has successfully completed 
Grade 9 in Ontario or has such other academic 
qualification that, in the opinion of the Director, 
is equivalent thereto. O. Reg. 250/69, s. 6. 

7. Any person who, 

(a) applies in the prescribed form for appren- 
ticeship in the certified trade ; and 

(6) becomes an apprentice in the certified trade 
within three months after commencing to 
work in that trade, 

is exempt from subsection 2 of section 10 of the Act. 
O. Reg. 250/69, s. 7. 

8. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the 
certified trade whether for his regular daily hours 
or for hours in excess of his daily hours shall not 
be less than. 



(a) 50 per cent during the first period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 

{b) 70 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; and 

(c) 90 per cent during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction, 

of the average rate of wages or its equivalent for 
journeymen employed by the employer in the cer- 
tified trade or, where the employer is the only 
journeyman employed, of the average rate of wages 
or its equivalent for journeymen in the area. O. 
Reg. 250/69, s. 8. 

9. The subjects of examination for a certificate of 
qualification are the subjects contained in schedules 
1 and 2. O. Reg. 250/69, s. 9. 

10. A certificate of quahfication in the certified 
trade expires on the 30th day of April in each 
year. O. Reg. 250/69, s. 10. 



Schedule 1 

HAIRDRESSER 
In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Language and 
Communication 


Composition 
Business Writing 


Vocabulary of Hairdressing trade; Grammar, sen- 
tence and paragraph structure. Written and oral 
composition. 

Sample business letters; format tone and layout. 
Report writing. 


2 


Mathematics 
(Trade Related) 


Business 
Mathematics 


Fractions, decimals, percentage, interest and dis- 
count. Ratio and proportion. 

Fundamental operations : basic bookkeeping, balance 
sheets, financial statements. Retailing, insurance, 
taxes, licensing, leases. 


3 


Chemistry 


Basics 

Cosmetics 
(Trade Related) 


Introduction: chemistry in the Hairdressing salon, 
Matter; physical and chemical changes. Elements, 
compounds, mixtures; properties, characteristics. 
Analysis, synthesis. Acids, bases and salts; source, 
preparation, properties, uses, pH factor. Chemistry 
of water; hard and soft water, purification. 

Description, chemical properties and applications; 
cosmetics, dyes, tints, disinfectants, chemical sterili- 
zers. Powders, emulsions, ointments, astringent 
soaps. Types of solutions and preparation. 



210 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 35 



Column 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Hairdressing 
Fundamentals 



Safety 



History of 
Hairdressing 



Bacteriology 



Sterilization and 
Sanitizing 



Personal Hygiene 



Hairdressing Salon 
Hygiene 



Safety rules and regulations; safe operating pro- 
cedures. First aid. Fire prevention. Use and main- 
tenance of fire-fighting equipment. Handling and 
storage of flammable, poisonous or caustic materials. 
Use of rubber gloves and protective creams for 
handling chemicals, dyes, tints and bleaches. Safe 
operation of electrical equipment. Eye protection 
for light therapy. Care and handling of cutting 
tools. Good housekeeping. 

Egyptian, Greek and Roman hair fashions. History 
of permanent waving: difficulties and developments. 
Hair bleaching and dyeing not new. History of 
cosmetics, perfume and manicuring. 

Classification and description of bacteria. Non- 
pathogenic and pathogenic organisms. Bacterial 
growth and reproduction, movement, body infection 
methods, contagion sources. Other infectious agents ; 
viruses, parasites, fungi. Carriers. Control and 
destruction of bacteria. 

Importance. Physical agents; use of boiling or 
steaming, dry heat, ultra-violet rays. Chemical 
sanitizing agents; antiseptics, disinfectants, vapours 
(fumigants). Requirements. Applications. Solu- 
tion types; mixing and usage. Storage of sterilized 
or sanitized implements and accessories. 

Importance of good health. Balanced diet and exer- 
cise. Healthy mental outlook. Confidence. Good 
posture. Combatting fatigue. Personal cleanliness; 
habits. Appearance; uniform, shoes, speech. Phy- 
sical examinations. Personality. 

Applicable government health regulations. Infec- 
tious diseases: patron and hairdresser requirements. 
Salon interior cleanliness. Waste storage and re- 
moval. Lighting, plumbing, heating, ventilation and 
water requirements. Salon usage. Rest rooms. 
Correct towel use and storage. Sanitizing and 
storage of implements and accessories. Application 
and storage of lotions, ointments, creams, powders; 
use of spatulas and cotton pledgets. Elimination of 
rodents, flies and insects. Restrictions on pets. 



Basic Anatomy 
and Physiology 



Cells 

Digestive System 
Circulatory System 



Structure, cell growth, reproduction, metabolism, 
tissues. 

The stomach ; digestion process, enzyme action. 

Circulatory (vascular) system; description and func- 
tion of blood-vascular and lymphatic systems. Ar- 
teries and veins of the head, face, neck and hands. 
The endocrine systeni. 



I 



Reg. 35 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



211 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Bone Structure 


Bone composition. Types. Nutrition. Cranial, 
facial, hyoid and cervical bones: bones of the hands. 
Numbers and function. 






Muscular System 


Muscle tissue; voluntary, involuntary and cardiac. 
Muscle origin, insertion, and characteristics. Stimu- 
lation methods. Muscles of the head, face, neck and 
hands. 






Nervous System 


Nerves and nerve cells ; nerve types. Division of the 
nervous system. Nerve reflex. Nerve fatigue; 
stimulation methods. Nerves of the head, face, neck 
and hands. 






Excretory System 


Sudoriferous (sweat) glands and sebaceous (oil) 
glands. 






Skin and 
Appendages 


Skin health and appearance. Skin thickness. Epi- 
dermis and dermis. Subcutaneous tissue. Skin 
nourishment. Nerves of the skin. Skin elasticity, 
colour. 






Hair 


Composition; hair root and hair shaft. Hair root 
structure, follicles, distribution, growth, replace- 
ment, hfe and density, colour, greying. Hair analy- 
sis, texture, porosity, condition and elasticity. 






Hair, Scalp and 
Skin Disorders 


Definitions and terminology ; recognition of infection 
and contagious skin disorders. Primary and secon- 
dary lesions. Dandruff, skin inflammations, alo- 
pecia. Contagious disorders; ringworm, scabies. 
Non-contagious skin disorders. Superfluous hair. 






Electrical Therapy 
and Treatments 


Basic electricity. Conductors, insulators, circuits. 
Alternating and direct current. Converters and rec- 
tifiers. Fuses. Safety precautions. High fre- 
quency current application for facial and scalp 
treatment ; Tesla current (violet ray) ; physiological 
effects. Facial and scalp electrodes. Application 
procedures and safety precautions; direct surface 
application and indirect application. 






Light therapy 


Characteristics and properties: ultra-violet, infra-red 
and visible light rays. Therapeutic lamp types; 
beneficial effects. Safety precautions in use. 






Massage 


Physiological effects and benefits of facial and scalp 
massage. Basic manipulations: effleurage (stroking), 
petrissage (kneading), friction (deep rubbing), per- 
cussion (tapping, hacking, slapping), vibration. 
Correct use and application of electrical appliances; 
vibrators, high-frequency applicators, therapeutic 
lamps. 



212 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 35 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


6 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Facial 
Treatments 
(Theory and 
Demonstration) 


Preliminaries 
Giving Facials 

Facial Make-Up 


Analysis of patron's skin condition. Determination 
of type of facial and equipment required. Arrange- 
ment of supplies. Seating patron; hnen and towel 
adjustment, hair protection. Sanitizing hands. 

Procedures and techniques for plain, vibratory, dry 
skin, oily skin and acne facials. Clay packs and hot 
oil masks ; commercial face packs and masks. Muscle 
toning. Massage movements and manipulations. 
Correct vibrator use and techniques. Use and appli- 
cation of steam towels, creams, lotions, oils, solutions, 
astringents, tonics, powders. Blackhead removal 
techniques. Use of dermal lights, infra-red lamps 
and high frequency (Tesla) current. Patron eye 
protection. Clean-up procedures. Used towels and 
waste disposal. Container sealing and storage. 
Sanitizing implements and hands. 

Types, characteristics and apphcation of make-up 
cosmetics. Face types and apphcable make-up. 
Corrective make-up techniques. Eyebrow arching; 
corrections. 


7 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Scalp and Hair 
Treatments 
(Theory and 
Demonstration) 


Fundamentals 
Scalp Treatments 


Benefits of scalp massage. Scalp massage procedures ; 
positions and massage movements, muscles, nerves 
and arteries affected. 

Treatments and procedures for: normal scalp and 
hair, dry scalp, oily scalp, dandruff, alopecia. Cor- 
rective hair treatments. Types and application of 
shampoos, scalp ointments and creams, vegetable 
oils, astringents, hair tonics. Use and apphcation of 
vibrators, red dermal lights, infra-red lamps, ultra- 
violet rays, high frequency (Tesla) current. Use of 
steamers, heating caps and hair dryers. Safety pre- 
cautions; eye protection, use of alcohol base hair 
tonics. Sterihzation and sanitizing requirements. 


8 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Haircutting 


Fundamentals 

Implements and 
Accessories 

Elements of 
Correct Haircutting 


Haircutting : the foundation for hair styles : relation- 
ship to head and facial contours and neckline. Hair 
texture and condition. 

Types and characteristics: haircutting and thinning 
shears, razors, clippers, combs, brushes. Care and 
correct usage. Manipulation and co-ordination. 
Sanitizing and storage procedures. 

Seating and draping patron. Analysis of head and 
facial contours, neckline, hair texture and condition. 
Selection of hair style, implements and procedures. 
Combing and brushing hair. Sectioning, thinning, 
shingling, tapering. Razor cutting and shear cutting. 
Natural and artificial neckhnes: shaping, cleaning 
and cHpping. Split hair end treatments. 



Reg. 35 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



213 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


9 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Shampoos 


Fundamentals 

Rinses 

Preliminaries 

Shampooing 


Importance of clean, healthy hair and scalp condi- 
tion. Hair brushing. Shampoo types, characteris- 
tics and appHcation. Water temperature. Sham- 
pooing bleached hair. Massage. Towel drying. 
Safety precautions for flammable shampoo liquids. 
Dry cleaning hair pieces. 

Types, purpose, characteristics and application. 
Commercial colour rinses. 

Sanitizing hands — seating and draping patron. 
Preparing and analyzing hair and scalp condition. 
Suitable shamjxjo selection. Arrangements of sup- 
plies and equipment. Brushing hair. 

Procedures and techniques for all shampoo types. 
Scalp massage and manipulations. Rinsing pro- 
cedures. Use of correct rinse. 


10 


Hairdressing 
Practice 


Fundamentals 
Bleaching 


The bleaching process. Possible hair damage: pre- 
bleaching hair and scalp condition analysis impor- 
tance. Commercial hair bleach, hydrogen peroxide; 
classification and action. Choice of bleach: appli- 
cation techniques, equipment, implements and sup- 
phes. 

Patron preparation. Analysis and requirements of 
hair and scalp condition. Preparation of bleach and 
application : timing, colour development and testing. 
Virgin bleaches. Retouching. Reconditioning 
over-bleached hair. Rinsing and finishing. Com- 
pletion of record cards. Equipment and implement 
cleaning and sanitizing. 


11 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Hair Colouring 


Fundamentals 

Colouring and 
Tinting 


Temporary and permanent hair colourings: all 
aspects and definitions. Commercial hair colouring 
and tinting classification and action. 

Hair dye poisoning symptoms: patch or predisposi- 
tion skin tests. Hair tint records. Hair and scalp 
condition requirements: colour selection. Tinting 
materials and supplies: preparation and application 
techniques. 

Patron preparation. Skin predisposition test results 
and required action. Hair and scalp analysis: re- 
quired action or pretreatment. Colour selection: 
test strand development and results. Rinsing and 
finishing. Completing records. Equipment and 
implement cleaning and sanitizing. 


12 


Hairdressing 
Practice 


Fundamentals 


Finger and comb manipulation techniques. Hair 
preparation. Use of waving lotions. Right-going 
and left-going wave movements. Matching and 
connecting waves. 



214 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 35 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 




Finger Waving 


Giving Finger Waves 


Patron preparation. Hair shampooing or wetting, 
parting, combing and styling. Waving lotion appli- 
cation and distribution. Shaping the finger wave: 
hair parting, forming pin curls, plain waving, skip 
waving; reverse, cascade and ridge curls. Patron 
protection under dryer. 


13 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Permanent 
Waving 


Fundamentals 

Cold Waving 
Thermal Waving 


The cold wave process: waving solution and neu- 
trahzer action, curling rods. Prewaving hair analy- 
sis: elasticity, porosity, texture and condition. 
Effects of previous hair damage and corrective treat- 
ments. Hair straightening techniques. Test curl 
purpose and processing: processing time factors. 
Importance of recording information. Protective 
measures for hairdresser and patron. 

Patron preparation. Prewave hair analysis. Hair 
preparation. Blocking or sectioning, winding or 
wrapping, test curls, applying waving solution and 
processing, neutrahzing, unwinding, towel drying. 
Cold wave completion: setting, drying and styhng. 
Finishing procedures. Maintaining patron records. 

Hair pressing: heated comb method. Thermal roller 
curling: using heated bouffant iron. 


14 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Hair Styling 


Fundamentals 
Styling 


Primary importance of healthy hair condition, 
cutting and shaping, permanent waving and pin 
curling. Types of face and profiles: artistry and 
complimentary styling, corrective styles. 

Procedures and techniques for pin curls, roller curls, 
hair parting. Top, side and back patterns and comb- 
outs: basic settings and comb-outs. Hair spray use. 
Back combing and back brushing. Hair piece use 
and arrangements. 


15 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Manicuring 


Fundamentals 
Manicures 


Nail structure: parts and growth, shapes. Nail dis- 
orders, irregularities and diseases; appropriate ac- 
tion. Types and application of manicuring imple- 
ments, equipment, cosmetics and materials. Table 
and tray preparation. Sterilization and sanitizing 
procedures. 

Patron preparation. Procedures for all types of 
manicures. Hand massage. Special problems and 
precautions. 


16 


Hairdressing 

Salon 

Management 


Operations 


Business organization. Types of ownership. Busi- 
ness law — financial of)erations. Location selection. 
Salon equipment, supplies, records. Advertising 
methods and mediums. Salesmanship. Applicable 
regulations for operators, hairdressers and appren- 
tices. 



Reg. 35 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



215 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Business Ethics 


Public relations. Ethical conduct and business deal- 
ings in relation to patron, employer and coworkers. 
Punctuality. 



O. Reg. 250/69. Sched. 1 



Schedule 2 
HAIRDRESSER 

Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


Hairdressing 
Fundamentals 
(as detailed in 
Schedule 1) 


Safety 

Bacteriology 

Personal Hygiene 

Hairdressing Salon 
Hygiene 


Safety rules and regulations. Safe operating pro- 
cedures. First aid treatment. Fire prevention. 
Handhng and storage of flammable, poisonous or 
caustic materials. Dermatitis prevention. Safe 
operation of electrical equipment. Care and handling 
of cutting implements. Good housekeeping. 

Recognition and classification of bacteriological in- 
fections. FamiHarization with body infection meth- 
ods and contagion sources, control and destruction 
of bacteria. 

Importance of good health. Mental outlook. Pos- 
ture. Confidence. Personal cleanliness. Appear- 
ance. Familiarization with physical examination 
requirements. 

Familiarization with applicable government health 
regulations. Infectious diseases; patron and hair- 
dresser requirements. Salon interior cleanhness; 
waste storage and removal. Lighting, heating, 
plumbing and ventilation requirements. Water 
requirements. Rest rooms. Salon usage. Towel 
usage and storage. Sterilization and sanitizing 
methods and agents. Sterilization or sanitizing of 
implements and accessories and storage after use. 
Apphcation and storage of lotions, ointments, creams 
and powders. 



216 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 35 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


2 


Basic Anatomy 
and Physiology 


Body Systems 

Hair, Scalp and 
Skin Disorders 

Electrical Therapy 
and Treatments 

Light Therapy 
Massage 


Famiharization with characteristics and function of 
body cells — digestive, excretory, circulatory, endo- 
crine, muscular and nervous systems — bone struc- 
tures — skin and appendages — in relation to the 
head, face, neck and hands. 

Famiharization with hair composition, structure and 
analysis. Recognition of infection, contagious and 
non-contagious disorders. Familiarization with 
required action or remedial treatment, personal and 
public health safeguards. 

Famiharization with basic electrical principles and 
applications. High frequency (Tesla) current appli- 
cations for facial and scalp treatment by direct sur- 
face or indirect methods. 

Famiharization with safety precautions, protective 
measures. 

Use of ultra-violet, infra-red rays and dermal lamps. 
Famiharization with safety precautions and pro- 
tective measures. 

Familiarization with basic manipulations and effects. 
Use and apphcation of electric vibrators, high fre- 
quency applicators, therapeutic lamps. 


3 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Facial 
Treatments 


Preliminaries 
Facials 

Facial Make-Up 


Analysis of patron's skin condition. Determination 
of type of facial and equipment required. Arrange- 
ment of supplies. Preparing patron : hair protection. 
Sanitizing hands. 

Giving facials for plain, vibratory, dry skin, oily skin 
and acne. Massage and manipulations. Vibrator 
use. Blackhead removal. Use of therapeutic lamps 
and high frequency (Tesla) current. Safety pre- 
cautions. Clean up procedures. Sanitizing imple- 
ments and hands after facials. 

Application of make-up cosmetics: face types and 
applicable make-up, corrective make-up. Eyebrow 
arching. 


4 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Scalp and Hair 
Treatments 


Giving Treatments 


Recognition of scalp diseases or disorders ; required 
action or corrective hair treatments. Scalp massage. 
Application of vibrators, dermal lights, infra-red 
lamps, ultra-violet rays, high frequency (Tesla) 
current. Use of steamers, heating caps and hair 
dryers. Sterilization and sanitizing procedures after 
treatments. 


5 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Hair Cutting 


Preliminaries 


Familiarization with modern hair styling and coif- 
fures. Patron preparation. Analysis of head and 
facial contours, neckline, hair texture and condition. 
Selection of complimentary hair styling,* implements 
and procedures. 



Reg. 35 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



217 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Haircuts 


Combing and brushing hair. Sectioning, thinning, 
shinghng, tapering. Razpr cutting and shear cutting. 
Shaping, cleaning and clipping natural and artificial 
neckhnes. Split hair end treatments. Finishing: 
clean-up and sanitizing procedures. 


6 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Shampoos 


Preliminaries 
Shampooing 


Patron preparation. Hair and scalp condition 
analysis: suitable shampoo selection. Arrangement 
of towels, supplies. Brushing hair when required. 

Application of required shampoo. Shampooing 
bleached hair. Scalp massage and manipulations. 
Rinsing. Use of correct rinse. Drying and finishing. 
Dry cleaning hair pieces. 


7- 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Hair Bleaching 


Bleaching 


Patron preparation. Analysis of hair and scalp con- 
dition. Preparation of bleach and application, 
timing, colour development and testing. Virgin 
bleaches. Retouching. Reconditioning over- 
bleached hair. Rinsing and finishing. Drying and 
setting. Completing records. Equipment and im- 
plement cleaning and sanitizing. 


8 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Hair Colouring 


Colouring and 
Tinting 


Patron preparation. Skin predisposition test results 
and required action. Hair, and scalp analysis: re- 
quired action or pretreatment. Colour selection: 
test strand development and results. Blending, dye- 
ing back and toning-down. Finishing : final shampoos 
and rinsing, drying and setting. Completing records. 
Equipment and implement cleaning and sanitizing. 


9 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Finger Waving 


Giving Finger Waves 


Patron preparation. Hair shampooing or wetting, 
parting, combing and styling. Waving lotion appli- 
cation. Shaping the finger wave: hair parting, form- 
ing pin curls, plain waving, skip waving; reverse, 
cascade and ridge curls. Completing finger waves. 
Drying. 


10 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Permanent 
Waving 


Cold Waving 
Thermal Waving 


Patron preparation. Prewave hair analysis. Hair 
preparation. Blocking or sectioning, winding or 
wrapping, applying waving solution and processing, 
neutraHzing, unwinding, towel drying. Cold wave 
completion. Finishing. Maintaining patron records. 

Hair pressing and thermal roller curhng. 


11 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Hair Styling 


Styling 


FamiHarization with artistry and complimentary 
styling, corrective styles for types of faces and pro- 
files. Forming pin curls, roller curls, hair parting: 
comb and brush styling. Top, side and back pat- 
terns and comb-outs: basic settings and comb-outs. 
Hair piece use and arrangements. Hair spray use. 
Back-combing and back brushing. 



218 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 35 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


12 


Hairdressing 
Practice 

Manicuring 


Giving Manicures 


Patron preparation. Table and tray preparation; 
sterilization and sanitizing procedures. Recognition 
of nail disorders, irregularities, diseases and appro- 
priate action. Hand massage. 


13 


Hairdressing 

Salon 

Management 


Responsibilities 
Conduct 


Familiarization with applicable government regula- 
tions and local by-laws. Safe and hygienic salon 
operation. Salesmanship. Handling routine corre- 
spondence. Financial operations; local scales of 
charges, overheads. Bookkeeping, financial state- 
ments. Purchasing supplies and equipment. 

Public relations. Ethical conduct. Developing per- 
sonality, tolerance, understanding and respect. 
Maintaining salon harmony. Punctuality. 



O. Reg. 250/69, Sched. 2. 



Reg. 36 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



219 



REGULATION 36 



under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 

HAIRDRESSING SCHOOLS 



1. In this Regulation, "hairdressing school" 
means any school, college, business institution or 
establishment that trains or professes to train per- 
sons to qualify for examination for a certificate of 
qualification in the certified trade of hairdresser 
but does not include, 

{a) a hairdressing shop in which appren- 
tices are employed ; or 

(6) a school or college that is under the juris- 
diction of the Department of Education. 
O. Reg. 249/69, s. 1. 

2. No person shall operate a hairdressing school, 

(a) unless he is the holder of a Ucence; and 

(6) unless he operates the school in accord- 
ance with the Act and this Regulation. 
O. Reg. 249/69, s. 2. 

3. — (1) A licence to operate a hairdressing school 
shall be in Form 1 and the fee for the licence or a 
renewal thereof is $50. 



(2) An application for a Hcence to operate a hair- 
dressing school shall be made to the Director in 
Form 2. 



(3) A licence to operate a hairdressing school 
expires with the 31st day of December in the year in 
which it is issued. 



(4) An apphcation for renewal of a licence to 
operate a hairdressing school shall be made to the 
Director not later than the 1st day of December of 
each year. O. Reg. 249/69, s. 3. 

4. — (1) The Director may refuse to issue or renew 
or may revoke a hcence to operate a hairdressing 
school for reasonable cause and shall give notice of 
the decision to the applicant or licensee, as the case 
may be. 

(2) The Director shall not take action under sub- 
section 1 until after conducting a hearing for which 
notice in writing has been sent by registered mail to 
the applicant or hcensee, as the case may be, to his 
last known address containing details of the grounds 
for such proposed refusal or revocation and the date, 
time and place of the hearing. 



(3) Notice of the hearing shall be mailed seven 
clear days before the date thereof and if the apphcant 
or licensee, as the case may be, fails to attend on the 
date and at the time and place appointed, the hearing 
may proceed and the Director may make a decision in 
his absence. 

(4) At the hearing, the applicant or licensee, as 
the case may be, is entitled to be represented by 
counsel or by an agent, and to hear the evidence, to 
cross-examine, to call witnesses and to present argu- 
ment. O. Reg. 249/69, s. 4. 

5. — (1) Where the Director refuses to issue or 
renew or revokes a Ucence to operate a hairdressing 
school, an applicant or hcensee, as the case may be, 
may by notice in writing within thirty days of the 
notice of the decision, appeal the decision of the 
Director to the Minister or such other person as is 
designated in writing by the Minister for the purpose. 

(2) The Minister or such other person designated 
by him shall set the date, time and place for the 
hearing of the appeal, and notice of such hearing shall 
be sent by registered mail to the person appealing. 



(3) If the person appealing fails to attend the 
hearing of the appeal on the date and at the time and 
place appointed, the hearing may proceed and a 
decision may be made in his absence. 

(4) At the hearing of the appeal, the person appeal- 
ing is entitled to be represented by counsel or 
by an agent, and to hear evidence, to cross-examine, 
to call witnesses and to present argument. 

(5) The Minister or such other person designated 
by him shall hear the evidence and submissions and 
shall confirm the decision of the Director or order the 
hcence to be issued, renewed or reinstated. O. Reg. 
249/69, s. 5. 

6. — (1) No holder of a licence to operate a hair- 
dressing school shall enter into a contract to provide 
training and instruction with a candidate for 
enrolment unless the candidate, 

{a) is at least sixteen years of age ; and 

(b) has completed Grade 9 in Ontario or has 
such other academic qualification that, in 
the opinion of the Director, is equivalent 
thereto, 

and unless the licensee has. 



220 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 36 



(c) notified the Director of the proposed enrol- 
ment of the candidate and has received con- 
firmation of the Director's approval of the 
proposed enrolment. 

(2) A copy of the executed contract shall be filed 
by the licensee with the Director and a fee of $5 shall 
be paid by the licensee to the Director for registration 
of the enrolment of the candidate. 

(3) No holder of a licence to operate a hairdressing 
school shall give training or instruction to a student 
unless he complies with subsections 1 and 2. O. Reg. 
249/69. s. 6. 

7. — (1) The period of training and instruction in a 
hairdressing school shall be at least 1,200 hours 
unless otherwise specified in writing by the Director. 

(2) Subsection 1 does not apply to a holder of a 
certificate of qualification in the certified trade of 
hairdresser. 

(3) No student in a hairdressing school shall accept 
any remuneration for work performed in the school. 
O. Reg. 249/69, s. 7. 

8. A holder of a licence to operate a hairdressing 
school shall provide training and instruction in the 
subjects contained in schedules 1 and 2 to Regu- 
lation 35 of Revised Regulations of Ontario, 1970. 
O. Reg. 249/69, s. 8. 

9. A hairdressing school shall employ at least one 
instructor for each ten students enrolled and in 
attendance at the school. O. Reg. 249/69, s. 9. 

10. Every instructor shall, 

{a) be the holder of a certificate of qualification 
in the certified trade of hairdresser for at 
least three years ; and 



(6) be a graduate of a teacher-training course 
that is approved by the Director, 

and no instructor shall perform any hairdressing 
services for a customer of the school except while 
he is actually demonstrating to a student or accept 
any remuneration from a customer for work per- 
formed in the school. O. Reg. 249/69, s. 10. 

11. Where the Director so requires, an instructor 
or student shall furnish, within a reasonable time, a 
certificate of a legally qualified medical practitioner 
that the instructor or student is not suffering from 
any communicable disease. O. Reg. 249/69, s. 11. 

12. No sign, placard or other advertising matter 
shall be used in connection with a hairdressing school 
unless it has been approved by the Director. O. Reg. 
249/69, s. 12. 



13. — (1) The premises of a hairdressing school 
shall be identified by a sign visible from the street and 
where a hairdressing school and a hairdressing shop 
are operated on the same premises, they shall be 
separated by a solid partition reaching from the floor 
to the ceiling and the school shall have a separate 
entrance. 



(2) The holder of a Ucence to operate 
dressing school shall ensure that the school. 



a hair- 



{a) is properly equipped for teaching trade 
theory and practice ; and 

{b) has a total of forty square feet of floor space 
for each student. 

(3) Each chair in a hairdressing school shall be 
placed so that the centre of its base is at least five 
feet distant from the centre of the base of any other 
chair used for the purpose of hairdressing. O. Reg. 
249/69, s. 13. 



14. The premises of a hairdressing school shall be, 

{a) properly painted or papered ; 

(6) properly lighted and ventilated ; 

(c) supplied with an ample supply of hot and 
cold running water ; 

{d) supplied with pure drinking water; and 

{e) kept in a clean and sanitary condition, 

and the licensee shall ensure that, 

{fj any repairs required to keep the premises 
in a safe and habitable condition are made ; 
and 

{g) the cause of any effluvia arising from any 
defective drain or plumbing is removed and 
the defect is corrected. O. Reg. 249/69, 
s. 14. 

15. — (1) The holder of a Hcence to operate a hair- 
dressing school shall ensure that separate wash- 
rooms and toilet rooms for male and female persons 
are provided and the rooms shall, 

(a) be conveniently accessible ; and 

{b) have legible signs indicating for which sex 
the room is provided and be constructed so 
as to prevent a view of their facilities from 
outside the room. 

(2) The holder of a hcence to operate a hair- 
dressing school shall ensure that, 

(fl) a washroom contains one washbasin for 
each fifteen students or fraction thereof ; 



Reg. 36 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



221 



(6) a toilet room provided for male persons 
contains not less than one enclosed flush 
toilet provided with a suitable door and latch 
and one urinal for each twenty-five male 
students or fraction thereof ; and 

(c) a toilet room provided for female persons 
contains not less than one enclosed flush 
toilet provided with a suitable door and 
latch for each fifteen female persons. 
O. Reg. 249/69, s. 15. 

16. Every student in a hairdressing school shall 
be given a minimum of one-half hour for lunch. 
O. Reg. 249/69. s. 16. 

17. Customers of a hairdressing school shall not 
be charged in excess of the amounts shown for the 
following operations : 

i. hair colouring $2.50 

ii. cold wave permanent 7.00 

iii. shampoo and set 1.00 

iv. facial including manipulations 1.00 

V. hair and scalp treatment and condi- 
tioning 1 .00 

vi. manicure 80 

vii. bleaching 3.00 

viii. toner 3.00 

ix. haircut 1.00 

O. Reg. 249/69, s. 17. 

18 — (1) No training or instruction shall be given 
in a hairdressing school, 

(a) on a holiday; and 

{b) before 8.00 a.m. or after 10.00 p.m. on a 
day other than Saturday ; or 

(c) before 8.00 a.m. or after 6.00 p.m. on a 
Saturday. 

(2) No weekly period of training and instruction 
shall exceed a total of forty hours for any student. 
O. Reg. 249/69, s. 18. 

19. Every student and every instructor in a hair- 
dressing school shall wear a clean light-coloured 
coat or smock of washable material. O. Reg. 249/69, 

20. Every student and every instructor shall 
thoroughly clean his hands immediately before 
attending a customer. O. Reg. 249/69, s. 20. 



21. — (1) All combs, clippers, scissors, shaving 
brushes, razors, tweezers, blackhead removers, finger 
bowls, files, pushers, buffers, and all massage and 
scalp applicators and other instruments shall be 
thoroughly cleaned and sterihzed by immersion in 
boiling water or in a suitable antiseptic solution, 
immediately before each use and instruments that 
cannot be so treated shall not be used. 

(2) All hair brushes shall be immersed in a strong 
antiseptic solution, rinsed in clear water and dried 
with a clean towel or by heat, before being used on a 
customer. O. Reg. 249/69, s. 21. 

22. Lather used for shampooing hair shall be made 
only from powdered or liquid soap or other prepara- 
tions contained in non-reusable tubes or pressurized 
containers. O. Reg. 249/69, s. 22. 

23. — (1) A clean towel shall be placed on the 
headrest of every chair used for the purpose of hair- 
dressing and a fresh, clean towel shall be used for 
each customer. 

(2) A fresh, clean neck band or towel shall be 
placed around the neck of each customer immediately 
under the hair cloth. 

(3) Each towel or steamer used shall be fresh and 
clean. 

(4) A fresh, clean insert for each customer shall 
be used with a steamer cap or machine. O. Reg. 
249/69, s. 23. 

24. Hair cloths and all other linen used in a hair- 
dressing school shall be kept clean and freshly laun- 
dered. O. Reg. 249/69, s. 24. 

25. No caustic or styptic pencil shall be used on a 
customer and no alum or other astringent shall be 
applied except in powder or Hquid form. O. Reg. 
249/69, s. 25. 

26. No powder puff or sponge shall be used, but 
fresh, sterilized cotton wadding shall be used in Heu 
thereof for each customer. O. Reg. 249/69, s. 26. 

27. No hairdressing shall be performed on a cus- 
tomer where a rash is present on the surface to be 
treated or the surface is inflamed. O. Reg. 249/69, 

s. 27. 

28. No sink or basin used for domestic purposes 
shall be used in con j unction with a hairdressing school . 
O. Reg. 249/69, s. 28. 

29. A room shall be provided to be used for eating 
purposes and no food shall be consumed in the school 
in a place other than that room. O. Reg. 249/69, 
s. 29. 

30. No hairdressing school shall be used for resi- 
dential purposes. O. Reg. 249/69, s. 30. 



222 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 36 



Form 1 

The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 

LICENCE TO OPERATE A 
HAIRDRESSING SCHOOL 

Under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Quali- 
fication Act and the regulations, and subject to the 
limitations thereof, this licence is issued to 

(name) 



of. 



(address) 
to operate a hairdressing school under the name : 



This licence expires with the .... day of . 
19.... 

Dated at Toronto, this day of 

19.... 



(signature of issuer) 



O.Reg. 249/69, Form 1. 



Form 2 

The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



APPLICATION FOR LICENCE TO 
OPERATE A HAIRDRESSING SCHOOL 



To: 



Director, 

Industrial Training Branch, 
Department of Labour, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



(name) 



(address) 

hereby makes application for a licence to operate 
hairdressing school under the name : 



at, 



(address of school) 
Dated this day of , 19 . 



(signature of appUcant) 
O. Reg. 249/69, Form 2. 



Reg. 37 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



223 



REGULATION 37 



under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



I 



HEAVY DUTY EQUIPMENT MECHANIC 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of heavy 
duty equipment mechanic ; 

(b) "heavy duty equipment" means any mobile 
equipment and attachments thereto used for 
building construction and engineering con- 
struction or for logging, mining and farming 
operations but does not include equipment 
registered for use on a highway under The 
Highway Traffic Act used primarily for the 
transport of persons, equipment or goods; 

(c) "heavy duty equipment mechanic" means a 
person who services, repairs and maintains 
heavy duty equipment. O. Reg. 96/69, s. 1. 

2. The trade of heavy duty equipment mechanic 
is designated as a certified trade for the purposes of 
the Act. O. Reg. 96/69, s. 2. 

3. An apprentice training program for the certified 
trade is established and shall consist of, 

(a) training and instruction at full-time edu- 
cational day classes provided at a College of 
Applied Arts and Technology or in classes 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto ; and 

(b) in practical training and instruction 
provided by an employer of the apprentice, 

in the subjects contained in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 96/69, s. 3. 

4. — (1) Subject to subsections 2, 3 and 4, an 
apprentice shall complete five periods of training and 
instruction of 1800 hours per period. 

(2) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma or has 
Ontario Grade 12 standing in English, Mathematics 
and Science or has such other academic qualification 
that, in the opinion of the Director, is equivalent 
thereto, he shall complete five periods of training and 
instruction of 1600 hours per period. 

(3) Where the apprentice has successfully com- 
pleted Grade 10 in Ontario or has such other academic 
qualification that, in the opinion of the Director, is 
equivalent thereto and in addition has successfully 
completed an approved pre-apprenticeship program, 
he shall complete five periods of training and instruc- 
tion of 1600 hours per period. 



(4) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma or has 
Ontario Grade 12 standing in English, Mathematics 
and Science or has such other academic quaUfication 
that, in the opinion of the Director, is equivalent 
thereto and in addition has successfully completed an 
approved pre-apprenticeship program, he shall com- 
plete five peri\)ds of training and instruction of 1200 
hours per period. O. Reg. 96/69, s. 4. 

5. A person holding a certificate of quaUfication 
in the certified trade of motor vehicle mechanic may 
qualify for examination for a certificate of qualifica- 
tion in the trade of heavy duty equipment mechanic 
by becoming indentured as an apprentice in the trade 
of heavy duty equipment mechanic and completing 
the final two periods of training and instruction of 
1800 hours per period in the subjects contained in 
the Schedule. O. Reg. 96/69, s. 5. 

6. Notwithstanding section 5, a holder of a certi- 
ficate of qualification in the certified trade of motor 
vehicle mechanic may quahfy for examination for a 
certificate of qualification in the trade of heavy duty 
mechanic by submitting written evidence, satis- 
factory to the Director, of having had at least two 
years experience as a j ourney man in the trade of heavy 
duty equipment mechanic. O. Reg. 96/69, s. 6. 

7. Sections 8 and 9 and subsections 2 and 4 of 
section 10 of the Act do not apply to a person who 
works or is employed in the certified trade. O. Reg. 
96/69, s. 7. 

8. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the 
certified trade whether for his regular daily hours or 
for hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall not 
be less than, 

(a) 50 per cent during the first period of training 
and instruction ; 

(b) 60 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; 

(c) 70 per cent during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 

(d) 80 per cent during the fourth period of 
training and instruction ; and 

(e) 90 per cent during the fifth period of training 
and instruction, 

of the average rate of wages for journeymen employed 
by the employer in the trade or, where the employer 
is the only journeyman employed, of the average 
rateof wages for journeymen in the area. O. Reg. 

96/69, s. 8. 



224 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 37 



9. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
are the subjects set out in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 96/69, s. 9. 



10. A certificate of quahfication in the certified 
trade remains in force until cancelled or suspended in 
accordance with the regulations. O. Reg. 96/69, s. 10. 



Schedule 

HEAVY DUTY EQUIPMENT MECHANIC 
Part 1 

In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Mathematics 


Arithmetic 
Geometry 


Addition, subtraction and division of whole numbers 
and fractions, ratio and proportion, areas and 
volumes. 

Lines, planes and angles. 


2 


Science 


Physics 


Basic laws and principles, formulae. (Given as re- 
quired in shop instruction.) 


3 


English 


Basic Usage and 

Business 

Communications 


Trade terminology and usage. Letter and report 
writing. Work and parts orders. Interpretation and 
use of manufacturers' manuals. 


4 


Drafting 


Basic Drafting and 
Interpretation 


Preparation of elementary working drawings and 
dimensioned sketches of heavy duty components. 
Interpretation of exploded drawings, electrical and 
hydraulic circuits and schematics used in manu- 
facturers' manuals. 


5 


General Shop 
Practice 


Safety 

Hand Tools 
Power Tools 


Safety rules and safe operating procedures. First 
aid. Fire prevention. Use and maintenance of fire- 
fighting equipment. 

Handling of gasoline, fuel oils, lubricants and clean- 
ing solvents. Danger of carbon monoxide fumes. 
Correct use of lifting and hoising equipment. Good 
housekeeping. 

Selection and use of hammers, punches, chisels, 
pliers, wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers, hacksaws, 
files, drifts, scrapers, snips, clamps, drill bits, reamers, 
vises, taps and dies. Stud extractbrs. Hones. 

Use and care of portable air and electric drills, 
impact tools, grinders. 



Reg. 37 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



225 



Item 



Column 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Benchwork 



Measuring 
Instruments 



Fastening Devices 



General Shop 
Equipment 



Cutting with hacksaw, filing, scraping, driUing, use 
of drill press. Use of bench grinder; Grinding of drill 
bits, chisels, etc. Fitting bearings, bushings; honing; 
cutting and flaring tubing. Soldering. Gasket making. 
Oxy-acetylene and arc welding and cutting. Brazing 
techniques. Care and maintenance of welding equip- 
ment. 

Use of rules, straight edges and squares. Feeler 

gauges, calipers, verniers, micrometers, telescopic 

gauges, dial indicators, trammel gauges, pressure 
gauges. 

Purpose and types of bolts, nuts, studs, screws and 
tube fittings. Thread identification and classifica- 
tion. Tensile strengths. Installation procedures. 
Tightening torques. Cutting internal and external 
threads. Removing broken studs. "Heli-Coil" inserts. 
Purpose and types of rivets, keys, springs, flat and 
lock washers, snap rings, circlips, cotter pins. Installa- 
tion and removal. Thread lubricants, sealers and 
locking compounds. 

Capacities and correct usage of floor cranes, hoists, 
jacks, stands, blocking, shop and portable hydraulic 
presses and pullers. Power hacksaws. Operation and 
maintenance of degreasing and steamcleaning equip- 
ment and air compressors. Capacities and use of tow 
trucks and related recovery equipment. 



Internal 

Combustion 

Engines 



Principles, Types 
and Definitions 



Engine Components 



Principles of operation ; 2 and 4 stroke cycles. 
Gasoline and Diesel engines. Dual fuel and starting 
engines. Engine types — single and multi-cylinder, 
in-line, slanted, "V" types, flat or pan-cake. Firing 
orders, bore, stroke, combustion, piston displace- 
ment, volumetric efficiency, compression ratios and 
pressures, horsepower, torque. Engine formulae. 
Thermal efficiency. Heat transfer. Combustion 
chamber design. Ignition lag. 

Types and function of components; cylinder blocks, 
wet and dry liners, cylinder heads, pistons, rings and 
pins, connecting rods. Bearings, crankshafts, valves 
and guides, valve trains, camshafts, timing gears or 
chains, gaskets and seals, manifolds, flywheels and 
ring gears. Vibration dampers and balancers. 
Vacuum and compression tests; valve lash. Dis- 
assembling, cleaning, inspecting, testing, repairs, 
reconditioning or replacement. Boring, sleeving, 
honing, grinding, aligning and fitting operations. 
Reassembly sequence for engines and components. 
Fits, clearances and tolerances. Torquing. Valve 
timing; lash adjustment. Engine testing procedures. 
Dynamometer testing. 



226 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 37 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 




Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Types and 


Characteristics of lubricants: Straight mineral and 






Classification of 


additive types. S.A.E. viscosity ratings. A.P.I. 






Lubricants 


classification. Military specifications. Gear lubri- 
cants and greases. Oil contamination and deteriora- 
tion ; effects of fuel-oil sulphur content. Frequency 
of change intervals. Dilution and heating for ex- 
treme cold temperature operation. 






Lubricating Systems 


Types of engine lubricating systems. Pump types 
and function ; pressure, scavenging. Screens full-flow 
and by-pass filters. Pressure regulation and control. 
Crankcase ventilation. Lubricant heaters. System 
servicing and overhaul procedures. 






CoolingSystems 


Air and liquid cooled pressurized systems. Blowers, 
water pumps, fans and drives. Radiators; shrouds 
and shutters. Manifolds. Thermostats. Hoses and 
connections. Temperature indication and control 
methods. Corrosion annd sludge control filters. Oil 
coolers. Immersion heaters. Coolant, additives, 
sealers, and anti-freeze. Cleaning agents. Reverse 
flushing. Radiator fllow testing. System testing, repair 
and overhaul procedures. 






Fuel Systems 


Carburetion principles. Fuel/air ratio. Vaporization 






(Gasoline) 


and atomization. Mixtures. Detonation; octane 
ratings. Preignition. 






(Fuel Supply) 


Mechanical and electric fuel pumps, filters, fuel tanks 
and supply lines. Venting methods. 






(Carburetors) 


Carburetor types and operation: circuits, systems 
and components. Air cleaners. Carburetor and fuel 
system testing, cleaning, repair and overhaul pro- 
cedures. 






Fuel Injection 


Characteristics of diesel fuels; sulphur content, 






Systems 


cetane number. Handling precautions. 






(Combustion 


Combustion principles; compression ignition. Air and 






Principles) 


solid injection, atomization, penetration, turbulence. 
Delay period. Clean air/fuel requirements. 
Combustion systems; open, turbulence and pre- 
combustion chanribers, air cells, energy cells. Dual 
fuel engines. Air induction and scavenging principles ; 
volumetric efficiency, supercharging. 






(Air Induction 


Pipes and manifolds. Gaskets and seals. Air cleaners ; 






Systems) 


oil bath, dry (single and double stage). Dust ejectors. 
Precleaners. Air heaters. Positive displacement 
blowers and turbo-chargers. After-coolers. Manifold 
boost pressures. Inspection, testing, maintenance 
and overhaul procedures. 



Reg. 37 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



227 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be (iiven 






(Fuel Supply) 

(Injection Pumps 
and Injectors) 

(Governors and 
Controls) 

Fuel Systems 
(Liquefied Petroleum 
Gas and Vaporizing 
Oils) 


Types and characteristics of fuel tanks, lines, air 
traps, primary and secondary filters, water traps, 
primary transfer pumps, pressure regulating valves. 
Hand primers. Venting methods. Maintenance, repair 
and overhaul procedures. 

Types, characteristics, and operation; hydraulic, 
distributor, pressure-time. Unit unjection. Constant 
and variable stroke pumps. Automatic injection 
timing controls. Importance of cleanliness. Injector 
types, characteristics, application and operation; 
hydraulic, mechanical, P.T., unit injectors. Nozzle 
types and application. Injection cut-off. Shut-down 
controls. Low and high pressure lines. Bleeding 
systems. Timing pumps to engines. Inspection, adjust- 
ment, overhaul and testing procedures. Use of test 
stands and equipment for timing and calibrating 
pumps and testing injector operation. 

Types, characteristics and operation; mechanical, 
mechanical and hydraulically assisted, hydraulic, 
constant speed, variable or limiting speed. Air/fuel 
ratio controls. Safety shut-off controls and warning 
systems. Speed/load adjustments and overhaul 
procedures. 

Use and operation of L.P.G. systems. Charging 
L.P.G. tanks. Principles of operation using vaporiz- 
ing oils. 


7 


Belt and 
Chain Drives 


Installation and 
Maintenance 


Characteristics of "V" Belts, and chain drives. 
Checking pulley and sprocket condition and align- 
ment. Inspecting, adjusting and replacement pro- 
cedures. 


8 


Exhaust 
Systems 


Mufflers, Pipes and 
Components 


Purpose and features of exhaust systems. Heat 
riser passages. Turbo-chargers. Back pressure checks. 
Inspecting, overhauling and replacing exhaust 
systems and components. Stress relieving systems. 


9 


Electrical 
Systems 


Basic Electricity 


Definition of amperes, voltage, resistance. Ohm's 
Law. Electron flow. Electro-magnetism. Series and 
parallel circuits. Voltage drop. Conductors and 
insulators. Use of voltmeters, ammeters, and ohm- 
meters. 



228 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 37 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Electrical Circuits 



Switches and 
Instruments 



Batteries 



Coil Ignition 
Systems 



Magneto Ignition 



Spark Plugs 



D.C. Charging 

Systems 

(Generators) 



Characteristics of typical heavy duty equipment 
circuits. Voltages and currents. Ground circuits. 
Automotive type wire and cables. Insulation ma- 
terials and conduits. Joining, splicing, soldering and 
insulating wires and cables. Removal and instal- 
lation of terminals, connectors and plugs. Effects of 
temperature, shorts, grounds, poor connections. 
Resistances, fuses and circuit breakers. Identifica- 
tion, tracing and testing of circuits. 

Operation and function of equipment switches, 
relays and gauges. Indicator lights. Hour meters. 
Rheostats, resistors, capacitors and semi-conductors. 
Test, repair and replacement procedures. 

Principles, characteristics and function of lead acid 
batteries. Electro-chemical action. Electrolyte. 
Voltage developed. Ampere hour ratings. Sulfa- 
tion. Inspection, testing and maintenance. Use of 
voltmeters, ammeters, load resistances and hydro- 
meters. Battery charging. Charging and handling 
hazards. Dry-charged batteries; activation pro- 
cedures. Battery heaters. Use of booster batteries. 

Characteristics and function of ignition coils. 
Electro-magnetic induction. Polarity, secondary 
voltage range, internal and external resistors. Coil 
testing equipment; output, insulation and polarity 
tests. Function, mounting and driving of distribu- 
tors. Internal electrical circuits. Cam lobes, single 
and double contact points, dwell angle, condensers. 
Centrifugal and vacuum advance. Secondary volt- 
age distribution. Radio suppression. Ignition timing. 
Inspection, testing and overhaul procedures. 
Synchronizing dual points and distributors. Engine 
speed settings. 

Characteristics, construction and principles of 
operation. Primary and secondary circuits. Breaker 
mechanisms. Impulse couplings. Spark advance 
methods. Timing procedures. Magneto inspection, 
testing, adjusting and overhaul. 

Characteristics and operation. Temperature con- 
trol and heat ranges. Radio suppression. Analyzing 
deposits. Testing, cleaning, gapping and installing. 
Torquing. 

Characteristics. Internally and externally grounded 
fields. Positive and negative grounded systems. 
Generator construction; principles of operation. 
Electro-magnetic induction. Electrical and magnetic 
circuits. Commutation. Polarizing. Regulators and 



Reg. 37 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



229 



Column 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



A.C. Charging 

Systems 

(Alternators) 



Inspection, Testing 
Repair and Overhaul 



Starter Motors 



Special Starting 
Systems 



Lights 



Horns 



Windshield Wipers 



relays; principles of operation and construction 
features. 2 and 3 unit, double contact, heavy duty 
and carbon pile regulators. Voltage and current regula- 
tion ; cut-out relays. Temperature compensation. 

Characteristics. Internally and externally grounded 
fields. Positive and negative ground systems. 
Internally and externally grounded systems. Alter- 
nator construction; principles of operation. Electro- 
magnetic induction. Electrical circuits ("Y" and 
delta). Magnetic circuits. Rectification. Current 
limitation. A.C. regulators and relays; vibrating 
contact, transistorized, transistor types. 
Principles of regulator and relay operation. Voltage 
regulators, field relays. Temperature compensation. 

Inspection and test procedures for generators, alter- 
nators, regulators, relays, wiring and ground cir- 
cuitry. Removing, disassembling, cleaning, over- 
hauling, adjusting, bench-testing and reinstalling 
generators, alternators, regulators, and relays. Re- 
placing wiring. Replacing transistors and diodes. 
Generator and alternator lubrication. 

Characteristics. Construction features. Principles 
of operation. Electro-magnetism. Electric and mag- 
netic circuits. Commutation. Series and compound 
cranking motors. Starter motor drive units. Motor 
solenoids and switches. Solenoid circuits; battery 
disconnect switches. Inspecting and testing starting 
circuits; motors, solenoids, cables and wiring. 
Cleaning, repair and overhaul procedures. 

Series parallel and magnetic switch systems. Diesel 
starting aids; glow plugs, air heaters, flame primers, 
ether capsules. Air and hydraulic starter motors, 
drive units and controls. Testing, repairing or over- 
hauling components. 

Type and characteristics. Bulbs and seal beam 
units. Lenses and holders. Signal lights; flasher 
units, radio interference. Series and parallel cir- 
cuits. Circuit fuses. Ground circuits. Aiming, 
testing, installing and repairing lights. 

Characteristics. Electric and air/vacuum types. 
Horn operation. Electrical circuits and relays. 
Amperage draw. Air/vacuum horn controls. Fuses. 
Inspecting and adjusting horns. 

Characteristics and operation; electric single and 
multi-speed, air/vacuum types. Drives and linkage. 
Arms and blades. Speed control. Fuses. Washer 
operation and cycling. Overhaul and repair pro- 
cedures. 



230 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 37 



Item 



Column 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Heaters and 
Defrosters 



Types, characteristics and operation. Testing, ad- 
justment or replacement of blower motors, actuating 
and control systems and components. 



10 Power Trains 



Clutches (Including 
Cranes and Shovels) 



Manual Shift 
Transmissions 



Power Shift 

Transmissions 

(Hydraulic) 



Drive Shafts 



Types, characteristics and construction features; 
over-center and spring-loaded. Single plate, multi- 
plate. Oil and dry types. Function of controls; 
mechanical, hydraulic, vacuum, air and electrically 
assisted. Adjustments. Disassembly, inspection and 
overhaul of clutches and components. Assembly lubri- 
cants. Clutch reinstallation; aligning procedures; 
control adjustments and clearances. Testing. 

Types, characteristics and construction features. 
Constant mesh and sliding gear transmissions. Over- 
drive units and auxiliary transmissions. Gear ratios, 
speed ranges. Spur gears, helical gears, bevel gears 
and pinions, gear shift inter-locks and sliding jaw 
clutches, internal shift mechanisms. Power flow 
paths. Lubrication; oil sealing and venting, oil 
filters. Direct, remote and assist control mechan- 
isms; servicing and adjustments. Removal and over- 
haul of transmissions, linkages and controls. In- 
spection procedures. Bevel gear and pinion ad- 
justment. Bearing preload. Reinstallation and ad- 
justments. 

Types, characteristics and construction features. 
Principles of operation of planetary gears, clutch 
packs ; friction and reaction plates, servos, bands and 
drums, fluid couplings, torque converters and dividers, 
single and double stage. Hydraulic components and 
circuits. Speed ranges and power flow paths. Trans- 
mission oils; oil coolers and filters; oil sealing and 
venting; draining, refilling and level checking proce- 
dures. Test procedures; tools and testing equipment. 
Performance characteristics ; comparison with specifi- 
cations ; interpretation of results. Stall testing torque 
converters. Testing oil coolers. Removal, overhaul 
and reinstallation procedures for transmissions, fluid 
couplings and torque converters; tools, gauges and 
handling equipment. Cleanliness. Inspection of parts; 
tolerance specifications, fits and clearances. Torquing 
procedures. Control adjustments. 

Characteristics; open drive shafts, center or support 
bearings, universal joints, flexible couphngs, slip 
joints and enclosed drive lines. Disassembly, over- 
haul or relubing; alignment, reassembly and re- 
installation procedures. Torquing. 



Reg. 37 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



231 



Column 1 



Item 



Course 



Column 2 



Subject 



Column 3 



Instruction To Be Gi 



Axles and 
Differentials 



I 



Final Drives 
(Crawler Tractors) 



Characteristics and function. Live axle types. Multi- 
speed, tandem drive, trans-axles, standard and torque 
proportioning differentials, front driving axles, wheel 
planetary drives. Lubrication ; oil sealing and venting. 
Axle and differential control mechanisms ; mechanical, 
electrical, air or vacuum operated : Testing, adjusting, 
and overhaul procedures. Types and characteristics 
of axle bearings. Removing, relubing, replacing, 
adjusting or torquing. Oil seals and deflectors; 
replacement methods. Removing, overhauling and 
reinstalling axles and differentials. Backlash and tooth 
contact adjustments; bearing preload. 

Types and characteristics; single and double reduc- 
tion spur gears and planetary reduction. Bearings. 
Oil seals. Hub, sprocket and shaft removal. In- 
spection, overhaul and adjustment procedures. Use 
of hydraulic pullers. 



11 



Running Gear 



Front End 
Geometry 

Front Suspension 
(Solid Axle) 



Suspension Systems 



Chassis and 
Main Frames 



Track Assemblies 



Purpose and definition of caster, camber, toe-in, and 
kingpin inclination. Correction methods and sequence. 

Construction features. "I" beam and trunnion 
mounted types. "A" frames, radius rods. Servicing 
and straightening procedures. 

Characteristics of leaf springs, helper springs, mount- 
ings and related parts. Coil spring, torsion bar and 
air/hydraulic, nitrogen/hydraulic suspension systems. 
Shock absorbers, stabilizers, hangers and suspension 
control rods. Inspecting, overhauling suspensions and 
related components. Torquing. Lubrication. 

Types and construction features; wheeled equip- 
ment. Crawler-base equipment; "A" frames, base, 
arch and deck frames. Equalizer bars. Pivot shafts. 
Draw-bars. Outriggers (truck mounted cranes). 
Inspection, repair and aligning procedures. Heat 
straightening. Rivetted, welded and bolted frame 
repairs. 

Types and construction features; track frames, front 
idlers, track rollers, carrier rollers, bearings, seals, 
recoil cylinders and springs. Tracks; shoes, links, 
bushings, pins, drive sprockets. Track tensioning 
systems. Track system wear points and measure- 
ment. Pivot shaft and equalizer bar mountings. 
Inspection, repair and overhaul procedures. Track 
frame alignment and straightening. Correct lifting 
and supporting methods. Hydraulic track pin re- 
moval equipment. 



232 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 37 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Steering Systems 

(Wheeled 

Equipment) 

(Crawler Tractors) 

Wheels and Rims 
Tires and Tubes 


Types and characteristics; cam and lever, worm and 
roller, worm and sector, recirculating ball. Steering 
linkage, bushings and joints. Pumps, control valves 
and steering cylinders. Feed-back methods. Lean- 
ing wheel mechanisms. Multi-wheel steering. Oil 
seals. Level checking. Bleeding systems. Inspec- 
tion, adjustment and overhaul procedures. 

Types, construction features and operation ; multi- 
disc steering clutches and brakes; oil cooled and dry 
types. Differential and planetary geared systems. 
Controls and boosters. Lubrication. Steering clutch 
and brake linkage adjustments. Inspection and over- 
haul procedures. 

Types, sizes and characteristics. Wheel to hub 
fastenings and locating devices. Removing and re- 
installing wheels and rims. Correct jacking points. 
Inspecting, repairing and servicing. Permissible 
run-out. 

Types, sizes, characteristics and construction. In- 
spection and identification of tire wear and irregular- 
ities. Demounting and mounting methods; equipment 
and lubricants. Tire, tube and valve repair. Inflation 
precautions. Retreaded tires. Tire weighting to im- 
prove traction ; dry and liquid methods. 


12 


Brake Systems 


Service Brakes 

Parking and 
Emergency Brakes 


Types, function and principles of brake actuating 
devices and brake operating systems; hydraulic, air, 
air-hydraulic, electric. Operation of system com- 
ponents; air compressors, unloader valves, governors, 
reservoirs; emergency relay valves, treadle controls, 
quick release valves, protection valves, low pressure 
indicators, flexible hoses and fittings. Operation of 
brake chambers, slack adjusters, brake shoes and 
linings, anchor pins, camshafts and rollers. Master 
cylinders and wheel cylinders. Hydraulic and exhaust 
type hill-retarder systems. Inspection, overhaul, 
reassembly, adjustment and testing of brake assem- 
blies and systems. Servicing intervals. Reassembly 
lubrication. Road testing. 

Characteristics and construction features; disc and 
drum types. Maxi-brakes. Inspection, adjusting and 
overhaul procedures. 


13 


Hydraulics 


Basic Principles 


Hydraulic principles; Pascal's Law. Basic hydraulic 
systems and schematics. Applications. Safe work 
practices. 



Reg. 37 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



233 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Cours 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Pump Units 



Hydraulic Cylinders 



Hydraulic Valves 
and Lines 



Reservoirs and 
Accumulators 



Hydrostatic Drives 



Characteristics; vane, gear and piston pumps. Posi- 
tive displacement, fixed and variable delivery. 
G.P.M. flow. Aeration. Cavitation. Hydraulic fluid 
types and characteristics. Inspection, testing and 
overhaul procedures. 

Types and characteristics; single and double acting, 
single and double end. Cushion rings and plungers. 
Seals and packings. Inspection, servicing and over- 
haul procedures. 

Valve types and characteristics; flow types; check, 
flow-control, divider. Pressure types; relief (simple 
compound), differential, modulating, safety. Con- 
trol types; spool, 2-way, 4-way. Inspection, testing, 
servicing and overhaul procedures. 
Hydraulic lines and fittings; selection of pipes, tubing 
and flexible hoses; working pressures, temperature 
requirements. Installation and maintenance pro- 
cedures. 

Reservoir characteristics and construction features; 
capacity, location, clean-outs, filters, strainers, baffles, 
breathers. Heat dissipation. Fluid coolers. Condensa- 
tion. Heaters for extreme low temperature operation. 
Accumulator characteristics and function ; Spring 
loaded and gas charged (nitrogen) types. Surge and 
shock damping action. Servicing and overhaul pro- 
cedures. 

Types of drives; prime movers, pumps, motors, valve 
controls. Torque ranges. Output characteristics; 
constant torque/variable horsepower, constant horse- 
power/variable torque, variable horsepower/variable 
torque. Servicing and overhaul procedures. 



14 



Attachments and 

Ancillary 

Equipment 



Power Winches 



Accessories and 
Equipment 



Front and rear mounted types. Single drum, double 
drum. Clutch types; cone, multi-disc. Gear drives. 
Controls. Inspection, adjustment and overhaul pro- 
cedures. 

Types and characteristics ; bulldozer blades, push 
arms and "C" frames. Loader frames, lift and tilt 
arms, buckets, loading forks. Scraper bowls, aprons, 
ejectors. Crane booms, shovel fronts, pull-shovels, 
drag and clam buckets. Grader scarifiers, rippers, 
blades, snow plows and wings. Gradall buckets, 
blades, stumping hooks. Paving equipment ; augers 
and screeds. Crusher rolls and pitman jaws. Plant 
pugmills and driers. Inspection, repair and over- 
haul procedures. Repair or replacement of cutting 
edges and wear points. Adjustment and overhaul of 
controls. 



234 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 37 



Part 2 
Work Instruction Training 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Work Instruction and Experience 



General Shop 
Practice 



General 



Safety rules and removal of all safety hazards. First 
aid. Fire prevention. Use of hand and power tools, 
measuring instruments, fastening devices and general 
shop equipment. 
Benchwork operations. 
(As detailed in Part 1.) 



Internal 

Combustion 

Engines 



Operation, Testing 
and Adjustment 
(Gasoline and Diesel) 



Engine 
Reconditioning 



Lubricants 



Lubricating 
Systems 



Cooling Systems 



Fuel Systems 
(Gasoline) 



Familiarization with engine types, components and 
correct operation. Recognition of abnormal engine 
noises and exhaust. Vacuum and compression testing. 
Identification of effects of cylinder and bearing wear, 
defective valves, gaskets, seals, incorrect valve 
timing, lubricant and coolant temperatures on engine 
performance. Torquing heads and manifolds. Adjust- 
ing valve lash. 

Engine and component disassembly; cleaning, in- 
spection, repair, reconditioning or replacement. 
Boring, sleeving, honing, grinding, alignment and 
fitting operations. Reassembly of engines and com- 
ponents. Fits, clearances and tolerances. Valve timing. 
Torquing. Engine testing. 

Familiarization with lubricant characteristics, classi- 
fications and ratings; contamination and deteriora- 
tion, frequency of change intervals. 

Familiarization with types, operation and require- 
ments. Servicing, overhaul or replacement of pumps, 
screens, oil lines and filters. Testing, servicing and 
adjustment of pressure regulators, controls and 
crankcase ventilation systems. 

Air and liquid cooled pressurized systems. Inspec- 
tion, testing, overhaul or replacement of blowers, 
fans, water pumps, drives, radiators, shrouds and 
shutters, manifolds, thermostats, hoses and con- 
nections, temperature indicators, immersion heaters, 
transmission oil coolers, filter units. Radiator reverse 
flushing and flow-testing; use of cleaning agents, 
coolant additives, sealers. Testing anti-freeze solu- 
tions. 

Mechanical fuel/vacuum and electric pumps. Test- 
ing, repair, overhaul or replacement of pumps, tanks 
and supply lines. Carburetors; types, operation, cir- 
cuits and systems. Air cleaners. Testing, adjusting, 
cleaning, overhaul and tune-up operations. 



Reg. 37 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



235 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 




• 


Fuel Injection 
Systems 

Fuel Systems 
(Liquefied Petroleum 
Gas and Vaporizing 
Oils) 


Precombustion chambers, air cells, energy cells. 
Dual fuel engines. Manifolds. Air cleaners. Air 
heaters. Blowers and turbo-chargers. Aftercoolers. 
Fuel tanks, lines, air traps, filters, water traps, pri- 
mary transfer pumps, pressure regulating valves. 
Hydraulic, distributor, pressure-time injection 
pumps. Hydraulic, mechanical, P.T., unit injectors. 
Fuel injection and air induction system inspection, 
adjustment, overhaul and testing operations. Timing 
and calibrating pumps and testing injector operation. 
Bleeding systems. Timing pumps to engines. 
Governors and controls. Speed/load adjustments 
and overhaul operations. Shutting-down over- 
speeding engines. 

Use and operation of L.P.G. systems. Charging 
L.P.G. tanks. Principles of operation using vaporiz- 
ing oils. 


3 


Belt and 
Chain Drives 


Installation and 
Maintenance 


Inspecting, installing, aligning and adjusting; "V" 
belts, pulleys, chains and sprockets. 


4 


Exhaust 
Systems 


Mufflers, Pipes, 
Components 


Back pressure checks. Replacing exhaust systems. 
Overhauling components. 


5 


Electrical 
Systems 


Electrical Circuits 

Switches and 
Instruments 

Batteries 

Coil Ignition 
Systems 

Magnetos, Impulse 
Couplings 

Spark Plugs 


Identification, tracing and testing of circuits. Use of 
voltmeters, ammeters and ohmmeters. Joining, 
splicing, soldering and insulating wires and cables. 
Removal and installation of terminals, connectors, 
plugs, resistances, fuses, circuit breakers, conduit. 

Switches, relays and gauges, meters, indicator lights, 
rheostats, resistors, capacitors and semi-conductors. 
Testing, repair and replacement. 

Inspection, testing and maintenance. Use of volt- 
meters, ammeters, load resistances and hydrometers. 
Battery charging. Activation of dry-charged bat- 
teries. Battery heaters. 

Ignition coil inspection, testing and replacement. 
Testing primary and secondary circuits. Replace- 
ment of primary and high tension wiring, primary 
circuit switches and resistors. Distributor tests. 
Inspection and overhaul procedures. Lubrication. 
Installation and timing. Synchronizing dual points 
and distributors. Engine speed adjustments. 

Inspection, testing, adjusting, overhaul and timing. 

Analyzing deposits. Testing, cleaning, gapping and 
instalHng. 



236 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 37 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






ChargingSystems 
D.C. (Generators) 
A. C. (Alternators) 

Starter Motors 

Special Starting 
Systems 

Lights 

Heaters and 
Defrosters 

Horns 

Windshield Wipers 
and Washers 


Inspection and testing of generators, alternators, 
regulators, relays, wiring and ground circuitry. 
Removing, overhauling or replacing and reinstalling. 
Polarizing generators. Lubrication. Replacing 
transistors and diodes. Bench testing and adjust- 
ment of regulators and relays. 

Inspecting and testing starting circuits, motors, 
drive units, switches, solenoids, cables and wiring. 
Removing, overhauling, testing and reinstalling. 
Lubrication. 

Series parallel and magnetic switch systems. Diesel 
staring aids: glow plugs, air heaters, fiame primers, 
ether capsules. Air and hydraulic starter motor 
systems. Testing, repairing or replacing compo- 
nents. 

Circuits. Bulbs and seal beam units. Lenses and 
holders. Signal lights; flasher units. Aiming, testing, 
installing and repairing lights and wiring. 

Testing, adjustment or replacement of blower motors, 
actuating or control systems. 

Electric and air/vacuum types. Electrical circuits 
and relays. Air/vacuum horn controls. Testing, 
adjusting, or replacement. 

Electric single and multi-speed, air/vacuum types. 
Speed controls and washers. Overhaul, repair or 
replacement. 


6 


Power Trains 


Clutches (Including 
Cranes and Shovels) 

Manual Shift 
Transmissions 

Power Shift 

Transmissions 

(Hydraulic) 


Single and multi-plate; mechanical, hydrauHc, 
vacuum, air and electrically operated controls; ser- 
vicing and adjustment. Inspection, overhauling and 
reinstallation. Control adjustments and clearances. 
Testing. 

Standard transmissions; constant mesh and sliding 
gear. Direct and remote controls, power assist 
mechanisms, over drives, auxiliary drives. Servicing 
and adjustment. Removal, inspection, overhaul 
and reinstallation. Control adjustments. Lubrica- 
tion. Testing. 

Shop testing; Familiarization with performance 
characteristics and specifications. Pressure testing 
transmission oil circuits; interpretation of results. 
Testing oil coolers. Stall testing torque converters. 
Removal, inspection, overhaul and reinstallation 
procedures for transmissions, fluid couplings, torque 
converters and hydraulic components. Torquing. 
Level checking. Control adjustments. 



Reg. 37 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



237 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Work Instruction and Experience 



Drive Shafts 



Axles and 
Differentials 



Final Drives 
(Crawler Tractors) 



Open drive shafts, center or support bearings, uni- 
versal joints, flexible couplings, slip joints and en- 
closed drive lines. Disassembly, overhaul or re- 
lubing; reassembly and reinstallation. 

Live axles. Multi-speed, tandem drive, trans-axles, 
standard and torque proportioning differentials, front 
driving axles, wheel planetary drives. Axle and 
differential control mechanisms; mechanical, elec- 
trical, air or vacuum operated: Testing, adjusting 
and overhaul procedures. Axle bearings. Removing 
relubing, replacing, adjusting or torquing. Oil seal 
replacement. Removing, overhauling and reinstal- 
ling axles and differentials. Lubrication. 



Single and double reduction spur gears and planetary 
reduction. Bearings. Oil seals. Hub, sprocket and 
shaft removal. Inspection, overhaul and adjust- 
ment operations. Use of hydraulic pullers. 



Running Gear 



Front Suspension 
(Solid Axle) 



Suspension Systems 



Chassis and 
Main Frames 



Track Assemblies 



Steering Systems 
(Wheeled Equipment) 



"I" beam and trunnion mounted types. "A" frames, 
radius rods. Servicing and straightening procedures. 
Correction of caster, camber, toe-in, and kingpin 
inclination. 

Leaf springs, helper springs, mountings and related 
parts. Coil spring, torsion bar and air/hydraulic, 
nitrogen/hydraulic suspension systems. Shock ab- 
sorbers, stabilizers, hangers and suspension control 
rods. Inspecting, overhauling suspensions and 
related components. Torquing. Lubrication. 

Wheeled equipment. Crawler-base equipment; 
"A" frames, base arch and deck frames. Equalizer 
bars. Pivot shafts. Draw-bars. Articulated frames. 
Outriggers (truck mounted cranes). Inspection, 
repair and aligning. Heat straightening. Rivetted, 
welded and bolted frame repairs. 

Track frames, front idlers, track rollers, carrier 
rollers, bearings, seals, recoil cylinders and springs. 
Tracks; shoes, links, bushings, pins, drive sprockets. 
Track tensioning systems. Track system wear measure- 
ment. Pivot shaft and equalizer bar mountings. 
Inspection, adjustment, repair and overhaul. Track 
frame alignment and straightening. Use of hydraulic 
track pin removal equipment. 

Cam and lever, worm and roller, worm and sector, 
recirculating ball types. Steering linkage, bushings 
and joints. Pumps, control valves and steering 
cylinders. Leaning wheel mechanisms. Multi-wheel 
steering. Inspection, adjustment and overhaul 
operations. 



238 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 37 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






(Crawler Tractors) 

Wheels and Rims 
Tires and Tubes 


Multi-disc steering clutches and brakes; oil cooled 
and dry types. Differential and planetary geared 
systems. Controls and boosters. Steering clutch 
and brake linkage adjustments. Inspection and 
overhaul operations. Lubrication. 

Removing and reinstalling wheels and rims. In- 
specting, repairing and servicing. Checking run-out. 

Inspection and identification of tire wear and faults. 
Demounting and mounting tires. Tire, tube and 
valve repair. Inflation precautions. Tire weighting 
to improve traction. 


8 


Brake Systems 


Service Brakes 

Parking and 
Emergency Brakes 


Hydraulic, air, air-hydraulic, electric operated sys- 
tems. Air compressors, unloader valves, governors, 
reservoirs; emergency relay valves, treadle controls, 
quick release valves, protection valves, low pressure 
indicators, flexible hoses and fittings. Brake cham- 
bers, slack adjusters, brake shoes and linings, anchor 
pins, camshafts, brake drums. Master cylinders and 
wheel cylinders. Hydraulic and exhaust type hill- 
retarder systems. Inspection, overhaul, recondition- 
ing, reassembly, adjustment and testing of brake 
assemblies and systems. 

Disc and drum types. Maxi-brakes. Inspection, 
adjusting and overhaul. 


9 


Hydraulics 


Basic Principles 

Pump Units 

Hydraulic Cylinders 

Hydraulic Valves 
and Lines. 

Reservoirs and 
Accumulators 


Hydraulic principles; Pascal's Law. Basic hydraulic 
systems and schematics. Applications. Safe work- 
ing pratices. 

Vane, gear and piston pumps. Positive displace- 
ment, fixed and variable delivery. Inspection, test- 
ing and overhaul. 

Single and double acting, single and double end. 
Cushion rings and plungers. Seals and packings. 
Inspection, servicing and overhaul. 

Flow; check, flow-control, divider, types. Pressure; 
relief (simple and compound), differential, modulat- 
ing, safety, types. Control; spool, 2-way, 4-way, 
types. Inspection, testing, servicing and overhaul 
procedures. Hydraulic lines, hoses and fittings. 
Installation and maintenance operations. 

Reservoir clean-outs, filters, strainers, baffles, 
breathers. Fluid coolers. Heaters. 
Spring loaded and gas charged (nitrogen) accumu- 
lators. Servicing and overhaul operations. 



Reg. 37 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



239 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Hydrostatic Drives 


Prime movers, pumps, motors, valve controls. Con- 
stant torque/variable horsepower, constant horse- 
power/variable torque, variable horsepower/variable 
torque types. Servicing and overhaul operations. 


10 


Attachments and 

Ancillary 

Equipment 


Power Winches 

Accessories and 
Equipment 


Front and rear mounted types. Single drum, double 
drum. Cone, multi-disc clutches, Gear drives. Con- 
trols. Inspection, adjustment and overhaul opera- 
tions. 

Bulldozer blades, push arms and "C" frames. Loader 
frames, lift and tilt arms, buckets, loading forks. 
Scraper bowls, aprons, ejectors. Crane booms, shovel 
fronts, pull-shovels, drag and clam buckets. Grader 
scarifiers, rippers, blades, snow plows and wings. 
Gradall buckets, blades, stumping hooks. 
Paving equipment ; augers and screeds. Crusher 
rolls and pitman jaws. Plant pugmills and driers. 
Inspection, repair and overhaul operations. Repair 
or replacement of cutting edges and wear points. 
Adjustment and overhaul of controls. Blocking and 
loading operations. 



O. Reg. 96/69, Sched. 



I 



240 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 38 



REGULATION 38 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



IRONWORKERS 
1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "ironworker" means a person who, 

(i) in the field, fabricates, assembles, 
installs, hoists, erects, dismantles, 
reconditions, adjusts, alters, repairs 
or services all structural ironwork, 
precast and prestressed concrete, 
concrete reinforcing materials, fer- 
rous and non-ferrous materials in 
curtain wall, ornamental and mis- 
cellaneous metal work and all other 
materials used in lieu thereof and 
appUes sealants where appUcable 
thereto, and moves and places ma- 
chinery and heavy equipment, and 

(ii) reads and understands all shop and 
field drawings, including those taken 
from original architectural and en- 
gineering drawings, that are related 
to the work operations contained in 
subclause i ; 

(b) "trade" means the trade of an ironworker, 
but does not include a person employed as 
a shop-man on the fabrication and assembly 
of materials in an industrial manufactur- 
ing plant. O. Reg. 122/67, s. 1. 

2. — (1) An apprentice training program is estab- 
lished for the trade and shall consist of three periods 
of training and instruction of 2000 hours each, 

(a) at full-time educational day classes pro- 
vided at a College of Apphed Arts and 
Technology in the subjects contained in 
Schedule 1 ; and 

{b) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by the employer of the apprentice 
in the occupational skills contained in 
Schedule 2. 

(2) The total hours of related training and work 
experience shall be assigned as shown in schedules 1 
and 2. O. Reg. 122/67, s. 2. 

3. Every apprentice in the trade shall be at least 
seventeen years of age. O. Reg. 122/67, s. 3. 



4. Every apprentice in the trade shall be in good 
physical condition and shall provide medical proof 
thereof. O. Reg. 122/67, s. 4. 



5. No apprentice shall be permitted to engage in 
the trade unless he is capable of climing to and 
manoeuvring at heights commonly experienced in 
the trade. O. Reg. 122/67, s. 5. 



6. — (1) Notwithstanding subsection 2 of section 8 
of Regulation 33 of Revised Regulations of Ontario, 
1970, every hour worked by an apprentice in excess 
of his regular daily hours of practical training and 
instruction shall be included in computing the hours 
spent in training and instruction. 

(2) A progress record book shall be issued by the 
Department of Labour to each registered apprentice 
for the purpose of recording work experience and 
related training time and the apprentice shall be 
responsible for the safekeeping of this progress record 
book. O. Reg. 122/67, s. 6. 



7. The basic rate of wages for an apprentice in 
the trade whether for his regular daily hours or 
hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall be not 
less than, 

(a) 60 per cent during the first 1000 hours of 
training and instruction ; 

(b) 70 per cent during the second 1000 hours 
of training and instruction ; 

(c) 75 per cent during th6 third 1000 hours 
of training and instruction ; 

{d) 80 per cent during the fourth 1000 hours 
of training and instruction ; 

(e) 85 per cent during the fifth 1000 hours 
of training and instruction ; and 

(/) 90 per cent during the sixth 1000 hours 
of training and instruction, 

of the basic rate of wages or its equivalent for a 
journeyman employed by the same employer in the 
trade and with whom the apprentice is working, j 
O. Reg. 122/67, s. 7. 



8. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the trade shall not exceed, 

{a) one apprentice for the first journeyman 
employed by the employer plus one addi- 
tional apprentice for each additional seven 
journeymen employed by the employer in 
the trade ; and 



Reg. 38 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



241 



{b) one apprentice for the first journeyman 
employed by the employer plus one addi- 
tional apprentice for each additional five 
journeymen employed by the employer in 
the trade where the employer is engaged 
solely in paragraph 3 (Curtain Wall) or 
paragraph 4 (Ornamental and Miscel- 
laneous Ironwork) as contained ih Schedule 
2. O. Reg. 122/67. s. 8. 



9. A contract of apprenticeship shall be entered 
into by every apprentice with the local apprentice- 
ship committee for the trade established under the 



Act in the area in which his apprenticeship originates, 
and the apprentice shall be responsible for preparing 
the reports of his work experience and instruction as 
prescribed in his progress report book for submission 
to such local apprenticeship committee. O. Reg. 
122/67,s.9. 

10. The local apprenticeship committee shall be 
responsible for periodic review of the progress of 
each apprentice and for ensuring that the ap- 
prentice obtains the prescribed range of work 
experience and related training as prescribed in the 
appendix of the progress record book. O. Reg. 
122/67, s. 10. 



242 



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Reg. 38 



Schedule 1 
IRON WORKERS 

In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instructions to be given 


1 


Applied Mathematics 


Total Hours 636 

Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole 
numbers, fractions, mixed numbers, decimal fractions. Con- 
version of common fractions to decimals. Averages and percent- 
ages, linear measurement, simple equations. Ratio and pro- 
portion. Angle measurement. Areas of squares, rectangles, 
parallelograms, trapezoids, triangles. Volumes of cubes and 
cylindrical objects. Measurement of regular and irregular 
shaped forms. 


2 


Blueprint Reading 
Architectural 
Structural 
Shop Drawings 


Types, methods of making, care and handling of prints. Lines 
and sections. Material symbols. Construction drawing elements, 
principles, symbols and dimensions. Auxiliary views. Notes 
and specifications. Steel frame construction members, framing 
for ore bridges, power houses, highway bridges, factory and 
office buildings and conveyors. Design and detail drawings. 
Column, purlin, strut, brace, and beam symbols. Concrete 
reinforcing drawings for reinforcing bars and concrete reinforced 
steel accessories. Engineering and placing drawings. Wire 
mesh drawings. Reinforced concrete design drawings. Welding 
drawings and symbols, curtain wall, sash and other non-ferrous 
building trim drawings. Precast concrete drawings. Ornamental 
drawings for doors, frames, stairs, gratings and grills. 


3 


Structural Ironwork 
Layout and Fabrication 

Erection and Assembly of 
Structural Steel Shapes 

Connecting 

Hoisting and Installing 

Care and use of Tools 


Methods and procedures for drilhng, reaming, burning, cutting, 
assembling and marking steel members. 

Methods and procedures for performing the functions of hooking- 
on, tagging, signalling, connecting, fitting, bolting, rivetting, 
guying, plumbing, aligning and shimming. 

Knowledge of bolting, rivetting, pinning, and welding techniques. 

Knowledge of the care and use of mobile land rigs, cranes, guy 
derricks, stiff-leg derricks, gin poles, high lines and tuggers. Erect- 
ing falsework and scaffolding and a knowledge of the breaking 
strains and working strengths of cables. 

Knowledge of chokers, spreaders, chain blocks, rope falls, shackles, 
riveting guns, bolting machines, air compressors, burning equip- 
ment, welding equipment and jacks. Power activated tools and 
insert setting tools. 



Reg. 38 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



243 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instructions to be given 




Precast Concrete and 
Laminated Timbers 

Safety Regulations 


Methods of handling precast and prestressed members. Hoisting 
and placing precast columns, beams, roof and floor slabs, architec- 
tural precast units, fascia panels and wall panels. 

Safety regulations and procedures for the performance of struc- 
tural ironwork. 


4 


Rigging 

Care and use of Tools 

Tieing Knots and 
making Hitches 

Splicing 

Handling Ropes 

Care and use of Slings 

Care and use of Hoisting 
Equipment 

Care and use of Scaffolding 

Safety 


Splicing tools. 

Tieing knots and making bowline hitches, clovehitch, timber 
hitch, scaffold hitch, barrel hitch, becket hitch, half hitch and 
roUing hitch. 

SpHcing fibre and wire rope by short splicing, long splicing, 
crown and back spHcing methods. 

Handling fibre and wire rope, including coihng and uncoiHng, 
cutting, fitting clips and clamps, reeving drums and sheaves. 

Proper use and positioning of chokers, spreaders, hooks, guy 
lines and anchorage. Knowledge of the breaking strains and 
working strengths of hoisting cables. 

Knowledge of hoisting equipment, including block and tackle, 
reeving or lacing equipment, chain blocks and come-alongs, 
skids, rollers, jacks, blocking equipment, cribbing gin poles, 
stiff-leg derricks, mobile cranes, bull-mooses, and tower cranes. 

Knowledge of scaffolding and tower hoists equipment, including 
planking, swinging scaffolds, suspended scaffolds, needle beams, 
boatswain chairs and safeway scaffolding. 

Safety requirements and procedures for the performance of 
rigging operations. 


5 


Reinforcing Ironwork 
Knowledge of Materials 

Placing Steel 

Tieing 

Cutting and Bending 

Tools and Associate 
Equipment 


Knowledge of the specifications for bar size designations and 
size marks, bar tags and colours, wire mesh, stirrups, slab spacers, 
slab and beam bolsters, chairs and lapping. 

Knowledge of the methods of placing steel in floor slabs, beams, 
columns, walls, piers, footings and stairways. 

Knowledge of the method of making snap ties, wrap and snap 
ties, column ties, wrap and figure eight ties and nail head ties. 

Knowledge of the method of cutting, bending, and fabricating 
steel bars for columns, beams, floor slabs, and stirrups and a 
detailed knowledge of bend allowances. 

Knowledge of the care and use of pliers, safety belts and reels, 
twisters, hickey bars, bolt cutters, bending tables and jigs, 
power shears and burning equipment. 



244 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 3S 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instructions to be given 




Laying of Pans 

Post Tensioning of Concrete 

Layout Procedures 

Welding 

Safety Requirements 


Methods of installation. 

Methods of post tensioning. 

Knowledge of blueprint reading and bar lists for placing of bars. 

Knowledge of welding techniques. 

Knowledge of the safety regulations and procedures for the 
performance of reinforcing operations. 


6 


Ornamental Ironwork and 
Curtain Wall Installa- 
tions 
Layout 

Erecting and Fitting 

Curtain Wall, Window Wall 
and Sash 

Installation of Metal 
Products 

Care and use of Tools 
Sealing 

Safety Procedures 


Knowledge of the layout methods for doors, frames, gratings 
and grills, hand rails, stairways, platforms, raihngs and miscella- 
neous ironwork. 

Knowledge of welding, driUing, burning, bending, fabricating, 
plumbing and alignment. 

Knowledge of the care and handling and fabrication of aluminum, 
brass, bronze, stainless steel and other ferrous and non-ferrous 
building trim. Methods for the installation of automatic door 
mechanisms. 

Knowledge of the methods for installing extruded aluminum 
frames, side jambs, head jambs, sash, division and corner bars. 
Familiarization with plans and specifications establishing lines 
and levels, setting anchors, assembhng and instalhng curtain 
wall components, levelling, ahgning, securing, and installing 
adapters, flashing and sealants. 

Knowledge of ordinary hand tools. 

Knowledge of the care and use of resin base, silicon base, polysul- 
phide base, mastic base and polybutane base sealants. 

Knowledge of the safety regulations and procedures for the 
performance of ornamental iron and curtain wall work. 


7 


Welding and Burning 
Equipment 
Electric Arc Welding 

Cutting or Burning or 
Cutting and Burning 


Knowledge in the care and use of electrodes, AC and DC welding 
machines, cables and allied equipment. Fundamentals of manual 
welding of carbon and alloy steels, including proper fit-up, distor- 
tion control and cause and control of weld defects. Purpose 
and techniques for preheating, post heating and stress relieving. 

Knowledge and use of oxy-acetylene equipment both hand and 
machine for flame cutting steel, and piercing. Knowledge and 
use of carbon-arc equipment for removing steel, making weld 
grooves and cutting steel. 



Reg. 38 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



245 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instructions to be giveiv 




Safety 


Knowledge of first aid treatment for arc burns to eyes and body, 
and electric shock. Importance of protective equipment and 
clothing. Hazards of working on or in vessels or tanks or con- 
fined areas. 



O.Reg. 122/67, Sched.l, 



Schedule 2 

IRONWORKERS 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Occupational Skills 


Instruction to be Given 


1 


Structur.\l Ironwork and 


Total Hours 2652 




Rigging 






Layout and Lines 


Transferring lines and grades to structure. 
Laying out structural steel. 




Selection and use of hand tools 






— Non-cutting tools 


Wrenches, hammers, pins, clamps, leverage tools, air hose 
clamps, punches. 




— Cutting tools 


Cold chisels, handsaws, files, snips, axes, adze, wood boring, 
wood chisels, flame cutting, carbon arc cutting. 




— Portable air tools 


Impact wrenches, drills and reamers, hammers, grinders and 
brushes, timber saws, rivet passers. 




— Portable electric tools 


Drills, grinders, impact wrenches, ventilating equipment, lumber 
saws. 




— Miscellaneous 


High mechanical advantage machines, forges, heating torches. 




Rope and tackle 


Selecting rope, installing rope, selecting sheave blocks, installing 
sheave blocks, installing high hne. 




Scaffolds and Falsework 


Selecting a hanging scaffold. 

Hanging a scaffold. Maintaining hanging scaffolds. Selecting 
a rigid scaffold or walkway, installing and maintaining rigid 
scaffold or walkway. 




Ladders and Stairways 


Selection, erecting, maintaining. 




Barricades and Security 


The Construction Safety Act 

Maintaining security. Personal safety equipment. 




False work 


Erection. Releasing. 




Timberwork 


Slinging and handling timber structures. 



246 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 38 





Column 1 


Column 2 


ITEM 


Occupational Skills 


Instruction to be Given 




Erection Equipment 
Cranes 


Types of and usage. Loading, moving and receiving. Setting 
up. Lifting with cranes. Maintenance. 




Derricks 


Types of and usage. Loading. Erecting. Lifting and mainten- 
ance. 




Hoists and winches 


Types and usage. Installation. Operation. 




Jacks 


Types and usage. Setting up. Operating. Maintenance. 




Heavy moving equipment 


Types, characteristics and purpose. Using. 




Other erection equipment 


Types and usage. 




Erection techniques 
Evaluating structures 


Types and characteristics. 




Shipping and handhng 


Loading and unloading structural steel and plate, and precast 
concrete. 




Slinging and hooking on 


Methods and procedures. 




Connecting 


Methods and procedures. 




Field fabrication 


Methods and procedures. 




Plumbing and alignment 


Methods and procedures for columns, spandrels, girts and 
elevator shafts. 




Fastening techniques 
Welding 


Types of electrodes. Equipment. Methods and procedures. 




Bolting 


Types of bolts. Usage of bolting equipment. Methods and 
procedures. 




Rivetting 


Types of rivets. Usage of rivetting equipment. Methods and 
procedures. 




Heavy Structural Pins 


Installation. 




Inspection and Testing 
Weldments 


Inspection methods and procedures. 




Bolts 


Methods and procedures. 




Rivets 


Methods and procedures. 




Safety procedures 


Knowledge of The Construction Safety Act and all safe practices of 
the trade. 


2 


Concrete Reinforcing 


Total Hours 872 




Drawings and codes 


Types of plans, placing plans, sections,, schedules, Concrete 
Reinforcing Steel Institute recommended practice and Canadian 
Standards Association — A23— 1960 standards, trade terminol- 
ogy, applicable reference tables and coding. 



Reg. 38 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



247 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Item 






Occupational Skills 


Instruction to be Given 




Types of Reinforced 
Concrete Construction 


What is reinforced concrete — building, arches, shells, domes, 
bridges, bins and tanks — prestressed concrete, distinctive 
structure — reinforced concrete theory. Slip forming for con- 
tinuous pour. 




Application of Steel to 
Individual Members 


Slabs, beams, joists, spandrel beams, columns, piers, footings, 
foundation mats, grade beams, sheet piling, bearing piles, caissons, 
retaining walls, cantilever slabs, cantilever beams, precast plank, 
slabs with hollow cores, double tees, stringers, abutments, wing 
wall single tees, tilt up slabs and fascia panels. 




Reinforcing Bar 
Fabrication 


Grades of steel, deformed or plain bars, standard and special 
sizes, bar lengths and bending; power and hand shears and 
benders, oxy-acetylene equipment, bundling and tagging, bar 
markings and tolerances. 




Application of Welded 
Wire Fabric 


Common style, laps and placing temperature reinforcement, 
main reinforcement of solid slabs, slabs on ground. 




Placing Bars in Structures 


Receiving, checking, sorting preassembled units, handling by 
hand or power, placing according to approved shop drawings, 
bar supports and spacers, lappings, and spHcing, tying and 
welding, repairs, permissible variations, mill scale removal, 
placement in individual members and structures, laying of pans 
and post tensioning of concrete. 




Care and use of tools and 
equipment 


Chokers, slings, hoist signals, scales, and tapes, pliers, wire reel, 
bolt cutter, power shears, bar benders, hickey, oxy-acetylene 
burning and welding equipment, arc welding equipment. 




Inspection 


General, check lists. 




Safety Requirements 


Knowledge of The Construction Safety Act and all safe practices 
of the trade. 




Welding 


Arc and processes other than arc welding or making joints in 
reinforcing steel. 


3 


Curtain Wall 


Total Hours 1070 




Layout and Lines 


Measuring job prior to starting work; establishing centres; 
checking masonry opening, use of plumb lines, dumpy level 
and transit level. 




Handling Materials 


Importance of special care of finished products such as fabricated 
aluminum and stainless steel. Methods of on-site storage of 
curtain wall materials and selection of storage areas. 




Hoisting Materials 


Hoists and tuggers, use of slings, chokers, spreaders, hoisting 
materials, palletised materials, preassembled frames. 




Assembling on the site 


Planning the work, methods to be used, tool and equipment 
requirements, use of sirhple electric tools, drills, screw guns and 
application of sealants to joinery, working from shop drawings 
and auxiliary part lists or bills of materials, recognition of com- 
monly used screws by size and type, recognition of fabrication 
errors or omitted operations, by reference to shop drawings. 



248 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 38 



Column- 



Item 



Column 2 



Occupational Skills 



Instruction to be (iivon 



Loose connection of Curtain 
Wall Sections or Components 

Line-up and Weld 



Alternate Anchoring Systems 
Application of Insulations 

Application of Interior Forms 

Installation of sash into 
Curtain Wall 

Swing stage- work Manual 
and Electric 

Use of caulking and Sealants 



Installation of formed 
Materials 

Application of Protective 
Coatings and Paper 

Installation of Doors, 
Entrances and Louvers 



Installation of Punched 
Opening Frames and Sash 

Installation of Operating Sash 



Paperwork 

Built-up Stages 
Safety Procedures 

Auxiliary Knowledge 



corrective refabrication, knowledge of sizes of drill bits, taps 
and use of rivetting tools, knowledge of application of neoprene 
and poly-vinyl chloride, glazing and thermal separator strips. 
Distribution of assembled sections ready for erection. 

Erection by "stick" system, vertical mullions, horizontals 
spigotted in place. Erection of frame or panel system. 

Aligning and plumbing wall to previously established lines and 
centres. Bolting and shimming to suit. Freezing of anchors 
by welding. Use of level and transit. 

Inserts in concrete, masonry drilling, use of power-actuated tools. 

Perimeter, floor slab, spandrel pan and insulation, types of 
insulations and adhesives used. 

Formed shapes, gutters, use of painted or porcelain enamel trims. 

Hoppertype centre pivotted, double hung. 



How to erect and safety requirements for handling materials 
when working on a stage, appHcation of spandrel panels, exterior 
mullions or trims. Rigging power tools for stage work. Moving 
swing stages. Exterior caulking from a swing stage. 

Knowledge of application method and limitations, use of hand 
caulking tools and air tools. 



Field fitting of copings and soffits. 



When protection necessary. Precautions to be taken, removal 
procedures. 

Methods of frame erection, butt, centre pivotted and off-set 
pivot doors, overhead closers, floor closers, automatic closers, 
glazing procedures for doors. 

Checking opening, levelling and plumbing to ensure optimum 
operation of sash. 

Single and double hung sash. Side hinged, bottom hinged and 
top projected-out casements. Centre pivotted sash. 

Practical reading of architectural and shop drawings, under- 
standing of architectural specifications, co-ordination of shop 
drawings making report in writing from out of town locations. 

Erection Methods. 

Knowledge of The Construction Safety Act and all safe practices of 
the trade. 

Care and cleaning of aluminum and stainless steel ; anodizing, 
extruding of aluminum ; first aid. 



Reg. 38 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



249 





Column 1 


Column 2 


1 1 li M 








Occupational Skills 


Instruction to be Given 


4 


Ornamental and Miscella- 


Total Hours 770 




neous Ironwork 
Drawings 


Reading and understanding of shop drawings. Ability to co- 
ordinate product placement from shop and architectural drawings. 




Layout and Lines 


Checking masonry and concrete openings, establishing column 
centres, wall relations, and fioor heights, use of plumb hnes and 
levels. 




Hoisting Materials 


Use of hoists and tuggers, use of rope and tackle, slings. 




Assembly and Installation 


AssembHng and instalhng by bolting and welding : 
standard stairs and fire escapes, 
spiral stairs, 
steel handrails, 

stainless steel, bronze and aluminum handrails, 
ladders and cages, 

catwalk framing, plate and grating flooring, 
collapsible gates, 
wire screens and grilles, 
wire partitions, 
fences and gates, 
flagpoles, 
mail chutes, 

ferrous and non-ferrous building fascias and panelling, 
canopies, 

doors, entrances and louvers, 
related products. 




Care and clean-up of stainless 
steel and non-ferrous materials 


Use of abrasive and buffing equipment and materials. 




Safety requirements 


Knowledge of The Construction Safety Act and all safe practices of 
the trade. 



O. Reg. 122/67, Sched. 2. 



250 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 39 



REGULATION 39 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



LATHERS 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of lather; 

{b) "lather" means a person who, 

(i) in the construction or repair of walls, 
partitions, ceilings and arches in any 
structure, installs by tying, nailing, 
chpping or welding, wire, metal, or 
wood lath, plaster board or other 
materials and accessories to serve 
as a base for plaster, cement, or 
acoustic material, and erects plastic 
and light metal studs, frames and 
accessories to receive plaster board, 
wire and metal lath, 

but does not include a person who is engaged 
in, 

(ii) the manufacture of equipment or the 
assembly of a unit prior to delivery . 
to a building, structure or site, or 

(iii) the repair and maintenance of the 
installations in an operating in- 
dustrial plant. O. Reg. 171/67, s. 1. 
amended. 

2. The trade of lather is designated as a certified 
trade for the purposes of the Act. O. Reg. 171/67, 
S.2. 

3. An apprentice training program is established 
for the certified trade and shall consist of three periods 
of training and instruction of 1800 hours each, 

(a) at full-time educational day classes provided 
at a College of Applied Arts and Tech- 
nology in the courses contained in Schedule 
1 ; and 

(6) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by an employer of the apprentice in 
the courses contained in Schedule 2. O. 
Reg. 171/67, s. 3, revised. 

4. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the 
certified trade whether for his regular daily hours 
or for hours in excess of his regular daily hours 
shall be not less than, 



(a) 40 per cent for the first period of training and 
instruction ; 

{b) 60 per cent for the second period of training 
and instruction; and 

(c) 80 per cent for the third period of training 
and instruction, 

of the hourly rate of wages or its equivalent for a 
journeyman employed by the same employer in the 
certified trade and with whom the apprentice is 
working. O. Reg. 171/67, s. 4. 

5. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the certified trade shall 
not exceed, 

(a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
trade, one apprentice plus one additional 
apprentice for every five journeymen em- 
ployed by that employer in the trade and 
with whom the apprentice is working ; and 

(b) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the trade, one apprentice for the first jour- 
neyman employed by the employer plus one 
additional apprentice for each additional 
five journeymen employed by that employer 
in the trade and with whom the apprentice 
is working. O. Reg. 171/67, s. 5. 

6. A progress record book shall be issued by the 
Department of Labour to each apprentice for the 
purpose of recording work experience and related 
training time and the apprentice shall be responsible 
for the safekeeping of this progress record book. 
O. Reg. 171/67, s. 6. 

7. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
in the certified trade are the subjects set out in 
schedules 1 and 2. O. Reg. 171/67, s. 7. 

8. Any person who is engaged in the certified trade 
is exempt from subsections 2 and 4 of section 10 of the 
Act. O. Reg. 171/67, s. 8. 

9. A holder of a certificate of quahfication in the 
certified trade is exempt from the provisions of 
sections 22 and 23 of Regulation 33 of Revised 
Regulations of Ontario, 1970. O. Reg. 171/67, s. 9. 



Reg. 39 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



251 



Schedule 1 

LATHERS 
In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instruction to be Given 


1 

2 

3 
4 
5 
6 

7 
8 


Safety 

Materials 

Tools 

Mathematics 

Blueprint Reading and 
Specification 

Lathing Practice 

Lathing and Plastering 
Accessories 

Welding 


Safety practices in the use of scaffolds, planks, tools and 
equipment. Safety equipment and apparel. The Construction 
Safety Act. 

Identification and use of wood, wire and metal lath, gypsum 
board, acoustical suspension materials and accessories. 

Identification, use and care of hand, bench and power tools 
and equipment. 

Measurement, quantity estimating, geometry and such 
mathematics as related to the trade. 

Reading and interpretation of plans, drawings, details, and job 
specifications. 

Design and erection of walls, pilasters, columns, suspended 
ceilings, false beams, arches, groins, domes and other 
architectural designs, and metal furring for acoustics. 

Installation of corner beads, casing beads, expansion and 
screed beads, plaster stops, picture mold, chair rail, base 
screed, metal base, ceiling runners or tracks and similar 
lathing and plastering accessories. 

Electric, gas and spot welding related to the trade. 



O. Reg. 171/67, Sched. 1. 



Schedule 2 

LATHERS 

WORK INSTRUCTION AND EXPERIENCE 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instruction to be Given 


1 

2 
3 


Safety 

Shop Technique 
Materials 


Safety practices in the use of scaffolds, planks, and equip- 
ment. A knowledge of The Construction Safety Act and 
regulations. 

Shop practice relating to the use of hand tools, portable 
tools, power tools and equipment. 

Identification and uses of these materials: Wood, wire and 
metal lath, gypsum boards and acoustic materials and 
accessories. 



252 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 39 



Ititm 


Column 1 


Column 2 




Subject 


Instruction to be Given 


4 


Fastening Systems 


Fastening lathing materials on floors, ceilings, columns, 
pilasters, walls and partitions by nailing, tying, screwing, weld- 
ing, chpping, stapling, adhesives, power tools and other 
application methods. 


5 


Ceiling Systems 


Installation of hangers, carriers, purlins, channel iron and 
metal furring members. Wrapping hangers, carriers, or purlins. 
In the following: 

i. Metal lath suspended systems, 
ii. Metal lath contact systems, 
iii. Gypsum board systems, 
iv. Acoustical systems. 
Arch construction — technique of bending iron. 
Use of levelling equipment to ceilings. 


6 


Wall Systems 


Erection of studs and metal furring members in columns, 
pilasters, walls and partitions. 


7 


Lathing and Plastering 
Accessories 


Installation of corner beads and guards, casing beads, plaster 
stops, picture mold, base screed, metal base, ceiling runners 
or tracks and similar lathing and plastering accessories. 


8 


Exterior Lathing 


Installation of paper and wire, paper backed steeltex, paper and 
metal lath, exterior metal lath and other exterior lathing 
materials. 


9 


Specifications, Blueprint Reading 
and Layout 


On-site application of basic principles, job terminology and 
quantity estimating. 



O. Reg. 171/67, Sched. 2 



Reg. 40 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



253 



REGULATION 40 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



MOTOR VEHICLE MECHANIC 

1. In this Regulation, 

{a) "certified trade" means the trade of motor 
vehicle mechanic ; 

{b) "motor vehicle" means a vehicle propelled 
by an internal combustion engine, or a 
vehicle operated or controlled from a vehicle 
propelled by an internal combustion engine, 
that is registered for use on a highway 
under The Highway Traffic Act and is used 
primarily for the transport of persons, 
equipment or goods, but does not include 
a vehicle, 

(i) operated only on rails, 

(ii) used for transportation solely within 
an employer's actual place of 
business, or 

(iii) used for farming operations but not 
used for carrying a load ; 

(c) "motor vehicle mechanic" means a person 
engaged in the repair and maintenance of 
motor vehicles who, 

(i) disassembles, adjusts, repairs and 
reassembles engines, transmissions, 
clutches, rear ends, differentials, 
brakes, drive shafts, axles and other 
assemblies, 

(ii) tests for and corrects faulty align- 
ment of wheels and steering 
mechanisms, manual or power, 

(iii) repairs or replaces suspension sys- 
tems, including shock absorbers and 
spring assembHes, 

(iv) installs, repairs and removes ignition 
systems, generators, alternators, 
starters, coils, panel instruments, 
wiring and other electrical systems 
and equipment, 

(v) repairs and adjusts fuel systems, 

(vi) performs complete engine tune-ups, 
and 

(vii) installs, inspects, maintains and re- 
moves motor vehicle air-condition- 
ing and refrigeration systems ; 



{d) "related motive power trade" means a trade 
related to the trade of motor vehicle 
mechanic, and includes the trades of align- 
ment and brakes mechanic, fuel and 
electrical systems mechanic, transmission 
mechanic, heavy duty equipment mechanic, 
auto body repairer, truck-trailer repairer, 
service station attendant, automotive 
machinist, automotive painter and motor- 
cycle mechanic. O. Reg. 94/69, s. 1. 

2. A motor vehicle mechanic may also, 

{a) repair, change and balance wheels and tires ; 

{b) change oil in motor vehicles or lubricate 
motor vehicles, including lubricating the 
front wheel bearings and drive shaft; 

(c) supply motor vehicles with anti-freezing 
solutions ; 

{d) replace coohng-system hoses, engine-driven 

belts, and thermostats; 
{e) clean or replace spark plugs ; 

(/) install new or rental batteries or battery 
cables, or recharge batteries ; and 

{g) perform any other duties normally per- 
formed by a service station attendant. 
O. Reg. 94/69, s. 2. 

3. The Trade of motor vehicle mechanic is desig- 
nated as a certified trade for the purposes of the Act. 
O. Reg. 94/69, s. 3. 

4. Notwithstanding anything in this Regulation, a 
person holding a certificate of qualification in a 
related motive power trade is not prohibited from 
performing the duties specified in the Regulation for 
that trade. O. Reg. 94/69, s. 4. 

5. An apprentice training program for the certi- 
fied trade is estabhshed and shall consist of, 

(a) training and instruction at full-time educa- 
tional day classes provided at a College of 
Applied Arts and Technology or in classes 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto ; and 

{b) practical training and instruction provided 
by an employer of the apprentice, 

in the subjects contained in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 94/69, s. 5. 



254 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 40 



6. — (1) Subject to subsections 2 and 3, an appren- 
tice shall complete five periods of training and in- 
struction of 1800 hours per period. 

(2) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma or has 
Ontario Grade 12 standing in English, Mathematics 
and Science or has such other academic qualification 
that, in the opinion of the Director, is equivalent 
thereto, he shall complete five periods of training and 
instruction of 1600 hours per period. 

(3) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma 
majoring in auto mechanics or has such other 
academic qualification that, in the opinion of the 
Director, is equivalent thereto, he shall complete 
five periods of training and instruction of 1200 hours 
per period. O. Reg. 94/69, s. 6. 

7. A person holding a certificate of qualification in 
a related motive power trade may qualify for examina- 
tion for a certificate of quahfication in the trade of 
motor vehicle mechanic by becoming indentured as 
an apprentice in the trade of motor vehicle mechanic 
and completing the following requirements : 

1 . A holder of a certificate of qualification in the 
trade of alignment and brakes mechanic 
shall complete the final three periods of 
training and instruction of 1800 hours per 
period in the subjects contained in the 
Schedule. 

2. A holder of a certificate of quahfication in 
the trade of automotive machinist shall 
complete the final two periods of training 
and instruction of 1800 hours per period in 
the subjects contained in the Schedule. 

3. A holder of a certificate of qualification in 
the trade of fuel and electrical systems 
mechanic shall complete the final three 
periods of training and instructions of 1800 
hours per period in the subjects contained 
in the Schedule. 

4. A holder of a certificate of qualification in 
the trade of heavy duty equipment mechanic 
shall complete the final two periods of train- 
ing and instruction of 1800 hours per period 
in the subjects contained in the Schedule. 

5. A holder of a certificate of quahfication in 
the trade of motorcycle mechanic shall 
complete the final three periods of training 
and instruction of 1800 hours per period 
in the subjects contained in the Schedule. 

6. A holder of a certificate of qualification in 
the trade of transmission mechanic shall 
complete the final three periods of training 
and instruction of 1800 hours per period 
in the subjects contained in the Schedule. 



7. A holder of a certificate of quahfication in 
the trade of truck-trailer repairer shall com- 
plete the final three periods of training and 
instruction of 1800 hours per period in the 
subjects contained in the Schedule. 

8. A holder of a certificate of quahfication in 
the trade of service station attendant who, 

(a) has successfully completed Grade 8 in 
Ontario, or has such other academic 
qualification that, in the opinion of 
the Director, is equivalent thereto, 
shall complete five periods of train- 
ing and instruction of 1800 hours per 
period in the subjects contained in 
the Schedule ; or 

{b) has successfully completed Grade 10 
in Ontario, or has such other aca- 
demic qualification that, in the opin- 
ion of the Director, is equivalent 
thereto, shall complete the final four 
periods of training and instruction 
of 1800 hours per period in the 
subjects contained in the Schedule. 
O. Reg. 94/69, s. 7. 

8. Notwithstanding section 7, a holder of a certi- 
ficate of qualification in the trade of heavy duty 
equipment mechanic may qualify for examination for 
a certificate of qualification in the trade of motor 
vehicle mechanic by submitting written evidence, 
satisfactory to the Director, of having had at least 
two years experience as a journeyman in the trade 
of motor vehicle mechanic. O. Reg. 94/69, s. 8. 

9. Any person who, 

(a) applies in the prescribed form for appren- 
ticeship in the certified trade; and 

(6) becomes an apprentice in the certified trade 
within three months after commencing to 
work in that trade, 

is exempt from subsection 2 of section 10 of the Act. 
O. Reg. 94/69, s. 9. 

10. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the 
certified trade whether for his regular daily hours or 
for hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall not 
be less than, 

{a) 50 per cent during the first period of training 
and instruction ; 

{b) 60 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; 

(c) 70 per cent during tho third period of train- ; 
ing and instruction ; 

(d) 80 per cent during the fourth period of train- 
ing and instruction ; and 



Reg. 40 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



255 



{e) 90 per cent during the fifth period of training 
and instruction, 

of the average rate of wages for journeymen employed 
by the employer in that trade, or where the employer 
is the only journeyman employed, of the average rate 



of wages for journeymen in the area, 
s. 10. 



O. Reg. 94/69 



11. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
are the subjects set out in Parts 1 and 2 of the Schedule. 
O. Reg. 94/69, s. 11. 



Schedule 1 

MOTOR VEHICLE MECHANIC 

Part 1 

In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Mathematics 


Arithmetic 
Geometry 


Addition, subtraction and division of whole numbers 
and fractions, ratio and proportion, areas and 
volumes. 

Lines, planes and angles. 


2 


Science 


Physics 


Basic laws and principles, formulae. (Given as 
required in shop instruction.) 


3 


English 


Basic Usage and 

Business 

Communications 


Trade terminology and usage. Letter and report 
writing. Work and parts orders. Interpretation 
and use of manufacturers' manuals. 


4 


Drafting 


Basic Drafting and 
Interpretation 


Preparation of elementary working drawings and 
dimensioned sketches of automotive components. 
Interpretation of exploded drawings, electrical and 
hydraulic circuits and schematics used in manu- 
facturers' manuals. 


5 


General Shop 
Practice 


Safety 

Hand Tools 
Power Tools 


Safety rules and safe operating procedures. First 
aid. Fire prevention. Use and maintenance of fire- 
fighting equipment. Handling of gasoline, oils and 
cleaning solvents. Danger of carbon monoxide 
fumes. Correct use of lifting and hoisting equip- 
ment. Good housekeeping. 

Selection and use of hammers, punches, chisels, 
pliers, wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers, hacksaws, 
files, drifts, scrapers, snips, clamps, drill bits, 
reamers, vises, taps and dies. Stud extractors. 
Hones. 

Use and care of portable air and electric drills, 
impact tools, grinders, sanders. 



256 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 40 



Item 



Column 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Benchwork 



Measuring 
Instruments 



Fastening Devices 



General Shop 
Equipment 



Cutting with hacksaw, fihng, scraping, driUing, use 
of drill press. Use of bench grinder. Grinding of 
drill bits, chisels, etc. Fitting bearings, bushings; 
honing, cutting and flaring tubing. Soldering, 
gasket making. Oxy-acetylene and arc welding and 
cutting. Brazing techniques. Care and main- 
tenance of welding equipment. 

Use of rules, straight edges and squares. Feeler 
gauges, calipers, verniers, micrometers, telescopic 
gauges, dial indicators, trammel gauges, pressure 
gauges. 

Purpose and types of bolts, nuts, studs, screws and 
tube fittings. Thread identification and classifica- 
tion. Tensile strengths. Installation procedures. 
Tightening torques. Cutting internal and external 
threads. Removing broken studs. "Heh-Coil" 
inserts. Purpose and types of rivets, keys, springs, 
fiat and lock washers, snap rings, circlips, cotter 
pins. Installation and removal. Thread lubricants, 
sealers and locking compounds. 

Capacities and correct usage of floor cranes, hoists, 
jacks, stands, hydraulic presses, pullers. Power 
hacksaws. Operation and maintenance of degreas- 
ing and steamcleaning equipment. Operation and 
maintenance of air compressors. Capacities and use 
of tow trucks and related vehicle recovery equip- 
ment. 



Internal 

Combustion 

Engines 



Principles, Types and 
Definitions 



Engine Components 



Principles of operation. 2 and 4 stroke cycles. 
Engine types — single and multi-cyhnder, in-hne, 
slanted, "V" types, flat or pan-cake. Definition of 
bore, stroke, combustion, piston displacement, 
clearance volume, swept volume, compression ratios 
and pressures, horsepower, torque. Engine formulae. 
Heat transfer. Combustion chamber design and 
efficiency. 

Types and function of major engine components: 
cyhnder blocks, cylinder heads, pistons and rings, 
wrist pins, connecting rods. Bearings, crankshafts, 
valves and guides, valve trains, camshafts, timing 
gears or chains, gaskets, manifolds, flywheels and 
ring gears. Vacuum and compression tests; valve 
lash. DisassembUng, cleaning, inspecting, repair, 
reconditioning or replacement. Boring, honing, 
grinding and aligning operations. Reassembly 
sequence for engines and components. Fits, clear- 
ances and tolerances. Torquing. Valve timing. 
Engine testing procedures. 



Reg. 40 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



257 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Cours 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Types and 
Classification of 
Lubricants 



Lubricating Systems 



Cooling Systems 



Fuel Systems 



Fuel Injection 
Systems 



Fuel Systems 
(Liquefied Petroleum 
Gas and Vaporizing 
Oils) 



Characterisitcs of lubricants' Detergent, non- 
detergent. S.A.E. viscosity ratings, A.P.I, classi- 
fication. Additives. Oil contamination and deterio- 
ration. 

Types of engine lubricating systems ; wet sump, dry 
sump, fuel/oil mix, pressure, splash and dip feeds. 
Gear, plunger and vane type pumps; screens and 
filters; full-flow and by-pass types. Pressure indica- 
tion and control. Crankcase ventilation. Servicing 
and overhaul procedures. 

Air and hquid cooled systems. Blowers, water 
pumps, fans and drives. Radiators. Thermostats. 
Hoses and connections. Temperature indicators. 
Automatic transmission coolers. Pressurized sys- 
tems. Coolant, additives, sealers, and anti-freeze. 
Cleaning agents. Reverse flushing. Radiator flow 
testing. Immersion heaters. System repair and 
overhaul procedures. 

Mechanical fuel/vacuum and electric pumps. Pres- 
sure, volume and vacuum tests. Tanks and supply 
lines. Repair and overhaul procedures. Carbure- 
tion; Fuel/air ratio. Characteristics of carburetors. 
Single, double and 4 barrel types. Up-draft, side 
and down draft, etc. Carburetor operation ; atomiza- 
tion, vapourization, weight of fuel and air, venturi. 
Carburetor circuits and systems. Float, choke, idle, 
main-metering, power and accelerating circuits. 
Heat riser valves, heat insulators and choke tubes. 
Cleaning and overhaul procedures. Cleaning sol- 
vents. Effects of carburetor adjustments on engine 
performance. Tachometer and vacuum gauges. 
Effects of percolation, altitude and atmospheric 
changes, valve overlap and excess heat, incorrect 
float level. Balancing multi-carburetors. Adjust- 
ments to electrical mechanisms, switches, operating 
linkage. Effect on automatic transmission opera- 
tion. Locating excess vacuum leaks. Torquing 
intake manifolds. Effect of air cleaners on engine 
performance. Analyzing exhaust gases. Relation- 
ship between air/fuel mixture and exhaust gas. 
Tune-up procedures. Testing and maintaining posi- 
tive crankcase ventilation systems, dash pots, throttle 
return checks, anti-stall devices. 

Characteristics and operation of fuel injection sys- 
tems, injectors and pumps. Governors. Fuel filters. 
Servicing and overhauhng fuel injection systems. 
Test equipment and test procedures. Cleanliness. 
Fuel injection timing. Air induction systems. 
Starting systems. Shutting down runaway engines. 

Use and operation of L.P.G. systems. Charging 
L.P.G. tanks. Principles of operation using vaporiz- 
ing, oils. 



258 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 40 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Belt Drives 



"V" Belt 
Installation 



Ignition Coils 



Primary Circuit 
Switches and 
Resistors 

Primary and 
Secondary Circuits 



Transistor and 
Transistorized 
Ignition Systems 



Spark Plugs 



D.C. Charging 

Systems 

(Generators) 



Regulators 



A.C. Charging 

Systems 

(Alternators) 



Characteristics of "V" Belts, 
and adjusting. 



Inspecting, instaUing 



Characteristics and function. Coil polarity, secon- 
dary voltage range, internal and external resistors, 
temperature effects. Saturation period and coil 
output. Coil Testing equipment; output, insulation 
and polarity tests. 

Characteristics. Safety features — automatic trans- 
mission and theft protection. By-passing primary 
circuit resistance for starting. 

Testing primary and secondary circuits. Effects of 
suppression equipment on tests. Arcing corrosion. 
Replacing of primary and high tension wiring. 

Characteristics and application of diodes and tran- 
sistors used in automotive ignition systems. Tran- 
sistor and transistorized systems. Fundamentals of 
operation. Timing procedures. Test equipment. 
Testing and repair procedures. 

Characteristics and operation. Ionization, negative 
polarity, temperature control and heat ranges. 
Radio suppression. Analyzing deposits. Testing, 
cleaning, filing, setting and instalHng. Tightening 
torques. 

Characteristics. Internally and externally grounded 
fields. Positive and negative grounded systems. 
Generator construction. Principles of generator 
operation. Electro-magnetic induction. Electrical 
and magnetic circuits. Commutation. 

Construction features. 2 and 3 unit, double contact, 
heavy duty and carbon pile regulators. Principles 
of operation. Voltage and current regulation; 
cut-out relays. Temperature compensation. 

Characteristics. Internally and externally grounded 
fields. Positive and negative ground systems. In- 
ternally and externally ground systems. Alter- 
nator construction ; principles of operation. Electro- 
magnetic induction. Electrical circuits ("Y" and 
delta). Magnetic circuits. Rectification. Current 
Hmitation. A.C. regulators and relays; vibrating 
contact, transistorized, transistor types. Principles 
of regulator and relay operation. Voltage regulators, 
field relays, indicator light relays. Temperature 
compensation. 



Reg. 40 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



259 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Exhaust Systems 



Mufflers, Resonators, 
Exhaust and Tail 
Pipes 



Features of exhaust systems, single, dual and resona- 
tors with mufflers. Dual exhaust systems, cross-over 
pipes and heat riser passages. Back pressure checks. 
Emission control systems; Inspection and servicing. 
Characteristics of insulators, hangers, brackets and 
clamps. Replacing complete exhaust systems or 
parts. Expansion and contraction. Stress relieving 
of system. Exhaust gas leaks. 



Electrical 
Systems 



Basic Electricity 



Automotive 
Electrical Circuits 



Switches and 
Instruments 



Batteries 



Ignition Systems 

(Conventional 

Distributors) 



Definition of amperes, voltage, resistance. Ohm's 
Law. Electron flow. Electro-magnetism. Series 
and parallel circuits. Voltage drop. Use of volt- 
meter, ammeter and ohmmeter. Conductors and 
insulators. 

Characteristics of typical circuits. Voltages and 
currents. Ground circuits. Automotive wire and 
cables. Insulation materials. Flexibility. Resis- 
tance. Joining, splicing and soldering of wires and 
cables. Insulating. Removal and installation of 
terminals, connectors and plugs. Effects of tem- 
perature, shorts, grounds, poor connections. Resis- 
tances and fuses. Identification and tracing of 
circuits. 

Function of automotive electrical switches, relays 
and instruments. Indicator lights. Rheostats, 
resistors, capacitors and semi-conductors. Test, 
repair and replacement procedures. 

Principles, characteristics and function of lead acid 
batteries. Electro-chemical action. Electrolyte. 
Voltage developed. Ampere hour ratings. Sulfa- 
tion. Inspection, testing and maintenance. Use of 
voltmeters, ammeters, load resistances and hydro- 
meters. Battery charging. Charging rates. Charg- 
ing and handling hazards. Dry-charged batteries. 
Activation procedures. 

Function, mounting and driving of distributors. 
Single, tandem, double headed, dual contact points, 
impulse generators for semi-conductor systems, etc. 
Internal electrical circuits, Cam lobes, single and 
double contact points, dwell angle, condensers. 
Centrifugal and vacuum advance. Secondary vol- 
tage distribution. Radio suppression. Ignition 
timing; Distributor tests on and off vehicle. Dis- 
tributor inspection and overhaul procedures. Re- 
placement of shafts and bushings; contact point 
cleaning, replacement and adjustment, alignment 
and spring tension, gap-dwell settings; lubrication of 
cams, pivots and advance mechanisms. Installation 
and timing. Synchronizing dual points and distribu- 
tors. Engine speed settings. 



260 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 40 



Column 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Inspection, Testing, 
Repair and Overhaul 



Starter Motors 



Special Starting 
Systems 



Lights 



Horns 



Electric Windshield 
Wipers 



Windshield Washers 



Power-Assist 
Systems 



Inspection and test procedures for generators, alter- 
nators, regulators, relays, wiring and ground cir- 
cuitry. On and off-vehicle tf^"' . Removing, dis- 
assembling, cleaning, overhc-i^ung, testing and re- 
installing generators, alternators, regulators and 
relays. Cleaning agents. Lubricants. Polarizing 
generator. Contact cleaning, replacing and adjust- 
ing. Air gap adjustments. Replacing transistors 
and diodes. Bench testing and adjustment of regu- 
lators and relays. 

Characteristics. Construction features. Principles 
of operation. Electro-magnetism. Electric circuits, 
magnetic circuits. Series and compound cranking 
motors. Commutation. Operation of starter motor 
drive units. Bendix, Dyer, over-running clutch, etc.. 
Flywheel ring gears. Operation of motor solenoids 
and switches. Solenoid circuits. Neutral safety 
switch. Inspecting and testing starting circuits; 
motors, solenoids, cables and wiring. Removing, 
disassembling, cleaning, overhauling, testing and 
reinstalHng. Cleaning agents. Lubricants. Testing 
and servicing component parts of motor. 

Operating principles. Series parallel switches. Series 
parallel and magnetic switch systems. Diesel fuel 
preheating systems (Glow Plugs). Testing and 
repairing or replacing components. 

Type and characteristics of lights. Rating of bulbs 
and seal beam units. Candle power, and wattage. 
Lenses and holders. Signal lights ; flasher units, radio 
interference. Series and parallel circuits. Circuit 
fuses. Ground circuits. Aiming, testing, installing 
and repairing lights. 

Characteristics. Electric and air/vacuum types. 
Horn operation. Electrical circuits and relays. 
Amperage draw. Air/vacuum horn controls. Fuses. 
Inspecting and adjusting horns. 

Characteristics and operation; electric single and 
multi-speed and vacuum types. Drives and linkage. 
Arms and blades. Speed control. Fuses. Washer 
cycling. Overhaul and repair procedures. Replacing 
and adjusting wiper blades and arms. 

Characteristics. Automatic operation and cycling. 
Manual operation. Installing, repairing or replacing 
windshield washers and controls. 

Characteristics of electrical and electro-hydraulic 
power-assist mechanisms and circuits. Windows, 
tail-gates, convertible tops, seats, etc. Inspection, 
servicing and overhaul. 



Reg. 40 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



261 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Heaters and 
Defrosters 



Types, characteristics and operation. Component 
features. Testing, adjustment, or replacement of 
blower motors, actuating and control systems. 



10 



Power Trains 



Clutches 



Standard 
Transmissions 



Automatic 
Transmissions 



Characteristics and construction features; single 
plate, multi-plate, etc. Function of controls: mecha- 
nical, hydraulic, vacuum, air and electrically oper- 
ated. Adjustments. Removal, disassembly, in- 
spection and overhaul of clutches and components. 
Cleaning methods. Assembly lubricants. Clutch 
reinstallation. Aligning procedures. Control ad- 
justment. Clearances. Testing. 

Characteristics of spur gears, planetary gears (over- 
drives), synchronizing mechanisms, over-running 
clutches, dog clutches and internal shift mechanisms. 
'Characteristics of manual shift transmissions (pas- 
senger vehicles, commercial vehicles), overdrive 
units and auxiliary transmissions. Gear ratios. 
Transmission control mechanisms; direct, remote 
and assist mechanisms. Servicing and adjusting. Lu- 
brication. Oil seahng and venting. Removal of 
transmissions and controls. Construction features 
of transmission components. Overhauling trans- 
missions, Hnkages and controls. Cleanliness. In- 
spection procedures. Serviceabihty of parts and 
.components. Maintaining operating relationship of 
parts. Gear and sphne fits. Reinstallation and 
adjusting controls. 

Characteristics and construction features. Trans- 
mission cooUng. Mechanical, electrical, vacuum 
operated controls. Principles of operation of plane- 
tary gears, friction clutches, over-running clutches, 
servos, bands and drums, fluid couplings and torque 
converters. Hydraulic components and circuits. 
Transmission fluids. Draining, refilling, and level 
checking procedures. Oil seals and vents. Shop 
test procedures ; performance characteristics : shifting, 
non-shifting. Specifications. Band and linkage 
adjustments, control settings, checking external con- 
nections and fluid levels prior to tests. Effects of 
defective engines, related components and worn 
parts on transmission operation. Tools and testing 
equipment. Pressure testing transmission oil cir- 
cuits ; interpretation of results. Locating fluid leaks. 
Fluid characteristics due to burnt clutch or band 
lining. Air testing transmission circuits and units 
with controls partially disassembled. Stall testing 
transmissions. Testing oil-coolers. Effects of 
leaks. Results of introducing air into pressure cir- 
cuits. Overhauling automatic transmissions. Pre- 
disassembly inspection. Removal and replacement. 
Tools and equipment for handling and Ufting auto- 



262 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 40 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Drive Shafts 

Axles and 
Differentials 

Axle Bearings and 
Oil Seals 


matic transmissions. Gauges and test equipment. 
Marking and protecting parts during disassembly. 
Cleanliness. Cleaning solvents. Inspection of parts. 
Tolerance specifications. Fits and clearances. Tor- 
quing procedures. Air testing components on re- 
assembly. Road and dynamometer tests. 

Characteristics; open drive shafts, support bearings, 
universal joints, sUp joints and enclosed drive Unes. 
Disassembly, overhaul or relubing, reassembly and 
reinstallation. Torquing. Effects of imbalance. 

Characteristics; multi-speed, tandem drive, trans 
axles, Umited sHp differentials, trailing axles, front 
driving axles. Gear ratios. Testing axle and differ- 
ential operation. Methods of controlling front and 
rear axles, and differentials. Servicing, overhauling 
and adjusting axle and differential control mechan- 
isms; Mechanical, electrical, air or vacuum operated. 
Removing, overhauling and reinstalling axles and 
differentials. Reassembling crown gears and pinions. 
Backlash and tooth contact. Gear match marking. 
BrineUing effects. Alignment of housings. Bearing 
preload. Lubrication. Oil seahng and venting. 

Characteristics of axle bearings. Ball and roller 
types. Removing, relubing, replacing, adjusting or 
torquing. Characteristics of oil seals. Replacement 
methods. 


11 


Suspension 
Systems 


Front End Geometry 

Front Suspension 
(Solid Axle) 

Leaf Springs 

Front and Rear 

Independent 

Suspension 


Purpose and definition of caster, camber, toe-in, 
toe-out, ball joint or kingpin inclination. Diagnosis 
of alignment problems. 

Application of soUd axles. Elliot and Reverse 
Elliot. Construction characteristics, servicing and 
straightening procedures. 

Characteristics of leaf springs, mountings and related 
parts — single leaf, multi-leaf and helper springs. 
Inspection for wear, damage and distortion. Remov- 
ing, overhauling and reinstalling springs and related 
parts. Lubrication. 

Characteristics of front and rear independent sus- 
pension systems: coil spring, torsion bar, leaf spring 
and air-hydraulic. Ball-joint types. Inspecting 
suspension components. Acceptable wear Hmits. 
Characteristics of shock absorbers, stabilizers and 
radius rods. Overhaul of suspensions and related 
parts. Torquing. Lubrication. Sealed systems. 



Reg. 40 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



263 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Front and Rear 
Suspension Systems 
(Commercial Vehicles) 

Wheels and Rims 
Tires and Tubes 

Wheel and Tire 
Balancing 


Characteristics of commercial vehicle suspensions: 
leaf spring, coil spring, torsion bar, rubber and air 
cushion types, etc. Hangers and suspension control 
rods. Overhauling of suspensions and related com- 
ponents. Realignment on reassembly. Lubrica- 
tion. 

Types, sizes and characteristics. Wheel to hub 
fastenings and locating devices. Removing and re 
installing wheels and rims. Correct jacking points. 
Inspecting, repairing and servicing wheels and rims. 
Run-out. 

Types, sizes, characteristics and construction. Tire 
demounting and mounting methods; equipment and 
lubricants. Tire, tube and valve repair. Tire in- 
flation precautions. Identification of tire wear and 
irregularities. Inspection for damage and faults. 
Tire rotation. Retreaded tires. 

Static and dynamic balance. Wheel balancing 
equipment. Balancing wheels and related parts. 


12 


Brake Systems 


Service Brakes 
Parking Brakes 


Types, function and principles of brake actuating 
devices ; Manual and power assisted. Characteristics 
of brake operating systems; Hydrauhc, vacuum- 
hydraulic, air-hydrauUc, air, etc. Operation of 
system components. Inspection procedures. Dis- 
assembling and assembling of system components. 
Cleaning procedures. Assembly lubricants. Re- 
Hning brake shoes. Reconditioning brake drums, 
and brake discs. Reconditioning wheel cyhnders and 
master cylinders. Flushing or bleeding system. 
Flushing agents and approved fluids. Cleanhness. 
Servicing and adjustment of brakes. Clearances. 
Control valve adjustments and settings. Servicing 
tools and equipment. Road testing. 

Principles of brake actuating systems and com- 
ponents. Disassembly, inspection and assembly of 
components. Adjusting and testing. 


13 


Frames 


Standard Type 
Frames 


Types, construction and characteristics of frames, 
X-frame, ladder type, perimeter type. Frame dam- 
age; diamond, sag, twist, sway and kick-up. Frame 
damage inspection. Measuring tools and equip- 
ment. Straightening and alignment equipment. 
Frame realignment methods and hook-ups. Cross- 
member replacement techniques. Rivetting, welding 
and bolting frame members. Heat straightening of 
frame members. Improper repairs or modification of 
frames. 



264 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 40 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Unitized Construction 


Characteristics of unitized frames and suspension 
mountings. Effects of unitized frame damage. In- 
spection methods. Measuring tools and equipment. 
Straightening and alignment equipment. Replace- 
ment and realignment of underbody sections. Heat 
straightening. Seahng, painting and insulating. 
Simultaneous front end alignment check, for proofing. 


14 


Steering Systems 


Manual Types 
Power Types 

Steering Linkage 
and Alignment 


Construction characteristics of cam and lever, worm 
and roller, worm and sector, rack and pinion and 
recirculating ball types of steering gears. Gear shift 
controls and attached mechanisms. Adjustment 
methods. Lubricants. Oil sealing. Removal, 
overhaul, replacement of steering columns and box 
assemblies. 

Construction features and characteristics of integral 
and linkage types of power steering systems. Oil 
seals and vents. Types of Fluid; capacities, filling 
and bleeding systems. Inspecting and adjusting 
pump drives and belts. Testing system pressures 
and valve operations. Adjustment and centering of 
control valves. Tools, gauges and equipment. Over- 
hauling power steering systems. Cleaning methods. 
Cleanliness. Removing, replacing steering assembly. 
Alignment and adjustment of steering gear boxes, 
columns and attached mechanisms. 

Types and characteristics of steering hnkages, bush- 
ings and joints. Factors affecting wheel alignment. 
Use of tools, gauges and equipment to measure 
caster, camber, balljoint or kingpin inchnation, 
turning angles and toe-in. Correcting alignment 
angles; adjustment, shimming or bending. Correc- 
tion sequence. Inspecting and overhauling steering 
linkage and joints. Securing and locking steering 
components. Lubrication. Lubricant. Sealed 
systems. Road testing. 


15 


Air-conditioning 
and Refrigeration 
Systems 


Refrigeration 
Principles 

System Components 

Inspection and 
Maintenance 


Heat transfer; conduction, convection, radiation. 
British thermal units. Latent heat of vaporization; 
effects of liquid change to vapor and vapor to liquid. 
Effects of pressure on boiling point and condensation. 
Refrigerant. The basic refrigeration system. Air 
induction and condensation removal systems. 

Types, characteristics and operation. Drive units, 
compressors and clutch drives, condensers, receivers, 
expansion valves, evaporators, control valves, ther- 
mostatic controls, blowers, electrical circuits. 
Refrigerant (Freon - 12), refrigeration oils, pressure 
hnes and fittings. 

Safety precautions and correct use of safety equip- 
ment. 



Reg. 40 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



265 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 








Inspection, testing, adjustment, overhaul and re- 
placement procedures. Use of gauges and test 
equipment. Importance of exercising systems. Oil 
level checks and replenishment procedures. Testing 
for leaks. Purging, evacuating and recharging pro- 
cedures. Procedures for installation and removal of 
motor vehicle air-conditioning and refrigeration 
systems. 



Part 2 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 




General Shop 
Practice 


General 


Safety rules and removal of all safety hazards. 

Use of hand and power tools, measuring instruments, 

fastening devices and general shop equipment. 

Benchwork operations. 

(As detailed in Part 1.) 


2 


Internal 

Combustion 

Engines 


Operation, Testing 
and Adjustment 

Engine 
Reconditioning 

Lubricants 
Lubricating Systems 


Familiarization with engines types, components and 
correct operation. Recognition of abnormal engine 
noises and causes. Vacuum and compression testing. 
Identification of effects of cylinder wear, defective 
valves, gaskets and incorrect valve timing on engine 
performance. Torquing heads and manifolds. Ad- 
justing valve lash. 

Engine and component disassembly; cleaning, in- 
spection, repair, reconditioning or replacement. 
Boring, honing, grinding, alignment and fitting 
operations. Reassembly of engines and compo- 
nents. Fits, clearances and tolerances. Torquing. 
Valve timing. Engine testing. 

FamiHarization with lubricant characteristics, classi- 
fications and ratings; contamination and deteriora- 
tion, frequency of change intervals. 

Familiarization with types, operation and require- 
ments. Servicing, overhaul or replacement of pumps, 
screens, oil lines and filters. Testing, servicing and 
adjustment of pressure indicators and controls and 

positive crankcase ventilation systems. 



266 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 40 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Ttfm 










Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Cooling Systems 


Air and liquid cooled pressurized systems. 
Inspection, testing, overhaul or replacement of 
blowers, fans, water pumps, drives, radiators and 
caps, thermostats, hoses and connections, tempera- 
ture indicators, immersion and hot water heaters, 
automatic transmission oil coolers. Radiator reverse 
flushing and flow-testing; use of cleaning agents, 
coolant additives, sealers. Testing anti-freeze solu- 
tions. 






Fuel Systems 


Mechanical- fuel/vacuum and electric pumps. Tests 






(Gasoline) 


for pressure, vacuum and volume. Repair, overhaul 
or replacement of pumps, tanks and supply lines. 
Familiarization with principles of carburetion and 
characteristics of carburetors, types, operation, cir- 
cuits and systems; heat riser valves, heat insulators, 
choke tubes, dash pots, throttle return checks, anti- 
stall devices and air cleaners. Testing, adjusting, 
cleaning and overhaul operations. 






Tune-Up and 


Use of electrical analyzers, vacuum gauges, tacho- 






Test Procedures 


meters and timing lights to adjust idle speeds and 
mixtures, analyze exhaust gases, locate excess va- 
cuum leaks, balance multi-carburetors, check and 
/:orrect ignition timing and operation, adjust elec- 
trical mechanisms, switches and operating linkage. 
Dynamometer testing to determine engine horse- 
power and torque output. 






Fuel Injection 


Servicing and overhauling fuel injection systems. 






Systems 


Test equipment and testing operations. Injection 
timing. Servicing and overhauUng starting systems. 
Shutting down runaway engines. 






Fuel Systems 


Use and operation of liquefied petroleum gas and 






(Liquefied Petroleum 


vaporizing oil systems. Charging L.P.G. tanks. 






Gas and 








Vaporizing Oils) 




3 


Belt Drives 


"V" Belts 


Inspecting, instaUing and adjusting. 


4 


Exhaust Systems 


Mufflers, Resonators, 


Back pressure checks. Replacing complete exhaust 






Exhaust and Tail 


systems or parts. Stress relieving. Emission con- 






Pipes 


trol systems ; inspection and servicing. 


5 


Electrical 


Automotive Electrical 


Identification, tracing and testing of circuits. Use of 




Systems 


Circuits 


voltmeters, ammeters and ohmmeters. Joining, 
splicing and soldering wires and cables. Insulating. 
Removal and installation of terminals, connectors, 
plugs, resistances and fuses. 






Switches and 


Switches, relays and instruments, indicator lights, 






Instruments 


rheostats, resistors, capacitors and semi-conductors. 
Testing, repair and replacement. 



Reg. 40 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



267 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Item 








Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Batteries 


Inspection, testing and maintenance. Use of volt- 
meters, ammeters, load resistances and hydrometers. 
Battery charging. Activation of dry-charged bat- 
teries. 






Ignition Systems 

(Conventional 

Distributors) 


Single, tandem, double headed, dual contact points, 
impulse generators (semi-conductor systems), etc. 
Distributor tests on an off vehicle. Inspection and 
overhaul procedures. Replacement of shafts and 
bushings. Contact point cleaning, replacement and 
adjustment. Lubrication. Testing and replacement 
of condensers, rotors, caps, centrifugal and vacuum 
advance mechanisms and radio suppressors. Instal- 
lation and timing. Synchronizing dual points and 
distributors. Engine speed adjustments. 






Ignition Coils 


Inspection, testing and replacement; output, insula- 
tion and polarity tests. 






Primary and 
Secondary Circuits 


Testing primary and secondary circuits. Replace- 
ment of primary and high tension wiring, primary 
circuit switches and resistors. 






Transistor and 
Transistorized 
Ignition Systems 


Familiarization with principles of operation. Ig- 
nition timing. Use of test equipment. Testing, 
repair and overhaul procedures. 






Spark Plugs 


Types, temperature control and heat ranges. Ana- 
lyzing deposits. Testing, cleaning, gapping and 
instalHng. Torquing. 






Charging Systems 
D.C. (Generators) 
A.C. (Alternators) 


Inspection and testing of generators, alternators, 
regulators, relays, wiring and ground circuitry. On 
and off vehicle tests. Removing, disassembling, 
cleaning, overhauHng, testing and reinstalling gen- 
erators, alternators, regulators and relays. Lubrica- 
tion. Polarizing generator. Contact cleaning, re- 
placement and adjusting. Air gap adjustments. 
Replacing transistors and diodes. Bench testing and 
adjustment of regulators and relays. 






Starter Motors 


Inspecting and testing starting circuits, motors, 
drive units, switches, solenoids, cables and wiring. 
Removing, disassembhng, cleaning, overhauling, 
testing and reinstaUing. Lubrication. 






Special Starting 
Systems 


Series parallel and magnetic switch systems. Diesel 
fuel preheating systems (Glow plugs). Testing, 
repairing or replacing components. 






Lights 


Lighting circuits. Bulbs and seal beam units. 
Lenses and holders. Signal lights; flasher units. 
Aiming, testing, installing and repairing lights and 
wiring. 



268 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 40 



Column 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Work Instruction and Experience 



Heaters and 
Defrosters 

Horns 



Windshield Wipers 



Windshield Washer 



Power-Assist 
Systems 



Testing, adjustment or replacement of blower 
motors, actuating or control systems. 

Electric and air/vacuum types. Electrical circuits 
and relays. Air/vacuum horn controls. Testing, 
adjusting, or replacement. 

Electric single and multi-speed and vacuum types. 
Speed controls and washer cycling. Overhaul, repair 
or replacement. 

Installing, repairing or replacing windshield washers 
and controls. Aiming fluid nozzles. 

Inspection, servicing and overhaul of electrical and 
electro-hydrauhc power assist mechanisms and cir- 
cuits; windows, tailgates, convertible tops, seats, etc. 



Power Trains 



Clutches 



Standard 
Transmissions 



Automatic 
Transmissions 



Drive shafts 



Single and multiplate; mechanical, hydraulic, va- 
cuum, air and electrically operated controls; ser- 
vicing and adjustment. Removal, disassembly, 
cleaning, inspection, overhauling and reinstallation. 
Control adjustments and clearances. Testing. 

Standard transmissions; direct and remote controls, 
power assist mechanisms, over drives, auxiliary 
drives. Servicing and adjustment. Removal, dis- 
assembly, cleaning, inspection, overhaul and reinstal- 
lation. Control adjustments. Lubrication. Testing. 

Shop testing; preliminary band and Hnkage adjust- 
ments; mechanical, electrical and vacuum control 
settings ; checking of external connections and fluid 
levels. Familiarization with performance charac- 
teristics and specifications. Pressure testing trans- 
mission oil circuits; locating fluid leaks; interpreta- 
tion of results. Air testing circuits and units (con- 
trols partially disassembled). Testing oil coolers. 
Stall testing automatic transmissions. Transmission 
removal. Pre-disassembly inspection. Disassem- 
bly, cleaning, inspection and overhaul procedures 
for planetary gears, friction clutches, over-running 
clutches, servos, bands and drums, fluid couplings, 
torque converters and hydraulic components. Tor- 
quing procedures. Air testing components on re- 
assembly. Reinstallation of transmissions; control 
adjustments and settings. Road and dynamometer 
testing. 

Open drive shafts, support bearings, universal joints, 
slip joints. Enclosed drive lines. Removal, dis- 
assembly, overhaul, reassembly and reinstallation. 
Torquing. 



Reg. 40 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



269 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Axles and 
Differentials 

Axle Bearings and 
Oil Seals 


Testing axle and differential operation. Servicing, 
overhauling and adjusting axle and differential con- 
trol mechanisms; mechanical, electrical, air or 
vacuum operated. Removing, overhauhng and re- 
installing axles and differentials. Lubrication. 

Removing, relubing, replacing, adjusting or torquing. 
Oil seal replacement. 


7 


Suspension 
Systems 


Front Suspension 
(Solid Axle) 

Leaf Springs 

Front and Rear 

Independent 

Suspensions 

Front and Rear 
Suspension Systems 
(Commercial Vehicles) 

Wheels and Rims 

Tires, Tubes and 
Valves 

Wheel and Tire 
Balancing 


Axle removal, overhaul and reinstallation. Straight- 
ening operations; Correction' of caster, camber and 
king-pin inclination. Lubrication. 

Single leaf, multi-leaf and helper springs; mountings 
and related components. Inspecting, removing, 
overhauling and reinstalHng. Lubrication. 

Coil and leaf spring, torsion bar and air-hydrauhc 
systems. Suspension mountings. Tramming dimen- 
sions. Overhaul of suspensions and related com- 
ponents; shock absorbers, stabilizers and radius rods. 
Removing compressed springs and related parts. 
Replacing bushings; maintaining preloading. Tor- 
sion bar replacement. Torquing suspension com- 
ponents assembly reahgnment. Lubrication; sealed 
systems. 

Leaf and coil spring, torsion bar, rubber and air 
cushion types. Overhaul of suspensions and related 
components, hangers and suspension control rods. 
Assembly realignment. Lubrication. 

Removal, repair, servicing and reinstallation. 
Handling equipment. Checking run-out. 

Demounting, inspection, repair and mounting. 
Equipment and lubricants. Tire inflation pre- 
cautions. Recognition of tire wear, faults and mis- 
alignment. Tire rotation. 

Use of on and off vehicle balancing equipment. 
Installation of weights. 


8 


Brake Systems 


Service Brakes 


Manual and power assisted; hydraulic, vacuum- 
hydraulic, air-hydraulic, air operated. Disassembly, 
inspection, overhaul or reconditioning and reinstal- 
lation. 

Cleaning operations. Relining brake shoes. Recon- 
ditioning brake drums and discs, wheel cylinders and 
master cylinders. Flushing and bleeding systems. 
Flushing agents. Approved fluids. Servicing and 
adjustment. Control valve adjustments and settings. 
Road testing. 



270 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 40 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Parking Brakes 


Brake actuating systems and components. Inspec- 
tion, overhaul or reconditioning. Adjusting and 
testing. 


9 


Frames 


Standard Type 

Unitized 
Construction 


Determination of frame damage. Inspection. Frame 
straightening and alignment. Rivetting, welding 
and bolting frame members. Cross member replace- 
ment. Heat straightening. 

Damage inspection. Straightening and alignment. 
Replacement and reahgnment of underbody sec- 
tions and suspension mountings. Front end align- 
ment proofing check. Heat straightening. Sealing, 
painting and insulating. 


10 


Steering Systems 


Manual Types 
Power Types 

Steering Linkage 
and Alignment 


Cam lever, worm and roller, worm and sector, rack 
and pinion, recirculating ball types. Gear shift 
controls and attached mechanisms. Removal, over- 
haul and reinstallation of steering box and column 
assemblies. Lubrication. Alignment and adjust- 
ment. Road testing. 

Integral and hnkage types. Filling and bleeding 
systems. Approved fluids. Adjusting pump drives 
and belts. Testing pressures and valve operation. 
Adjustment and centering of control valves. Center- 
ing steering on high point. Removal, overhaul and 
reinstallation of power steering systems. Alignment 
and adjustment. Road testing. 

Use of gauges and equipment to measure caster, 
camber, ball joint or king-pin inclination, turning 
angles and toe-in. Correction of alignment angles 
by adjustment, shimming or bending. Correction 
sequence. Inspection and overhaul of steering link- 
age and joints. Securing and locking steering com- 
ponents . Lubrication ; sealed systems . Road testing . 


11 


Air-Conditioning 
and Refrigeration 
Systems 


Inspection and 
Maintenance 


FamiUarization with safety precautions and use of 
safety equipment. Inspection, testing, adjustment, 
overhaul or replacement of drive units, compressors 
and clutch drives, condensers, receivers, expansion 
valves, evaporators, control valves, thermostatic 
controls, blowers, electrical circuits, pressure Hnes 
and fittings, refrigerant. Oil level checks and re- 
plenishment. Purging, evacuating and recharging 
operations. Installation and removal of motor 
vehicle air-conditioning and refrigeration systems. 



O. Reg. 94/69, Sched. 



Reg. 41 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



271 



REGULATION 41 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



MOTORCYCLE MECHANIC 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of motor- 
cycle mechanic ; 

{b) "motorcycle" means a self-propelled 
vehicle, 

(i) having a seat or saddle for the use of 
the driver and designed to travel on 
not more than three wheels in con- 
tact with the ground, and includes a 
bicycle with a motor attached and a 
motor scooter, and 

(ii) that is registered for use on a high- 
way under The Highway Traffic A ct ; 

(c) "motorcycle mechanic" means a person 
who repairs, disassembles, assembles or 
maintains motorcycles and tests them for 
faults or road worthiness, but does not 
include a person who, 

(i) removes, repairs, and balances 
wheels and tires, 

(ii) changes oil in motorcycles or lubri- 
cates motorcycles, including 
lubricating drive shafts, 

(iii) supplies motorcycles with anti-freez- 
ing solutions, 

(iv) replaces cooling-system hoses, en- 
gine-driven belts, and thermostats, 

(v) cleans or replaces spark plugs, 

(vi) installs new or rental batteries or 
battery cables, or recharges bat- 
teries, and 

(vii) performs any other duties normally 
performed by a service station atten- 
dant. O. Reg. 101/69, s. 1. 



2. The trade of motorcycle mechanic is designated 
as a certified trade for the purposes of the Act. 
O.Reg. 101/69, s. 2. 



3. An apprentice training program for the certi- 
fied trade is established and shall consist of, 



{a) training and instruction at full-time educa- 
tional day classes provided at a College of 
AppUed Arts and Technology or in classes 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto ; and 

(b) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by an employer of the apprentice, 

in the subjects contained in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 101/69, s. 3. 

4. — (1) Subject to subsections 2 and 3, an appren- 
tice shall complete three periods of training and 
instruction of 1800 hours per period. 

(2) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Grade 12 Secondary School Graduation 
Diploma or has Ontario Grade 12 standing in English, 
Mathematics and Science or has such other academic 
qualification that, in the opinion of the Director, is 
equivalent thereto, he shall complete three periods of 
training and instruction of 1600 hours per period. 

(3) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Grade 12 Secondary School Graduation 
Diploma majoring in auto mechanics or has such 
other qualification that, in the opinion of the Direc- 
tor, is equivalent thereto, he shall complete three 
periods of training and instruction of 1200 hours per 
period. 0. Reg. 101/69, s. 4. 

5. Any person who, 

(a) applies in the prescribed form for appren- 
ticeship in the certified trade ; and 

(b) becomes an apprentice in the certified trade 
within three months after commencing to 
work in that trade, 

is exempt from subsection 2 of section 10 of the Act. 
O.Reg. 101/69, s. 5. 

6. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the certi- 
fied trade whether for his regular daily hours or for 
hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall not be 
less than, 

{a) 50 per cent during the first period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 

{b) 70 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; and 

(c) 90 per cent during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction. 



272 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 41 



of the average rate of wages for journeymen em- 
ployed by the employer in that trade or, where the 
employer is the only journeyman employed, of the 
average rate of wages for journeymen in the area. 
O. Reg. 101/69, s. 6. 



7. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
are the subjects contained in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 101/69, s. 7. 



8. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the certified trade shall not 
exceed, 



{a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
certified trade, one apprentice plus an addi- 
tional apprentice for each additional two 
journeymen employed by the employer in 
the certified trade and with whom the 
apprentice is working ; and 

{b) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the certified trade, one apprentice for the 
first journeyman employed by the employer 
plus an additional apprentice for each addi- 
tional two journeymen employed by the 
employer in the certified trade and with 
whom the apprentice is working. O. Reg. 
101/69. s. 8. 



Schedule 

MOTORCYCLE MECHANIC 

Part 1 

In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


' 


Mathematics 


Arithmetic 
Geometry 


Addition, subtraction and division of whole numbers 
and fractions, ratio and proportion, areas and 
volumes. 

Lines, planes and angles. 


2 


Science 


Physics 


Basic laws and principles, formulae. 
(Given as required in shop instruction.) 


3 


English 


Basic Usage and 

Business 

Communications 


Trade terminology and usage. Letter and report 
writing. Work and parts orders. Interpretation 
and use of manufacturers' manuals. 


4 


Drafting 


Basic Drafting and 
Interpretation 


Preparation of elementary working drawings and 
dimensioned sketches of motorcycle components. 
Interpretation of exploded drawings, electrical and 
hydraulic circuits and schematics used in manu- 
facturers' manuals. 


5 


General Shop 
Practice 


Safety 
Hand Tools 


Safety rules and safe operating procedures. First 
aid. Fire prevention. Use and maintenance of 
fire-fighting equipment. 

Handling of gasoline, oils and cleaning solvents. 
Danger of carbon monoxide fumes. Correct use of 
lifting and hoisting equipment. Good housekeeping. 

Selection and use of hammers, punches, chisels, pliers, 
wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers, hacksaws, files. 



Reg. 41 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



273 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 








drifts, scrapers, snips, clamps, drill bits, reamers, 
vises, taps and dies. Stud extractors. Hones. Tool 
crib procedures. 






Power Tools 


Use and care of portable air/electric drills, impact 
tools, grinders, sanders. 






Benchwork 


Cutting with hacksaw, filing, scraping, drilling, 
reaming, rivetting, use of drill press. Use of bench 
grinders. Grinding of drill bits, chisels, etc. Fitting 
bearings, bushings; honing; cutting and flaring 
tubing. Soldering, gasket making. Oxy-acetylene 
and arc welding and cutting. Brazing techniques. 
Care and maintenance of welding equipment. 






Measuring 
Instruments 


Use of rules, straight edges and squares. Feeler 
gauges, calipers, verniers, micrometers, telescopic 
gauges, dial indicators, trammel gauges, pressure 
gauges. 






Fastening Devices 


Purpose and types of bolts, nuts, studs, screws and 
tube fittings. Thread identification and classifica- 
tion. Tensile strengths. Installation procedures. 
Tightening torques. Cutting internal and external 
threads. Removing broken studs. Heli-coil type 
inserts. Purpose and types of rivets, keys, springs, 
flat and lock washers, snap rings, circlips, cotter 
pins. Installation and removal. Thread lubricants, 
sealers and locking compounds. 






General Shop 
Equipment 


Capacities and correct usage of chain-hoists, jacks, 
stands, hydraulic presses, pullers. Power hacksaws. 
Operation and maintenance of degreasing and steam- 
cleaning equipment. Operation and running main- 
tenance of air compressors. 


6 


Air-Cooled 
Engines 


Principles, Types 
and Definitions 


Principles of operation. 2 and 4 stroke cycles. 
Engine types — single and multi-cylinder; side and 
O.H.V. 

Definition of bore, stroke, combustion, piston dis- 
placement, clearance volume, swept volume, com- 
pression ratios and pressures, horsepower, torque. 
Engine formulae. Heat transfer. Combustion 
chamber design and efficiency. 






Engine Components 


Types and function of engine components :cyHnders, 
cylinder heads, pistons and rings, wrist pins, connect- 
ing rods. Crankcases, crankshafts, flywheels, bear- 
ings. Valves and guides, valve trains, camshafts, 
timing gears or chains, gaskets. 






Engine Disassembly 
and Cleaning 


Disassembly procedures and sequence. Removing 
heads and cylinders, disassembly of crankcases and 



274 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 41 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Inspection 



Overhaul and 
Reconditioning 



Valve Train 
Servicing 



Engine Reassembly 



Types and 
Classification of 
Lubricants 



Lubricating Systems 



Carburetion and 
Fuel Systems 



connecting rod/crankshaft assemblies. Cleaning 
procedures for ferrous and non-ferrous metals. 



Inspection procedures, 
tive testing techniques, 
taper, oversize limits. 



Wear limits. Non-destruc- 
Cylinder wear: ovality and 



Procedures and equipment for: cylinder boring, 
honing and deglazing. Piston and ring fitting: 
clearances. Use of honing machine for resizing con- 
necting rod bores for oversize wrist pins and rollers, 
piston pin fitting. Removal and installation of 
interference fit pins and bearings — thermal and 
cold-press methods. Reaming and lapping crank- 
shaft main bearing bushings. 

Procedures and equipment for: Refacing valves and 
seats: lapping and testing contact areas. Refacing 
rocker arms and tappets. Removing, installing and 
resizing valve guides. Testing hydraulic lifters and 
valve springs. 

Assembly sequence and procedures. Fits, clearances 
and tolerances. Torquing. Reassembling and 
aligning crankshaft/connecting rod assemblies. Use 
of dial gauges, aligning fixtures, lathes or "V" blocks 
and surface plates. Valve timing and lash settings. 

Characteristics of lubricants: Detergent, non-deter- 
gent. S.A.E. viscosity ratings, A.P.I, classification. 
Additives. Oil contamination and deterioration. 
Graphites and greases. 

Types of engine lubricating systems: wet sump, dry 
sump, fuel/oil mix, pressure, splash and dip feeds. 
Metering controls. Gear, plunger and vane type 
pumps; screens and filters; full-flo and by-pass 
types. Pressure indication and control. Servicing 
and overhaul procedures. 

Definition of fuel/air ratio, atomization, vapouriza- 
tion, weight of fuel and air, venturi. 
Motorcycle carburetor types and characteristics: 
side and down draft, float and diaphragm types. 
Carburetor circuits and systems. Throttle types: 
disc (butterfly), manual or vacuum controlled vari- 
able venturi slide valves, combination types. Choke 
valves. Fuel pumps, air cleaners, filters and strain- 
ers, fuel valves and lines. Throttle controls and 
cables. Maintenance, cleaning, overhaul or replace- 
ment, and adjusting procedures. Synchronizing 
dual carburetors. Fuel tank repairs: safety pre- 
cautions. 



Reg. 41 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



275 



Item 



Column 1 



Course 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Subject 



[nstruction To Be Given 



Exhaust Systems 



Muffler types and characteristics; acceptable noise 
levels. Causes of excessive back pressure: effect on 
engine operation. Exhaust port carbon build-up 
and removal (2 cycle engines). Exhaust pipe and 
muffler removal and installation. 



7 Electrical 
Systems 



I 



Basic Electricity 



Electrical Circuits 



Switches and 
Instruments 



Batteries 



Coil Ignition 
Systems 



Magneto Ignition 



Spark Plugs 



Definition of amperes, voltage, resistance. Ohm's 
Law. Electron flow. Electro-magnetism. Series 
and parallel circuits. Voltage drop. Conductors 
and insulators. Use of voltmeters, ammeters, and 
ohmmeters. 

Characteristics of typical motorcycle circuits. Volt- 
ages and currents. Ground circuits. Automotive 
type wire and cables. Insulation materials. Joining, 
splicing, soldering and insulating wires and cables. 
Removal and installation of terminals, connectors 
and plugs. Effects of temperature, shorts, grounds, 
poor connections. Resistances, fuses and circuit 
breakers. Identification, tracing and testing of 
circuits. 

Operation and function of switches, relays and in- 
struments. Indicator lights. Rheostats, resistors, 
capacitors and semi-conductors. Test, repair and 
replacement procedure. 

Principles, characteristics and function of lead acid 
batteries. Electro-chemical action. Inspection, 
testing and maintenance. Use of voltmeters, am- 
meters, load resistances and hydrometers. Battery 
charging. Charging and handling hazards. Dry- 
charged batteries activation procedures. 

Characteristics and function of ignition coils. 
Electro-magnetic induction. Polarity, secondary 
voltage range, internal and external resistors. Coil 
testing equipment; output, insulation and polarity 
tests. Function, mounting and driving of dis- 
tributors. Cam lobes, single and double contact 
points, dwell angle, condensers, rotors. Centrifugal 
and manual advance. Secondary voltage distribu- 
tion. Radio suppression. Ignition timing. Inspec- 
tion, testing and overhaul procedures. Synchroniz- 
ing dual points. 

Types, characteristics, construction and principles of 
operation. Primary and secondary circuits. Breaker 
mechanisms. Spark advance methods. Timing 
procedures. Magneto inspection, testing, adjusting 
and overhaul. 

Characteristics and operation. Temperature con- 
trol and heat ranges. Analyzing deposits. Testing, 
cleaning, gapping and instalhng. Torquing. 



276 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 41 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






D.C. Systems 


Types. Generator construction and principles of 
operation. Electro-magnetic induction. Electrical 
and magnetic circuits. Commutation. Regulator 
types, construction features and operation. Voltage 
and current regulation ; cut-out relays. Temperature 
compensation. 






A.C. Systems 


Alternator types, construction and principles of 
operation. Electro-magnetic induction. Electrical 
circuits ("Y" and delta). Magnetic circuits. Rec- 
tification. Current limitation. A.C. regulators and 
relays. Temperature compensation. 






Inspection Testing 
Repair and Overhaul 


Inspection and test procedures for generators, alter- 
nators, regulators, relays, wiring and ground cir- 
cuitry. Disassembly, cleaning, overhauling, adjust- 
ing, testing generators, alternators, regulators, and 
relays. Replacing wiring. Replacing rectifiers. 






Starter Motors and 
Starter Generators 


Types and principles of operation. Electric and 
magnetic circuits. Commutation. Starter motor 
drives. Neutral switches. Inspecting and testing 
starting circuits; motors, drives, switches, cables and 
wiring. Cleaning, repair and overhaul procedures. 






Lights 


Types and characteristics. Bulbs and seal beam 
units. Lenses and holders. Signal lights; flasher 
units. Series and parallel circuits. Ground circuits. 
Aiming, testing, installing and repairing lights. 






Horns 


Characteristics. Horn operation. Electrical cir- 
cuits and relays. Amperage draw. Horn controls. 
Inspecting and adjusting horns. 


8 


Power Trains 


Chain Drives 


Characteristics of typical chain drives for camshafts, 
timing, primary drives and rear drives. Correct use 
of master links and chain tensioners. Lubrication 
requirements and methods. Determination of chain 
and sprocket wear; wear limits. Free-play adjust- 
ment. Rear drive chain alignment procedures. 
Chain and sprocket removal, installation, align- 
ment and adjustment. 






Shaft Drives 


Characteristics of typical shaft drive motorcycles. 
Types of shafts, universal joints, bevel gears, bear- 
ings, seals. Procedures for adjusting bearings and 
gear lash. Overhaul or replacement of shaft drive 
assemblies. 






Clutches 


Types, characteristics and operation: single and 
multiple disc wet and dry types. Clutch compo- 
nents. Controls and cables. Adjustment, overhaul 
and replacement procedures. Characteristics and 
operation of automatic centrifugal clutches and 
variable ratio "V" belt drives. Component parts. 



Reg. 41 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



277 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Transmissions 

Rear Axles 

(3 wheel Vehicles) 

Wheels, Axles, 
Bearings, Tires 


Overhaul and internal adjustment procedures. Belt 
replacement techniques. 

Types and characteristics and operation, 2 to 6 speed. 
Component parts. Gear types: fixed, cluster and 
sliding. Input, output and countershafts. Gear 
shift forks, controls and selector mechanisms. Types 
and characteristics of kick starter and scooter start- 
ing mechanisms. Adjustment, overhaul and replace- 
ment procedures. Lubrication requirements. 

Types and characteristics. Component parts. Dif- 
ferential action. Lubrication requirements. Pro- 
cedures for replacing oil seals, bearings and adjusting 
gear lash. Overhaul and replacement procedures. 

Characteristics and construction features: motor- 
cycle wheels, axles and bearings. Procedures for 
removing and installing wheels. Wheel trueing; 
spoke tightening; ckecking run-out. Bearing lubri- 
cation, replacement, adjustment. Procedures for 
ckecking wheel tracking aHgnment. Tire and tube 
construction and characteristics: inspection tech- 
niques. Tire demounting and mounting. Tube 
repair techniques. Wheel balancing procedures. 
Security bolt use. 


9 


Frames and 

Suspension 

Systems 


Frames, Forks, 
Hydraulics 


Types, characteristics and construction features: 
frames, front fork and head fittings, steering dam- 
pers, front and rear suspension units, rear forks and 
ride controls. Procedures and techniques for ser- 
vicing and overhaul of hydraulic suspension units 
and frame assemblies. Procedures for frame straight- 
ening and alignment : Cold press and heat straighten- 
ing, when and where to use. Safety precautions. 
Priming and paint touch-up technique: use of aerosol 
materials. Procedures and fittings for side-car 
hook-ups: ahgnment techniques. 






10 


Brake Systems 


Mechanical and 
Hydraulic Brakes 


Types and characteristics of mechanical motorcycle 
brakes: single and dual cam, front cable and rear 
pedal controlled. Characteristics of hydraulic brake 
systems. Procedures for adjusting, overhauHng and 
servicing mechanical and hydraulic systems, re- 
placing cables and controls, relining shoes, trueing 
drums, honing wheel and master cylinders. 


11 


Components 


Related Components 
and Accessories 


Types and characteristics: handlebars, fenders, chain 
guards and covers, foot-rests, saddles and seats. 
Adjustment, repair or replacement procedures. 


12 


Motorcycle 
Inspection 


Inspection Techniques 


Use of traffic code, motorcycle operating and riding 

techniques, safety precautions and protective equip- 
ment. Testing and checking procedures. Preparing 
inspection reports: D.O.T. inspection procedures 
and requirements. 



278 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 41 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


13 


Motorcycle Shop 
Management 


Operations 

Costing 

Public Relations 


Business organization: types of ownership. Shop 
equipment. Advertising methods. Salesmanship. 
Business law: financial operations. Government 
regulations applicable to motorcycle repair shops, 
journeymen and apprentices. Parts and supplies 
ordering: trade discounts. QuaHty control: accept- 
able standards, warranties. 

Elementary bookkeeping: average operation times, 
labour, parts and overhe'ad costs. Use of pricing 
lists and manuals. Billing typical repair work. 

Proper conduct and business dealings in relation to 
employer, customers and coworkers. Punctuality. 



Part 2 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


• 


General Shop 
Practice 


General 


Safety rules and removal of all safety hazards. 
Use of hand and power tools, measuring instruments, 
fastening devices and general shop equipment. 
Bench work operations (as detailed in Part 1.) 


2 


Air-Cooled 
Engines 


Engine Operation, 
Testing and 
Adjustment 

Engine Repair and 
Reconditioning 

Lubricants and 
Lubrication Systems 


Familiarization with 2 and 4 stroke engine types, 
components and correct operation. Recognition of 
abnormal engine noises and causes. 
Identification of effects of cylinder wear, defective 
valves, gaskets and incorrect valve timing on engine 
performance. Torquing heads. Adjusting valve 
lash. Compression testing. 

Repair and complete overhauls: including dis- 
assembly, cleaning and inspection, cylinder boring 
and honing, bearing and pin fitting, valve and seat 
refacing. Crankshaft disassembly, reassembly and 
alignment. Valve timing and lash setting. 

Familiarization with lubricant types, classifications, 
ratings and usage. Fuel/oil mix and ratio. Engine 
oil pumps, lines, filters, gauges, pressure and meter- 
ing controls. Adjustments, overhaul and main- 
tenance. 



Reg. 41 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



279 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Carburetion and 
Fuel Systems 

Exhaust Systems 


Carburetors, pumps, air cleaners, filters and lines. 
Maintenance, rebuilding, testing and adjusting. 
Synchronizing dual carbs. Throttle control and 
cable adjustment and replacement. Tank repairs. 

Replacement of exhaust pipes and mufflers. Carbon 
removal (2 cycle). 


3 


Electrical 
Systems 


Ignition Systems 

A.C. and D.C. 
Systems 


Magneto and coil ignition systems. H.T. cables, 
spark plugs. Testing, adjusting and servicing, over- 
haul or replacement. Ignitioii timing. 

Generators, alternators, rectifiers, regulators, starter 
motors, instrument panels, lights, signals, horns, cir- 
cuit breakers and fuses, switches, cables and wiring. 
Testing, adjusting, overhaul or replacement. Char- 
ging and testing batteries. 


4 


Power Trains 


Chain Drives 

Shaft Drives 
Clutches 

Transmissions 

Rear Axles 

(3 Wheel Vehicles) 

Wheels, Bearings, 
Tires 


Camshaft, timing, primary, rear drive chains and 
sprockets: master hnks, chain tensioners. Lubrica- 
tion. Free play and wear limit checks. Adjustment 
alignment, replacement. 

Shafts, universals, bevel gears, bearings. Gear 
lash-settings and adjustments. Overhaul and 
replacement. 

Single and multiple disc wet and dry types. Controls 
and cables. Overhaul, replacement and adjustment. 
Automatic centrifugal clutches and variable ratio 
"V" belt drives. Overhaul and internal adjustments. 
Belt replacement. 

2 to 6 speed types. Gear shift selectors, linkage and 
controls. Kick-starter and scooter starting mech- 
anism. Overhaul, testing and adjustments. 

Rear axles, differentials. Replacing oil seals and 
bearings. Adjusting ring gear and pinion mesh and 
back-lash. Complete overhauls. 

Wheels, axles and bearings: Wheel removal and 
installation: trueing, spoke tightening. Bearing 
lubrication, replacement and adjustment. Wheel 
tracking alignment. Tire inspection, demounting 
and mounting. Tube repairs. Pressure checks. Use 
of security bolts. Wheel balancing. 


5 


Frames and 

Suspension 

Systems 


Frames, Forks, 
Hydraulics 


Frames, front fork and head fittings, steering damp- 
ers, front and rear suspension units, rear forks. Ride 
controls. Servicing and overhaul of hydrauhc sus- 
pension units and frame assembhes. Frame straight- 
ening and alignment : heat straightening precautions. 
Priming and paint touch-up after repairs. Side-car 
hook-ups and alignment. 



280 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 41 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


6 


Brake Systems 


Mechanical and 
Hydraulic Brakes 


Single and dual cam types. Front cable and rear 
pedal controls. Hydraulic brakes. Servicing and 
adjustments. Overhauling brake systems, replacing 
cables and controls, rehning shoes, honing master 
and wheel cylinders. 


7 


Components 


Related Components 
and Accessories 


Handlebars, fenders, chain guards and covers, foot- 
rests, saddles and seats. Adjustment, repair or 
replacement. 


8 


Motorcycle 
Operation 


Road Testing and 
Inspection 


Familiarization with traffic code, operating and 

riding techniques, safety precautions. 
Road testing. Preparing inspection reports: famili- 
arization with D.O.T. inspection procedures and 
requirements. 



O. Reg. 101/69, Sched. 



Reg. 42 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



281 



REGULATION 42 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 
PAINTERS AND DECORATORS 
1. In this Regulation, 



(a) "painter and decorator" means a person 
who, 

(i) does brush, roller and spray paint- 
ing, 

(ii) hangs paper and applies vinyl fabrics, 
grass cloth and similar products, 

(iii) applies plastic wall coverings and 
special finishes to wood and other 
materials, 

(iv) applies preservatives and protective 
coatings, 

(v) does sign writing, or 

(vi) tapes gyproc and wallboard ; 

(6) "trade" means the trade of painter and 
decorator. O. Reg. 228/65, s. 1. 

2. An apprentice training program in the trade is 
established and shall consist of four periods of train- 
ing and instruction of 1800 hours each, 

(a) at full-time educational day classes pro- 
vided at a College of Applied Arts and 
Technology in the courses contained in 
Schedule 1 ; and 

{b) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by an employer of the apprentice in 
the courses contained in Schedule 2. O. Reg. 
228/65, s. 2, revised. 



3. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the trade 
whether for his regular daily hours or hours in excess 
of his regular daily hours shall be not less than, 



(a) 40 per cent during the first period ; 
(6) 50 per cent during the second period ; 
(c) 60 per cent during the third period ; and 
{d) 80 per cent during the fourth period, 



of the rate of wages or its equivalent for a journeyman 
employed by the same employer in the trade and with 
whom the apprentice is working. O. Reg. 228/65, 
s.3. 



4. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the trade shall not exceed. 



[a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
trade, one apprentice plus an additional 
apprentice for every five journeymen em- 
employed by the employer in the trade and 
with whom the apprentice is working; and 



{b) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the trade, one apprentice for the first jour- 
neyman employed by the employer plus 
one additional apprentice for each addi- 
tional five journeymen employed by the 
employer in the trade and with whom the 
apprentice is working. O. Reg. 228/65, 
S.4. 



282 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 42 



Schedule 1 
PAINTERS AND DECORATORS 

In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Colour theory 


Light behaviour, wave length, absorption, reflection, blending 
and colour harmony. 


2 


Drafting 


Print and specification reading. 


3 


Mathematics 


As related to surface measurement and quantities. 


4 


Industrial economics 


As related to preparation, application, repair and maintenance. 


5 


Industrial safety 


As related to the trade requirements. 



O. Reg. 228/65, Sched. 1, 



Schedule 2 

PAINTERS AND DECORATORS 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


Trade Practice 


Shop practice relating to the use of hand, portable and power 
tools, and equipment in common use in the trade. 


2 


Interior and exterior painting 


Surface preparation, application of priming, intermediate and 

finish coats on building and construction materials. 


3 


Interior and exterior wood finish- 
ing 


Surface preparation, application of stain and filler, bleaches, 
shellac, putties, varnish coats and lacquer. 


4 


Wall coverings 


Surface preparation, cutting, pasting and application of 
covering. Application of high-priced hangings. 


5 


Special features 


Graining, blending, mottling, stipphng, glazing, texturing, 
brocade finishing and marbling. 



O. Reg. 228/65, Sched. 2. 



Reg. 43 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



283 



REGULATION 43 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



PLASTERERS 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of 
plasterer ; 

(b) "plasterer" means a person who, 

(i) applies plaster and stucco to the 
walls and ceilings, whether interior 
or exterior, of a structure, 

(ii) applies plaster and stucco on lath, 
masonry and rigid insulation, and 

(iii) tapes gyproc and wallboard. O. Reg. 
469/70, s.l. 

2. The trade of plasterer is designated as a certi- 
fied trade for the purposes of the Act. O. Reg. 
469/70, s. 2. 

3. — (1) No person shall become an apprentice in 
the certified trade unless he has completed Grade 8 
or has such other academic quahfication that, in the 
opinion of the Director, is equivalent thereto. 

(2) Notwithstanding subsection 1, a person who 
has, 

(a) graduated in a course for the trade of 
plasterer offered in the occupational pro- 
gram of a Junior or Special Vocational 
School ; and 

(6) been recommended to the Director by the 
principal of the school where he completed 
the course for enrollment as an apprentice 
in the certified trade, 

may be registered as an apprentice in that trade. 
O. Reg. 469/70, s. 3. 

4. An apprentice training program for the certi- 
fied trade is established and shall consist of, 

{a) training and instruction at full-time educa- 
tional day classes provided at a College of 
Applied Arts and Technology or in courses 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto, in the subjects con- 
tained in Schedule 1 ; and 



{b) practical training and instruction provided 
by the employer of the apprentice in the 
subjects contained in Schedule 2. O. Reg. 
469/70, s. 4. 



5. An apprentice shall complete four periods of 
training and instruction of 1600 hours per period. 
O. Reg. 469/70, s. 5. 



6. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
in the certified trade are the subjects contained in 
schedules 1 and 2. O. Reg. 469/70, s. 6. 



7. Notwithstanding subsection 2 of section 8 of 
Regulation 33 of Revised Regulations of Ontario, 
1970 every hour worked by an apprentice in excess 
of his regular daily hours of practical training and 
instruction shall be included in computing the hours 
spent in training and instruction. O. Reg. 469/70, 
S.7. 



8. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the certified trade shall not 
exceed, 

(a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
trade, one apprentice plus an additional 
apprentice for every five journeymen em- 
ployed by that employer in the trade and 
with whom the apprentice is working; and 

(6) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the trade. One apprentice for the first jour- 
neyman employed by the employer plus an 
additional apprentice for each additional 
five journeymen employed by that em- 
ployer in the trade and with whom the 
apprentice is working. O. Reg. 469/70, s. 8. 



9. Sections 8 and 9 and subsections 2, 3 and 4 of 
section 10 of the Act do not apply to any person who 
works or is employed in the certified trade. O. Reg. 
469/70. s. 9. 

10. A certificate of quahfication in the certified 
trade is not required to be renewed. O. Reg. 469/70, 
s. 10. 



284 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 43 



Schedule 1 
PLASTERER 

In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Academic 
Subjects 


General 

Trade 
Terminology 


Blueprint reading, arithmetic, geometry, English, 
inter-relationships with supervisors and fellow 
workers. 

Vocabulary of plastering terms and inter-relationship 
with other building trades. 


2 


General 

Trade 

Practice 


Safety 

Tools 
Bases 
Base Coats 

Aggregates 

Smooth Finishes 
Irregular Finishes 


Safety practices in the erection and use of scaffolds, 
ladders, hoisting and other such equipment . The Con- 
struction Safety Act. 

Housekeeping : protection of finished work, removal of 
waste materials, clean up of job site. 

Identification, care and use of hand and power tools 
and equipment as related, to the trade and safety 
practices pertaining to same. 

Types and uses : Masonry such as brick, clay and tile, 
gypsum block, cement block, metal lath, gypsum 
board, insulating fiber boards, insulating polystyrene. 

Neat hardwall, fibered and unfibered. Light weight 
base coats as perlite and vermiculite. Portland 
cement plaster ; waterproofing. Concrete, bond stone 
and plaster weld. 

Identification, selection and use of sand, perlite and 
vermiculite. 

Lime, keenes, non-alkaline. 

Sponge, dash, float, stipple, acoustic, spray, stucco. 


3 


Molds 


Types and Uses 


Fabrication, run in place, run on bench. 


4 


Mitering 


Mitering Techniques 


Use of joint rod, cut and planted returns. 


5 


Layout 


Identification 
and Planning 


General geometric layout for all plastering conditions 
in shop and site. 


6 


Quantity 
Take-off 


Calculations 


Method of calculating areas and volumes and deter- 
mining the related requirements of plastering 
materials. 



O. Reg. 469/70, Sched. 



Reg. 43 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



285 



Schedule 2 

PLASTERER 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 




General Trade 
Practice 


Safety 

Tools 
Bases 

Materials 
Application 


Safety practices in the erection and use of scaffolds, 
ladders, hoisting and other such equipment. The Con- 
struction Safety Act. 

Housekeeping: Protection of finished work, removal 
of waste materials, clean up of job site. 

Trade Terminology: Vocabulary of plastering terms 
and inter-relationship with other building trades. 

Identification, care and use of hand and power tools 
and equipment as related to the trade and safety 
practices pertaining to same. 

Types and uses: Masonry such as brick, clay and tile. 
Gypsum block, cement block. Metal lath. Gypsum 
board. Insulating fiber boards. Insulating poly- 
styrene. 

Identification and use of plastering materials for both 
base and finishing coats. 

Techniques of application, by hand and by machine. 


2 


Molds 


Construction 
and Use 


Fabrication, run in place, run on bench. 


3 


Mitering 


Application 


Use of joint rods, cut and planted returns. 


4 


Layout 


Practical Planning 


General geometric layout for all plastering conditions 
in shop and site. 


5 


Quantity 
Take-off 


Practical 
Calculations 


Calculating areas and volumes and determining the 
related requirements of plastering materials. 


6 


Leadership 


Indoctrination 


Functions of a superintendent. Reading and interpre- 
tation of specifications. Room scheduhng. 



O. Reg. 469/70, Sched. 2. 



286 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 44 



REGULATION 44 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



PLUMBERS 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of 
plumber ; 

(b) "plumber" means a person who, 

(i) lays out, assembles, installs, main- 
tains or repairs in any structure, 
building or site, piping, fixtures and 
appurtenances for the supply of 
water for any domestic or industrial 
purpose or for the disposal of water 
that has been used for any domestic 
or industrial purpose, 

(ii) connects to piping any appliance 
that uses water supplied to it or 
disposes of waste, 

(iii) installs the piping for any process, 
including the conveyance of gas, or 
any tubing for a pneumatic or air- 
handhng system, 

(iv) makes joints in piping, or 

(v) reads and understands design draw- 
ings, manufacturers' literature and 
installation diagrams for piping and 
appliances connected thereto, 

but does not include a person engaged in, 

(vi) the manufacture of equipment or the 
assembly of a unit prior to delivery 
to a building, structure or site, 

(vii) the laying of metallic or non-metallic 
pipe into trenches to form sanitary 
or storm sewers, drains or water 
mains, or 

(viii) the repair and maintenance of the 
installations in an operating indus- 
trial plant. O. Reg. 227/65. s. 1; 
O.Reg. 224/66. s.l. 

2. The trade of plumber is designated as a certi- 
fied trade for the purposes of the Act. O. Reg. 
227/65, s. 2. 

3. — (1) An apprentice training program is estab- 
lished for the ( ertified trade and shall consist of five 
periods of training and instruction of 1 800 hours each, 



(a) at full-time educational day classes pro- 
vided at a College of AppUed Arts and 
Technology in the courses contained in 
Schedule 1 ; and 

{b) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by an employer of the apprentice in 
the courses contained in Schedule 2. 

(2) An apprentice in the certified trade who holds 
a Secondary School Graduation Diploma is entitled 
to, 

(a) a credit of 450 hours in respect of the first 
period of training and instruction ; and 

(b) a further credit of 450 hours at the end of 
each of the first, second and third periods 
of training and instruction if he obtains at 
least 75 per cent of an examination pres- 
scribed by the Director. O. Reg. 227/65, 
s. 3, revised. 

4. Any person who. 

{a) applies in the prescribed form for appren- 
ticeship in the certified trade ; and 

(6) becomes an apprentice within three months 
after commencing to work in that trade, 

is exempt from subsection 2 of section 10 of the Act. 
O. Reg. 227/65, s. 4. 

5. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the cer- 
tified trade whether for his regular daily hours or for 
hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall not be 
less than, 

(a) 40 per cent during the first period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 

(6) 50 per cent during the second period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 

(c) 60 per cent during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 

(d) 70 per cent during the fourth period of 
training and instruction ; and 

{e) 80 per cent during the fifth period of train- 
ing and instruction, 

of the hourly rate of wages or its equivalent for a 
journeyman employed by the same employer in the 
certified trade and with whom the apprentice is 
working. O. Reg. 227/65. s. 5. 



Reg. 44 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



287 



6. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the certified trade shall not 
exceed, 

(a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
trade, one apprentice plus an additional 
apprentice for every three journeymen em- 
ployed by the employer in the trade and 
with whom the apprentice is working ; and 

(6) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the trade, one apprentice for the first jour- 



neyman employed by the employer plus an 
additional apprentice for each additional 
three journeymen employed by the em- 
ployer in the trade and with whom the 
apprentice is working. O. Reg. 227/65, 
s.6;0. Reg. 224/66, s. 2. 



7. A certificate of qualification expires with the 
28th day of February in each year. O. Reg. 227/65, 
S.7. 



Schedule 1 

PLUMBERS 
In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject Matter 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Metallurgy 


Ferrous and non-ferrous metal and alloys. Uses and character- 
istics. 


2 


Building Construction 


Codes, materials, hangers, supports and fixings. 


3 


Science 


Fluids and gases, pressure, strength of materials, plastics, 
corrosion, electricity, bacteriology. 


4 


Drafting 


Print and specification reading. 


5 


Mathematics 


Measurement, quantities, capacities, rate of flow and such 
mathematics as are related to science. 


6 


Industrial Economics 


As related to installation, repair and maintenance. 


7 


Welding and Heating Equipment 


Gas welding as related to metal bending, joining and repair. 
Safety. 


8 


Sanitary Engineering 


Waste products and their disposal. 



O. Reg. 227/65, Sched. 1. 



288 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 44 



Schedule 2 

PLUMBERS 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject Matter 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


Shop Technique 


Shop practice relating to the use of hand tools, portable tools 
and power tools and equipment. 


2 


Materials 


Metal, plastic, concrete and ceramic. 


3 


Pipe and Duct Preparation 


Cut, bend, thread, ream, flare and mould as related to the 
material. 


4 


Pumps 


Pressure and vacuum. 


5 


Controls and Valves 


Safety, manual, semi-automatic and automatic. 


6 


Drainage and Sanitation 


Air and vacuum vents and stacks, health, chemical and petro- 
leum wastes. 


7 


Assembly 


Align and join complete or sub-units. 


8 


Installation 


Support and secure complete or sub-units in the shop or in the 
field. 



O. Reg. 227/65, Sched. 2. 



Reg. 45 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



289 



REGULATION 45 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



RADIO AND TELEVISION SERVICE 
TECHNICANS 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of radio 
and television service technician ; 

(b) "radio and television service technician" 
means a person who, 

(i) installs, adjusts and repairs radio 
and television receivers and other 
domestic electronic equipment, 

(ii) makes adjustments to obtain desired 
density, linearity, focus, colour and 
size of television pictures, 

(iii) isolates and detects defects by the 
use of schematic diagrams, volt- 
meters, generators, oscilloscopes and 
other electronic testing instruments, 

(iv) tests and changes tubes and other 
components, 

(v) repairs loose connections and repair? 
or replaces defectiv^e parts by the use 
of hand tools and soldering irons, 
and understands electronic theory 
and shop techniques, 

but does not include a person who is, 

(vi) engaged in the manufacture of radio, 
television, amplifier or other related 
electronic equipment, 

(vii) employed in the repair and main- 
tenance of radio, television, ampli- 
fier or other related electronic equip- 
ment in an industrial plant, or 

(viii) engaged in the wiring of radio, tele- 
vision, amplifier or other related 
electronic equipment to an external 
power source. O. Reg. 129/70, s. 1, 
amended. 



2. The trade of radio and television service tech 
nician is designated as a certified trade for the pur- 
poses of the Act. O. Reg. 129/70, s. 2. 

3, An apprentice training program for the certi- 
fied trade is estabhshed and shall consist of, 



(a) training and instruction at full-time educa- 
tional day classes provided by a College of 
Applied Arts and Technology in the sub- 
jects contained in Schedule 1 or in courses 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto ; and 

(b) practical training and instruction provided 
by an employer of the apprentice in the 
subjects contained in Schedule 2. O. Reg. 
129/70, s. 3. 

4. — (1) Subject to subsection 2, an apprentice 
shall complete four periods of training and instruc- 
tion of 2,000 hours per period. 

(2) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma or 
has at least pass standing in Ontario Grade 12 
English, Mathematics and Science or has such other 
academic qualification that, in the opinion of the 
Director, is equivalent thereto, he shall complete 
four periods of training and instruction of 1,800 hours 
per period. O. Reg. 129/70, s. 4. 

5. The hourly rate of wages for an apprentice in 
the certified trade whether for his regular daily hours 
or for hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall 
not be less than, 

(a) 40 per cent during the first period of training 
and instruction ; 

{b) 50 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; 

(c) 60 per cent during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction ; and 

(d) 80 per cent during the fourth period of 
training and instruction, 



of the average hourly rate of wages for journeymen 
employed by the employer in that trade or, where the 
employer is the only journeyman employed, of the 
average hourly rate of wages for journeymen in the 
area. O. Reg. 129/70, s. 5. 



6. The subjects of examination for a certificate of 
quaUfication are the subjects contained in schedules 1 
and 2. O. Reg. 129/70. s. 6. 

7. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the certified trade shall not 
exceed, 



290 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 45 



{a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
certified trade, one apprentice plus an addi- 
tional apprentice for every two journeymen 
employed by the employer in the certified 
trade and with whom the apprentice is 
working ; and 

(6) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the certified trade, one apprentice for the 
first journeyman employed by the employer 
plus an additional apprentice for every 



additional two journeymen employed by 
the employer in the certified trade and 
with whom the apprentice is working. 
O. Reg. 129/70, s. 7. 

8. Sections 8 and 9 and subsections 2, 3 and 4 
of section 10 of the Act do not apply to any person 
who works or is employed in the certified trade. 
O. Reg. 129/70, s. 8. 

9. A certificate of qualification in the certified 
trade is not required to be renewed. O. Reg. 129/70, 
S.9. 



Schedule 1 

RADIO AND TELEVISION SERVICE TECHNICIAN 
In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Mathematics 
(Trade Related) 


Mathematics 


Fractions, decimals^ square root. Graphs, co-ordin- 
ates. Powers, indices. Equations: types, applications. 
Trigonometry; right angles and vector relationships. 
Slide rule types and usage. Decibel calculations. 


2 


Science 


Physics 


Electricity; static and dynamic. Electron Theory; 
electromotive force, ionization. Electricity in 
motion. Ohm's Law. Electro-chemical energy. 
Conductors, semi-conductors and insulators. Elec- 
trical measurement units. Light; principles, wave 
motion. Sound; units of measurement. Magnetism; 
principles and application. Electro-magnetic in- 
duction. Hysteresis electromagnets. 


3 


English 


Usage and Business 
Communication 


Trade terminology and usage. Sentence and 
paragraph structure. Letter and report writing. 
Work and parts orders. Interpretation and use of 
manufacturers' manuals, exploded drawings and 
parts lists. 


4 


Electronic 
Drafting 


Interpretation 


International and Mil-Spec, symbols; circuits, cable- 
forms, wire harnesses, fastening and locking devices. 
Chassis and panel layout. Printed circuits; materials 
and finishes. Schematics and Circuit tracing, colour 
codes. 


5 


General Shop 
Practice 


Safety 


Safety rules and safe operating procedures. First 
Aid. Fire prevention; use and maintenance of fire- 
fighting equipment. High voltage hazards; bleed- 
ing-off procedures, use of non-conductive matting, 
isolation transformers. X-ray emission. Picture tube 
handling; implosion hazards. Cleaning solvent use; 
toxic fume hazard. Correct lifting methods. Good 
housekeeping. 



Reg. 45 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



291 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Item 








Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Hand Tools 


Care and use of: screwdrivers, pliers, sockets, files. 
Electric soldering irons and guns. Wire forming and 
connections, soldering and desoldering components. 
Use of heat sinks, resin cored solders. Insulating. 






Power Tools 


Care and use of — Portable electric drills, bench 
grinders. Drilling. Grinding screwdrivers and drill 
bits. 






Test Equipment 


Types, care and use of: voltmeters, ammeters, ohm- 
meters, bridges, field strength meters, volume unit- 
meters, distortion meters. Signal generators; cali- 
bration requirements. Oscilloscopes; operation, 
uses and servicing. 


6 


Basic Electricity 


Direct Current 


Series circuits; total resistance, current flow, voltage 
drops. Parallel circuits; total resistance branch 
currents, total current. Series-parallel circuits; 
total resistance simphfication of series-parallel com- 
binations, voltage drops, current. Short circuits 
or open circuits ; effects on total resistance, currents, 
voltage drops, fuses, locating defects. Multiple and 
submultiple of electrical units; conversion. Miscel- 
laneous components ; switches, pilot lamps, hardware. 






Resistors 


Types and construction ; NTC, PTC, and VDR. Power 
and energy in resistors; total in circuit, internal 
resistance of voltage sources. Voltage divider net- 
works; Kirchhoff's Laws, design of dividers. 






DC Measuring 
Instruments 


Moving coil meter; characteristics, sensitivity, am- 
meter shunts, voltmeters and multipliers, ohm- 
meters, meggers. 






DC Motors 


Characteristics; armature, field magnets, commuta- 
tor, brushes. DC generators. 






Alternating Current 


AC principles; induced voltage and current, motor 

action, generation of AC Sine waves. AC Voltage 
oscilloscope patterns; amplitude, frequency, period, 
wavelength, RMS, average and peak to peak values. 
Non-sinusoidal waves. 






Inductance 


Definitions; Lenz's Law, series and parallel induc- 
tance, coefficient of coupHng, mutual inductance. 






Inductive 
Reactance 


Phase angles, series LR Circuits, Parallel circuits, 
vector analysis, impedance, formulae, LR time 
constant. 






Transformers 


Ratios, efficiency, Z matching, isolation, cores, wire, 
windings. 



292 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 45 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Capacitance 
Electro-Statics 

Capacitive 
Reactance 

Resonance 

Filters. 
AC Power 


Capacitor types, characteristics and construction; 
voltage ratings, colour codes, series and parallel 
capacitors, AC voltage dividers. Capacitor testing 
procedures. 

Phase angles, series CR Circuits, parallel CR circuits, 
vector analysis, impedance, formulae, CR time 
constant. 

Series LCR circuits, cancellation of reactances, voltage 
magnification, parallel LCR Circuits; cancellation of 
currents, impedance magnification, formula for 
resonance, RF tuning, Q Band width, response curves, 
harmonics. 

Low pass. High pass. Bandpass, Bandstop, magnetic 
shielding, RF component losses. 

Real power, apparent power, power factor. 


7 


Basic Electronics 


Vacuum Tube 
Fundamentals 

Vacuum Tube 
Amplification and 
Amplifiers 

Power Supplies 


Vacuum tube structure. Tube numbering. Basing, 
ratings. Types of emission, space charge. Diodes; 
rectification and detection. Triode characteristics. 
Plate resistance. Transconductance. AmpHfication 
factor. Triode amplifier, stage gain. DC and AC 
ampHfiers. Interelectrode capacitance. Characteris- 
tics of Tetrode, Beam Power tube and Pentode. 
Power Pentode. Variable-mu Pentode. Multi-unit 
tubes; Compactrons. Tube defects and testing 
procedures. Use of Tube Manuals. 

Audio amplification. CoupUng methods. Classes of 
operation. Bias methods. Load lines. Voltage and 
Power amphfication. Phase relationships. Single- 
ended and push-pull amplifier circuits. Phase in- 
verters. Distortion types and causes. Frequency 
reponse; methods of improving high and low fre- 
quency response in voltage amphfiers. Feedback 
networks. Undistorted power output; power sensi- 
tivity, decibels. Cathode follower. Resistance and 
voltage analysis of audio amplifiers. 

Vacuum tube power supplies. Power supply require- 
ments. Transformer type half-wave and full-wave. 
Transformer-less half-wave. Voltage doublers. Bridge 
rectifiers. Filter circuits and decouphng networks. 
Selenium and Silicon Rectifiers. Transients and PIV. 
Bleeders, Voltage Dividers. Gastype voltage regula- 
tors. Circuit breakers. Power supply servicing pro- 
cedures. 



Reg. 45 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



293 



Item 



Column 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Vacuum Tube 
Oscillators 



Oscillation requirements. Regenerative Feedback 
Principle of Operation. Sine- wave types; Armstrong, 
Hartley, Colpitts, RC phase shift, crystal controlled, 
electron-coupled, tuned-plate-tuned-grid. Non-sine- 
wave types; plate-coupled multi-vibrator, cathode- 
coupled multi- vibrator, blocking oscillator. Operation 
and frequency checking procedures. Servicing tests. 



Semi-conductors 



Atomic Structure 



PN Diodes 



Junction Transistors 



Field Effect 
Transistors 



Transistor Amplifiers 



Coupling Methods 



Power Amplifiers 



Power Supply 
Transistor Oscillators 



Specialized 
Semi-conductors 



Valence. P-type, N-type. Holes. Diffusion and drift. 
Silicon and Germainium types. 

Diode junction. Potential hill or barrier. Majority 
and minority charge carriers. Junction biasing. 
Leakage current. Front-to-back resistance ratio. 
Characteristic diode curve. Avalanche or Zener 
breakdown. Zener diodes; theory and practical 
applications. Diode capacitance; applications and 
disadvantages. Tunnel diodes. 

PNP and NPN types; construction, transistor action. 
Majority and minority carriers. Transistor bases 
and basing diagrams. Tube and transistor com- 
parison. Current gain. Alpha, Beta. Alpha and 
Beta cut-off frequency. 

Channel source, gate, drain. Input impedance. 
Direction of current flow. Pinch effect. Frequency 
response. IGFET (MOSFET). Special handling 
precautions. 

Configurations; common emitter, common base, 
common collector. AmpHfier operation and charac- 
teristics. Transistor biasing methods and stabiliza- 
tion. Transistor characteristic cuves. Plotting load 
lines to predict amplifier performance. 

Cascade amplifiers. Impedance matching consider- 
ations. Transformer-coupling. RC coupling. Impe- 
dance-coupling. Direct-coupling. Volume control 
considerations. Decoupling circuits — RC filters. 
Frequency response of amplifiers. 

Single-ended and push-pull audio output stages. 
Complementary symmetry. Drivers and phase 
inverters. Class A, AB and B operation. Negative 
feedback. Transformerless output circuits. 

Comparison of vacuum tube and transistorized 
types. Zener diodes. 

Feedback and impedance matching considerations. 
Types of oscillators. 

Unijunction transistor. Silicon controlled rectifier. 
Surge and transient suppressors. Switching transis- 
tor circuits. 



294 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 45 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Semi-conductor Data 



Integrated Circuits 



Interpretation of manufacturers' specification sheets 
and tabulated data. Rating of typical low-signal 
and power transistors. Derating at high temper- 
atures. Clarification of parameters. Transistor defects 
and testing. 

Construction. IC amplifiers. External connections. 
Testing procedures. 



Radio 

High-fidelity and 
SoundSystems 



AM Radio 
Transmission and 
Reception Principles 



Heterodyning 



Frequency Converters 



Intermediate 
Frequency 



Detectors 



Automatic Volume 
Control 

Audio Frequency 
Stages 

Practical Tube 
Receiver Circuits 

Practical Transistor 
Receiver Circuits 



Closed oscillatory circuit. Open oscillatory circuit. 
Simple antennas, radio waves. RF carriers. Ampli- 
tude modulation. Simple transmitters. Simple 
receivers. Demodulation. Crystal receiver. Re- 
generative receiver. TRF receiver. Sensitivity and 
selectivity. 

Disadvantage of TRF receivers. Non-linear char- 
acteristics of the amplifier. Frequency conversion, 
intermediate frequency. 

Simple converter stage, using separate local oscillator. 
Pentagrid converters. Conversion Transconductance. 
Harmonic mixers. Superheterodyne receiver block 
diagram. 

IF stages, bandpass filter, double-tuned IF stages. 
Selectivity, gain vs. bandwidth, loose coupling, over 
coupling. Frequency response curves, AM sideband 
theory. Disadvantages of superheterodyne; spurious 
responses. Choice of IF frequencies. Pentode IF 
amp. stage, application of AVC remote cut-off 
Pentode. IF transformer types, construction and 
shielding. 

Operation and characteristics of the tube diode. 
Triode detector; plate, grid leak, regenerative types. 
Crystal detector characteristics. Detector load and 
output polarity. Detector servicing techniques. 

Simple, delayed and filtering types. Application to 
tubes. AVC circuit, DAVC tuning indicators. 



Volume control, tone control 
Power output stage. Speakers. 



AC radios. 
Short Wave. 



AF driver stage. 
AC-battery portables. Automobile. 



RF and IF coupling methods. RF amplifier circuits. 
Converter circuits; separate oscillator and mixer, 
autodyne converter. IF ampHfiers and AGC. AGC 
modes. Detectors. Refiex amplifiers, audio circuitry. 
Schematics of complete receivers. Transistor radio 
troubleshooting procedures; test instruments, tech- 



Reg. 45 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



295 



Column 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Alignment of Tube 
and Transistor 
Receivers 



Propagation 



FM Transmission and 
Reception Principles 



Antennas 



Transmission Lines 



FM Receivers 



High Fidelity Sound 
Systems and Record 
Changers 



Public Address Sound 
Systems 

Tape Recorders 



Trouble Shooting 



niques, precautions. AM/FM receivers. Automobile 
receivers. Techniques for replacing components and 
repairing printed circuit boards. 

Purpose of IF alignment; "Miller" effect. Alignment 
procedures ; equipment used and connection methods. 
Tracking, trimming, padding, rocking the gang 
capacitor. Mixer and RF stage alignment; permea- 
bihty tuned receivers. Alignment techniques. 
Sweep alignment of broad band stages. 

Radio wave, wave energy, wave polarization. Modes 
of propagation; ionosphere, ground wave, sky wave. 

Modulation in general. FM modulation by capaci- 
tive microphone. Side bands in FM modulation 
index. Deviation ratio. Center Frequency, fre- 
quency deviation. Frequency swing, percentage 
modulation. Effect of loudness, effect of AF fre- 
quency. Reactance tube modulator. Frequency 
multipliers. 

Long wire or Marconi antenna, resonant or Hertzian 
type. Halfrwave dipole antenna, standing waves, 
loop, node. Electrical length, directivity, gain, 
front-to-back ratio. Folded dipole antenna, director, 
reflector types. 

Characteristic impedances; open wire, 300 OHM 
lead, coaxial cable, line termination. Source, load, 
impedance matching, energy transfer. Standing wave 
ratio, reflections. Propagation velocity factor. 
Attenuation, losses. Matching stubs. BALUN. 

FM Detectors. Slope detection. Discriminator. 
Ratio detector. Gated beam detectors. AM limiting. 
Pre-emphasis ; de-emphasis. Front ends and inter- 
mediate frequency. FM stereo principles and AFC. 

Aural response ; high-fidelity system requirements. 
Transducers, microphones, speakers, pick-up car- 
tridges, changer mechanisms. Loudness, bass, 
treble, stereophonic effect, speaker enclosures. High- 
fidelity amplifier circuitry. 



Intercoms, 25 and 70 volt lines, 
power. P. A. speakers. 



Acoustics and audio 



Drive mechanisms. Magnetic tape and tape heads; 
reel-to-reel, cassette and cartridge types. Bias 
oscillators. Switching; schematic interpretation. 

Procedures, techniques and test equipment for radio, 
high-fidelity and sound systems. 



296 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 45 



Item 



Column 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



10 



Black and White 
Television 



The Television System 



Camera Tubes 



Scanning and 
Synchronizing 



Composite Video 
Signal 



Picture Carrier Signal 



Television Receivers 



Antennas and 
Transmission Lines 



Power Supplies 



The RF Tuner 



Picture IF Amplifier 



Picture elements. Transmitting and receiving the 
picture. Scanning. Motion pictures. Frame and 
field frequencies. Vertical and horizontal scanning 
frequencies. Synchronization. Picture quahties. 
Television channels. The Associated FM Sound 
Signal. Standards of transmission. Television channel 
frequencies. DOT frequency allocations. Principal 
world television systems. Television broadcasting 
development. 

Photoemission principles. Flying spot camera. Camera 
tube types. Image orthicon. Vidicon. Plumbicon. 
Closed-circuit television. 

Sawtooth waveform for linear scanning. Standard 
scanning pattern. Flicker. Raster distortions. Syn- 
chronizing pulses. 

Construction. Picture information and video signal. 
Video frequencies and picture information. Max- 
imum number of picture elements. Test patterns. 
DC components of the video signal. 

Negative transmission. Vestigial-side-band trans- 
mission. The television channel. Line-of-sight trans- 
mission (UHF and VHF). Television broadcasting. 

Receiver circuits. Sound take-off circuits. Receiver 
circuits and functions; operating controls. Vacuum 
tubes. Semi-conductors. Printed circuits. Block 
diagram. Localizing troubles to a receiver section. 
Multiple troubles. 

Resonant length of antenna. Definition of antenna 
terminology. Ghosts. Straight, folded and broad- 
band dipoles. Long-wire antennas, parasitic arrays. 
Multiband antennas. Rotators. Closed circuit wiring. 
Multi-set coupling. UHF/VHF coupling. 

Full-wave rectifiers. DC voltage polarities. Heater 
circuits. Voltage doublers. Transformerless low- 
voltage power supply. Stacked B -|- circuits. Rectifier 
ratings. High voltage power supplies and safety 
precautions. High voltage troubles. Low voltage 
supply troubles. Hum. 

Operation. The RF amplifier stage and circuits. 
Mixer stage. Local oscillator. AFT vari-cap diode. 
RF alignment. Conversion methods for UHF 
channels. RF tuner circuit types. UHF tuner circuit. 
Vari-cap tuners. Receiver noise. Cleaning. 

Picture IF response. IF amplification. Double and 
single-tuned IF amplifiers. Stagger-tuned stages. 
Wave traps. Picture IF alignment. Picture IF 
amplifier circuits ; related malfunctions. 



Reg. 45 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



297 



Column 1 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Video Detector 



Video Amplification 



PictureTubes 
Brightness Control and 
DC Restoration 



Automatic Gain 
Control 



Sync. Separation 



Deflection Oscillators 



Horizontal AFC 
Circuits 



Vertical Deflection 
Circuits 



Detection. Detector polarity. Video detector load 
resistance and filter. Detector diodes. Peaking 
circuits. Composite video signal functions. Detect- 
ing the 4.5 Mc intercarrier beat. Detector output 
voltage measurement. 

Video signal and picture reproduction. Video signal 
polarity and amplification. Manual contrast con- 
trol. Video frequencies; frequency and phase dis- 
tortion. Video amplifier frequency response. Video 
amplifier circuit. Video signal hum. 

Deflection, focusing and centering. The luminescent 
screen. Picture tube types. The electron beam ; 
focusing technique. Electro-static and magnetic de- 
flection. Picture tube precautions and troubles. 
Brightness control. Video signal DC component 
and average value. DC insertion. Grid-leak bias 
clamping action. Diode clamping circuit. 

AGC circuit requirements and bias controls gain. 
AGC circuits for picture signal ; advantages. Keyed 
AGC circuit. AGC level adjustment and troubles. 
AGC bias for transistor amplifiers. 

Picture vertical and horizontal synchronization. 
Separation of sync, from video signal. Vertical sync, 
integration. Sync, noise. Sync, separator circuits. 
Sync, and blanking bars on kinescope screen. Sync, 
troubles. 

Sawtooth deflection wave form. Producing sawtooth 
voltage. Blocking oscillator and discharge tube. 
Blocking oscillator circuit analysis. Deflection genera- 
tors with blocking oscillator and discharge tube. 
Deflection oscillator control. Blocking oscillator 
synchronization. Multivibrators: plate-coupled and 
cathode-coupled types, sawtooth generator, synchro- 
nization. Trapezoidal voltage waveshape. Incorrect 
oscillator frequency. 

AFC requirements. Push-pull Sync, discriminator. 
Multivibrator circuit controlled by sync, discrimina- 
tor. Single-ended sync, discriminator. DC-control 
tube (synchro-guide). Sine-wave oscillator with 
reactance tube (synchro-lock). Hold-in and pull-in 
ranges. Filtering the DC control voltage. Phasing 
between horizontal blanking and flyback. Anti-hunt 
network. 

Triode vertical output stage, transformers and 
vertical linearity. Internal vertical blanking. 
Vertical deflection circuit with blocking oscillator. 
Combined vertical oscillator and output circuit. 
Vertical deflection troubles. 



298 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 45 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Horizontal Deflection 
Circuits 

FM Sound Signal 

Remote Control 
Systems 

Receiver Servicing 


Circuit function. Horizontal amplifier circuit. 
Horizontal output . circuit damping. Horizontal 
scanning and dampings. Boosted B+ voltage and 
high voltage. Horizontal deflection controls and 
yokes. Horizontal output transformers. Horizontal 
output circuit analysis. Typical horizontal deflection 
circuit and troubles. VDR. 

FM signal frequency changes and audio modulation. 
FM terminology. Reactance tube modulator. FM 
advantages and disadvantages. Pre-emphasis and 
de-emphasis. FM signal receiver requirements and 
slope detection. Triple-tuned and center-tuned 
discriminators. Limiter. Ratio detector. Quadra- 
ture-grid FM detector. Complete sound IF circuit 
and alignment. Intercarrier sound and buzz. 

Types, operation and adjustments. 

Adjustments and cleaning procedures. Types of 
ghosts. RF interference. Picture external noise 
interference and sound; locaUzing hum troubles. 
Testing scanning linearity with bar patterns. Signal 
injection. Localizing receiver troubles and inter- 
mittent faults. DC voltage and oscilloscope measure- 
ments. Alignment procedures. 


11 


Colour Television 


Colorimetry 
Colour Transmission 

Antenna Systems 
Colour Picture Tubes 


Colour, visible spectrum, wave length. Separation 
of colours by prism; white Hght. Primary colours, 
complementary colours. Separation of colours by 
reflection and by projection method. Additive an4 
subtractive filters. Combining colours, recombination 
by additive method. Luminance, chrominance, hue 
and saturation. Deficiencies of human colour vision. 

Compatibility. Characteristics of the N.T.S.C. 
(National Television System Committee) signal. 
Transmitter and receiver block diagrams. Matrixing. 
Y, I and Q signals. Delay hues. Multiplexing — 
balanced modulator. Colour sub-carrier and side- 
bands. Colour burst synchronization. Video 
frequency interleaving. Cancellation interlace. 
Phase relations in colour transmission. Vectors and 
vector diagrams. 

Antenna band width, gain, linearity, response and 
impedance match of system. 

Tri-Gun and In-Line types. Gun assembly 
construction. Phosphor dot face plate. Shadow 
mask. Beam positioning magnets. Purity coil or 
magnet. Lateral blue magnet. Deflection yoke. 
Convergence coils. Degaussing. 



Reg. 45 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



299 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






(Adjustments) 

Y Channel Circuitry 

Colour Processing 
Stages 

Retrace Blanking 

Horizontal Output 
and High Voltage 
System 

Colour Receiver 
Servicing 


Purity. Static and dynamic convergence. Gray 
scale tracking. 

Delay line. Separate sound and video detectors. 
Sound traps. 

Bandpass amplifier circuit. ACC circuits. Colour 
killer, burst keyer and burst amplifier circuits. 
Horizontal blanking amplifier stage. Sub-carrier 
local oscillator and AFPC circuits. Reactance tube 
stage. Colour demodulators; axis of demodulation. 
Colour difference ampUfiers. 

Vertical and horizontal circuits. 

High voltage. High voltage regulation and horizontal 
output adjustment. Boosted B +-1- . Focus. Hori- 
zontal efficiency coil. High voltage. 

Trouble-shooting procedures and techniques and 
test equipment. N.T.S.C. and keyed rainbow colour 
bar generators. Operation, calibration, use of the 
bar-dot generator. Adjustment procedures for sweep 
regulation systems. X-Ray emission problems. 
Demodulator, chroma, chroma sync, and VIF 
alignment techniques. Diagnosing and correcting 
faults in the cathode ray tube, convergence and 
colour circuitry. 


12 


Shop 
Management 


Costing 

PubHc Relations 


Elementary bookkeeping: average operation times, 
labour, parts and overhead costs. Use of pricing lists 
and manuals. Billing typical repair work. 

Proper conduct and business deahngs in relation to 
employer, customers and coworkers. PunctuaHty. 



O. Reg. 129/70, Sched. 



300 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 45 



Schedule 2 

RADIO AND TELEVISION SERVICE TECHNICIAN 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


General Shop 
Practice 


General 


Safety rules and removal of all safety hazards. Care 
and use of trade related hand and power tools and 
test equipment (as detailed in Schedule 1). 


2 


Basic Electricity 


Fundamentals 


Familiarization with series circuits, parallel circuits 
and series — parallel circuits. Kirchhoff's Laws. 
AC and DC characteristics. Inductance, capacitance, 
resistance. Transformers — fundamentals. Com- 
ponents — colour coding — resistors, capacitors. Sche- 
matic diagrams — symbols. 


3 


Basic Electronics 


Vacuum Tubes 
Semi-conductors 


Familiarization with purpose, construction and 
types of vacuum tubes — Diodes, Triodes, Tetrodes, 
Pentodes, multi-unit tubes. Thermionic emission — 
space charge. Plate resistance and load. Bias 
methods. Stage gain. 

Familiarization with types, advantages, characteris- 
tics and uses of semi-conductors. Bias. Circuit 
arrangement. 


4 


Radio, 
High-fidelity 
and Sound 
Systems 


AM Receivers 
FM Receivers 

Record Players 


FamiHarization with principles and characteristics. 
Percentage of modulation. Band width and side 
bands. Superheterodyne operation. RF preselec- 
tors. Mixers and converters. Tuner circuits. IF 
amplifiers. Automatic volume control. Tone con- 
trols. Testing, servicing and alignment of vacuum 
tube and transistorized receivers. 

Familiarization with principles and characteristics. 
Terms and definitions. Methods of producing FM. 
Frequency swing. Bandwidth and sidebands. 
Modulation index. Vacuum tube and transistorized 
monaural FM. Tuner circuits. Automatic 
frequency control. IF circuits. Limiter stage FM 
detectors. Tuning indicators. Stereo. Multiplex 
transmission. RF signal characteristics. Vacuum 
tube and transistorized multiplex converter or 
adaptor circuits. Testing, servicing and alignment of 
vacuum tube and transistorized FM receivers. 

Familiarization with monaural and stereo types. 
Turntables and changers. Pick-up cartridges. Load 
impedances. Equalization. Sizes and character- 
istics of stylii. Stereo, preampHfiers and audio 
frequency amplifiers. Testing, servicing and align- 
ment. Use of manuals. 



Reg. 45 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



301 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Tape Recorders 

P. A. Sound Systems 


Familiarization with monaural and stereo reel-to-reel, 
cassette and cartridge types. Vacuum tube and 
transistorized types. 1, 2 and 4 track. Characteris- 
tics and speeds. Mechanical and electronic operation. 
Bias system. Testing, servicing and alignment. 
Use of manuals. 

Famiharization with types and operation. Micro- 
phone types — characteristics. Audio frequency 
preamplifiers and amplifiers. Negative feed back. 
Speakers and multiple speaker systems. Crossover 
networks and impedance matching. Baffles and 
enclosures. Testing and servicing P.A. sound 
systems. 


5 


Black and White 
Television 


Principles 

Circuits and 
Components 


Familiarization with image formation. Picture 
elements. Aspect ratio. Video signal structure. 
Scanning and synchronization. Raster formation. 
Line frame and field frequencies. Transmission — 
channel allocation — bandwidth. Carrier frequencies 
and sideband. 

Familiarization with characteristics of vacuum tube 
and transistorized receivers. Cathode ray tubes. 
Sync, separator circuits. Deflection generators. 
Automatic frequency control circuits. High voltage 
section. Video IF stages. Video detectors. Auto- 
matic gain control circuits. Video amplifiers. 
Audio take-off circuits. Audio IF amphfiers and 
limiters. FM detectors. Audio frequency output 
stages. Tuner circuits. Remote control systems. 
Transmission lines — characteristics. Matching 
networks. Signal boosters and amplifiers. Antenna 
systems and rotators. Low voltage power supplies. 
Testing, servicing and alignment of vacuum tube 
and transistorized Black and White television 
receivers and systems. 


6 


Colour Television 


Colorimetry 

Colour Transmission 

Colour Reception and 
Processing Stages 


Familiarization with characteristics of colour, hue, 

saturation and brightness. Additive colour system 
characteristics. Deficiencies of human colour vision. 

Familiarization with characteristics of the N.T.S.C. 
(National Television System Committee) signal. 
Bandwidth. Basic colour signal analysis (transmitter 
block diagram). 

Familiarization with vector analysis of chroma 
signal for hue and saturation. Basic colour signal 
analysis (receiver block diagram). Video inter- 
mediate frequency amphfiers and video amplifiers, 
including tube and sohd state colour TV delay. 
Automatic fine tuning and indicating circuits. 
Chroma amplifiers. Chroma bandpass. Burst 
amplifiers. Burst automatic frequency control and 



302 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 45 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Colour Receiver 
Servicing 

Picture Tube 
Adjustments 


reactance tubes. Crystal oscillators. Variations in 
chroma sync, chains. Colour killer. Horizontal 
output and high voltage system. 

Trouble-shooting and use of test equipment ; includ- 
ing N.T.S.C. and keyed rainbow colour bar generators, 
bar-dot generators. Adjustment of sweep regulation 
systems and high voltage regulation ; X-ray emission 
precautions. Servicing demodulator, chroma, 
chroma sync, circuits. VIF and chroma alignment. 
Diagnosing and correcting faults in the cathode 
ray tube circuitry. 

Purity, convergence, degaussing and gray-scale 
tracking adjustments. 



O. Reg. 129/70. Sched. 2. 



Reg. 46 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



303 



REGULATION 46 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



SERVICE STATION ATTENDANT 
1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of service 
station attendant ; 

(b) "motor vehicle" means a vehicle propelled 
by an internal combustion engine, or a 
vehicle operated or controlled from a vehicle 
propelled by an internal combustion engine, 
that is registered for use on a highway 
under The Highway Traffic Act and is used 
primarily for the transport of persons, 
equipment or goods but does not include a 
vehicle, 

(i) operated only on rails, 

(ii) used for transportation solely within 
an employer's actual place of bus- 
iness, or 

(iii) used for farming operations but not 
used for carrying a load ; 

(c) "service station attendant" means a person 
engaged in the servicing and maintenance 
of motor vehicles who, 

(i) repairs, changes and balances wheels 
and tires, 

(ii) changes oil in motor vehicles or 
lubricates motor vehicles, including 
lubricating the front wheel bearings 
and drive shaft, 

(iii) supplies motor vehicles with anti- 
freezing solutions, 

(iv) replaces cooling-system hoses, en- 
gine-driven belts and thermostats, 

(v) cleans or replaces spark plugs, 

(vi) installs new or rental batteries or 
battery cables, or recharges bat- 
teries, 



(vii) replaces sealed beam units, light 
bulbs, lenses, fuses and horns, and 



(viii) checks and replenishes fluid levels in 
hydraulic systems. O. Reg. 103/69, 
s. 1. 



2. The trade of service station attendant is desig- 
nated as a certified trade for the purposes of the Act. 
O. Reg. 103/69, s. 2. 

3. No person shall become an apprentice in the 
certified trade unless he has successfully completed 
Grade 8 in Ontario or has such other academic quali- 
fication that, in the opinion of the Director, is equiva- 
lent thereto. O. Reg. 103/69, s. 3. 

4. An apprentice training program for the certi- 
fied trade is established and shall consist of, 

{a) training and instruction at full-time educa- 
tional day classes provided at a College of 
Applied Arts and Technology or in classes 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto ; and 

{b) practical training and instruction provided 
by an employer of the apprentice, 

in the subjects contained in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 103/69, s. 4. 

5. — (1) Subject to subsections 2 and 3, an appren- 
tice shall complete two periods of training and in- 
struction of 1800 hours per period. 

(2) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma or has 
Ontario Grade 12 standing in English, Mathematics 
and Science or has such other academic qualification 
that, in the opinion of the Director, is equivalent 
thereto, he shall complete two periods of training 
and instruction of 1600 hours per period. 

(3) Where the apprentice is the holder of an Ontario 
Secondary School Graduation Diploma majoring in 
auto mechanics or has such other academic qualifi- 
cation that, in the opinion of the Director, is equival- 
ent thereto, he shall complete two periods of training 
and instruction of 1200 hours per period. O. Reg. 
103/69, s. 5. 

6. Sections 8 and 9, subsections 2 and 4 of section 
10 and clause a of section 13 of the Act do not apply 
to any person who works or is employed in the 
certified trade. O. Reg. 103/69, s. 6. 

7. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the 
certified trade whether for his regular daily hours or 
for hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall not 
be less than, 

(a) 60 per cent during the first period of train- 
ing and instruction ; and 



304 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 46 



{b) 80 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction, 

of the average rate of wages for journeymen em- 
ployed by the employer in that trade or, where the 
employer is the only journeyman employed, of the 
average rate of wages for journeymen in the area. 
O. Reg. 103/69,5.7. 



8. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
are the subjects set out in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 103/69, s. 8. 

9. A certificate of qualification in the certified 
trade remains in force until cancelled or suspended 
in accordance with the regulations. O. Reg. 103/69, 
s. 9. 



Schedule 



SERVICE STATION ATTENDANT 



Part 1 
In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 




Mathematics 


Arithmetic 
Geometry 


-Addition, subtraction and division of whole numbers 
and fractions, ratio and proportion, areas and 
volumes. 

Lines, planes and angles. 


2 


Science 


Physics \ 
Mechanics / 


Basic laws and principles, formulae. (Given as 
required in shop instruction.) 


3 


EngHsh 


Basic Usage and 

Business 

Communications 


Trade terminology and usage. Letter and report 
writing. Work and parts orders. Interpretation 
and use of manufacturers' manuals. 


4 


General Shop 
Practice 


Safety 

Hand Tools 

Power Tools 
Benchwork Operations 

Fastening Devices 


Safety rules and safe operating procedures. First aid. 
Fire prevention. Use and maintenance of fire- 
fighting equipment. Handling of gasoline, oils and 
cleaning solvents. Danger of carbon monoxide 
fumes. Correct use of lifting and hoisting equip- 
ment. Good housekeeping. 

Selection and use of hammers, punches, chisels, pliers, 
wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers, hacksaws, files, 
scrapers, snips, clamps, vises, drill bits, reamers, taps 
and dies, stud extractors. 

Use of portable air and electric drills and impact 
tools. 

Cutting with hacksaw, filing, scraping, drilling, use of 
drill press and bench grinder, (irinding of drill bits, 
chisels, etc. Soldering, gasket making, oxy-acetylene 
welding and cutting. Brazing techniques. Care and 
maintenance of welding equipment. Use of rules, 
straight edges and squares. 

Types of bolts, nuts, studs, screws and tube fittings. 
Thread identification and classification. Tensile 
strengths. Installation procedures, tightening 



Reg. 46 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



305 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Item 








Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 








torques, cutting internal and external threads, remov- 
ing broken studs. Types of rivets, keys, springs, flat 
and lock washers, snap rings, circlips, cotter pins. 
Installation and removal. Thread lubricants and 








sealers. 






General Shop 
Equipment 


Capacities and correct usage of floor cranes, hoists, 
jacks, stands. Operation and maintenance of de- 
greasing and steamcleaning equipment and air 
compressors. Characteristics, capacities and use of 
tow trucks and related vehicle recovery equipment. 
Care and use of lubrication equipment. 


5 


Internal 

Combustion 

Kngines 


Basic Knowledge 
and Terminology 


Operating principles. 2 and 4 stroke cycles. Engine 
designs: in-line, V-type, opposed piston, flat or pan- 
cake. 


6 


Lubrication 


Types and 
Classification of 
Lubricants 


Identification, properties and characteristics of oils: 
Heavy duty (detergent), regular— (non-detergent). 
S. A. E. viscosity ratings. A.P.I, classifications. Other 
types of oils and greases. Additives. Frequency of 
change intervals. 






Engine Lubricating 
Systems 


Function. Lubricant feeds, oil pumps, pressure con- 
trol. Inspection procedures. Detection of leaks. 
By-pass and full-flow oil filters; maintenance and 
replacement. Flushing lubricating systems. Correct 
levels. Positive crankcase ventilation systems; 
inspection, testing and servicing. 






Open Drive Shafts 


Characteristics; support bearings, universal joints, 
slip joints. Lubrication and sealing. Disassembly, 
relubing, reassembly and reinstallation. Torquing 
universal trunnions. 






Driving Axles and 
Differentials 


Characteristics; gears and bearings. Oil sealing and 
venting. Lubricants. Filling and checking oil levels. 






Standard 
Transmissions 


Characteristics; gears, bearings, components. Lubri- 
cants. Draining and refilhng. Correct levels. 






Automatic 
Transmissions 


Characteristics of operation. Cleanliness. Trans- 
mission fluids. Oil seals and vents. Draining, re- 
filling and checking fluid levels. 






Suspension Systems 


Lubricating suspension components and friction 
proofing spring leafs. Sealed systems. 






Steering Systems 
A (Manual) 


Characteristics of steering box gearing. Lubricants. 
Filling and checking levels. 






B (Power) 


Characteristics of power steering systems. Oil seals 
and vents. Types of fluid, capacities. Filling and 
checking system levels. 



306 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 46 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 




■ 


C (Linkages) 

Front Wheel Bearings 

Generators, 
Alternators, Starters 

Miscellaneous Linkage 
and Cables 

Carburetor Air 
Cleaners 

Lubrication 
Certification 


Characteristics; bushings and joints. Methods of 
sealing and lubricating movable steering joints. 
Sealed systems. 

Types and characteristics. Lubrication; adjusting 
or torquing. Replacing oil seals. 

Types and characteristics of bearings used. Bushes, 
ball bearings; lubricated and prepacked lubricant 
type. Correct type and amount of lubricant where 
necessary. 

Throttle, clutch, gearshift, and emergency brake 
linkage. Lubricant and lubrication methods where 
necessary. 

Types and characteristics of air cleaners and filters. 
Inspection, maintenance and replacement. 

Certification of lubricant and filter changes and re- 
lubing of bearings and components. Extended 
warranties. 


7 


Cooling Systems 


Components, 
Operation, Inspection 
and Maintenance 

Hoses and Clamps 
Thermostats 


Air and liquid cooled systems and components. 
Types of circuits. Coolant, additives. Pressurized 
systems. Test methods and equipment. Hazards in- 
volved. Coolant levels. Testing of anti-freeze. 
Checking for leaks. Cooling system cleaning. 
Pressure and flow testing radiators. Automatic 
transmission and engine oil coolers. 

Characteristics. Inspecting, installing, sealing hoses. 
Stiffening springs. Sealing corripounds. 

Types, and function. Inspecting, testing and re- 
placement. 


8 


Electrical 
Systems 


Batteries, Cables, 
Hold-downs 

Lights 


Characteristics and function of lead acid batteries. 
Electro-chemical action. Electrolyte. Ampere-hour 
ratings. Inspecting and testing. Use of voltmeters, 
ammeters, load resistances and hydrometers. Bat- 
tery charging. Charging and handling hazards. 
Removal, servicing and installation of batteries and 
associated parts. Dry-charged batteries; activation 
procedures. 

Vehicle lighting regulations. Characteristics of 
lights. Bulbs and seal beam units. Candle power 
and wattage ratings. Lenses and holders. Head- 
light aiming equipment. Aiming, testing, installing 
and repairing lights. Circuit fuses. Grounding. 
Signal lights; flasher units. 



Reg. 46 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



307 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Horns 

Electric Windshield 
Wipers 

Windshield Washers 

Miscellaneous 
Circuits 


Characteristics of automotive horns; electric, air- 
vacuum, etc. Blending notes. Controlling air- 
vacuum horns. Inspecting and adjusting horns. 
Circuit fuses. 

Characteristics of windshield wipers. Drives and 
linkage. Electric ; single and multi-speed. 
Vacuum type. Operation. Speed controls. Washer 
cycling. Circuit fuses. Checking, replacing and 
adjusting wiper blades and arms. 

Characteristics; automatic and manual operation. 
Fluids and additives. Instalhng, repairing, or re- 
placing windshield washers and controls. Aiming 
fluid nozzles. 

Characteristics of generator, alternator and power 
assist mechanism circuits. Circuit fuses. 


9 


Ignition Systems 


Spark Plugs 


Characteristics, and operation. Heat ranges. Radio 
suppression. Erosion of electrodes. Analyzing 
deposits. Cleaning, testing, filing, gapping and 
installing. Torquing. 


10 


Brake Systems 


Hydraulic Brakes 


Characteristics of brake operating systems and com- 
ponents. Checking for external leaks. Replenishing 
system. Approved fluids. 


11 


Belt Drives 


"V" Belts 


Characteristics; inspecting, instalhng and adjusting. 
Effects of tight or worn and loose belts on coohng, 
charging, power steering and air conditioning sys- 
tems. 


12 


Exhaust 
Systems 


Mufflers, 

Resonators, Exhaust 
and Tail Pipes 


Types and features of exhaust systems. Single, dual 
and resonators with mufflers. Cross-over pipes. 
Heat riser passages. Back pressure. Emission con- 
trols. Exhaust system insulators, hangers, brackets 
and clamps. Replacing exhaust systems. Use of 
gas cutting and welding equipment for removal, 
stress relieving. 


13 


Accessories 


Rear View Mirrors 


Installation procedures. Care of car finish. 


14 


Wheels and Tires 


Wheels and Rims 

Tires, Tubes and 
Valves 


Types and characteristics : single and dual. Removal 
and installation. Wheel wrenches. Wheel to hub 
fastening and locating devices. Handling heavy 
wheels and tires. Inspecting and servicing. Run-out. 

Types, sizes, characteristics and application. De- 
mounting and mounting. Equipment and lubricants. 
Repairing tires, tubes and valves. Tire inflatibn 
precautions. Inspection for damage, wear and faults. 
Tire rotation. Retreads. 



308 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 46 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Balancing Wheels 
and Tires 


Wheel balancing equipment. Balancing wheels and 
related parts. Static and dynamic balance. Weight 
installation. 


15 


Running 

Maintenance 

Inspections 


Inspection 
Procedure 

Starting Engines 


Development of quick visual checking procedures for 
excessive wear and looseness in steering linkage, 
components and wheel bearings. Buckled wheels, 
broken springs or leafs, weak shock absorbers and 
worn mountings. Defective clutch, service or emer- 
gency brake operation. Defective engine and 
transmission mountings. Worn or loose universal 
joints. Worn or defective tires, tubes and valves. 
Misalignment. Faults in exhaust systems. Defec- 
tive lights, batteries and hold-downs, wiring and 
cables. Coolant, oil and fluid leaks. Deteriorated 
hoses, loose clamps, damaged lines. Loose or worn 
"V" belts. Defective windshield wipers and washers. 
Overdue lubrication requirements, oil and air-filter 
changes: Reporting of defects or conditions. 

Starting engines under adverse conditions due to: 
condensation in ignition system, fuel flooded engines, 
fouled spark plugs, cold temperatures, discharged 
batteries. Use of batteries and jumper cables. 
Correct connections. 


16 


Shop 
Management 


Parts Ordering 
Costing 

Quality Control 

Discipline and PubHc 
Relations 


Parts replacement ; identification of parts and vehicle 
by year, model and serial number. Availabihty of 
parts. Discounts. 

Average operation times. Time cards. Work orders. 
Elementary bookkeeping. Labour and material 
costs. Overhead. Stock records, preparation of 
typical bills for servicing vehicles. 

Quality of workmanship) — acceptable standards. 

Employee attitude. Good customer relations. Cour- 
tesy, appearance, handling complaints. Protection 
of customers' vehicles and personal property. 



Reg. 46 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



309 



Part 2 
Work Instruction and Experience 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Item 








Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


General Shop 
Practice 


General 


Safety rules and removal of all safety hazards. 
Use of hand and power tools, measuring and fasten- 
ing devices and general shop equipment. 
Benchwork operations. 
(As detailed in Part L) 


2 


Internal 

Combustion 

Engines 


Basic Knowledge 
and Terminology 


Basic knowledge of operating principles. Familiariz- 
ation with trade terminology and usage. 


3 


Lubrication 


Lubricants 


Familiarization with characteristics, classification 
and ratings; contamination and deterioration, fre- 
quency of change intervals. 






Engine Lubricating 
Systems 


Detection of leaks. By-pass and full-flow oil filters; 
inspection, maintenance and replacement. Flushing 
lubricating systems. Checking levels. Testing and 
servicing P.C.V. systems. 






Drive Shafts 


Open drive shafts; support bearings, universal joints, 
slip joints. Disassembly, relubing, reassembly and 
reinstallation. Torquing. 






Axles and 
Differentials 

Standard 
Transmissions 


Lubricants. Draining, filling and checking fluid 
levels. 






Automatic 
Transmissions 


Automatic transmission fluids. Draining, refilling 
and checking fluid levels. 






Suspension Systems 


Lubricating suspension components ; friction proofing 
spring leafs. Sealed systems. 






Steering Systems 
(Manual) 


Lubricants. Filling and checking steering box 
lubricant levels. 






(Power) 


Fluid types ; capacities. FiUing and checking system 
levels. 






(Linkages) 


Lubricants. Relubing. Sealed systems. 






Front Wheel 
Bearings 


Relubricating, adjusting or torquing. Oil seal 
replacement. 






Generators, 
Alternators, Starters 


Correct type and amount of lubricant where neces- 
sary. 






Miscellaneous Linkage 
and Cables 


Throttle, clutch, gearshift, and emergency brake. 
Lubricants; and lubrication where necessary. 



310 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 46 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Carburetor, 
Air Cleaners 

Certification 


Inspection, maintenance and replacement. 

Lubrication and filter change certification to comply 
with warranties. 


4 


Cooling Systems 


Liquid Cooled 
Systems 


Pressure testing. Testing anti-freeze solutions. 
Checking for leaks. Cleaning procedures. Radiator 
flow testing. Inspection and installation of hoses and 
clamps. Thermostats; testing and replacement. 


5 


Electrical 
Systems 


Batteries, Cables, 
Hold-Downs 

Lights 

Horns 

Electric Windshield 
Wipers 

Windshield Washers 
Miscellaneous Circuits 


Removal, servicing and installation. Inspection and 
testing; use of voltmeters, ammeters, load resistances 
and hydrometers. Battery charging. Checking 
electrolyte levels. Activating dry-charged batteries. 

Replacement of bulbs, seal beam units and lenses. 
Aiming, testing and repairing lights. Fuse and 
flasher unit replacement. 

Inspecting and adjusting horns. Fuse replacement. 

Fuse replacement. Checking, replacing and adjust- 
ing wiper arms and blades. 

Installing, repairing, or replacing windshield washers 
and controls. Aiming fluid nozzles. Fluids and 
additives. 

Charging and power assist mechanism circuits. Fuse 
replacement. 


6 


Ignition Systems 


Spark Plugs 


Cleaning, testing, filing, gapping and installation. 
Analyzing deposits. Torquing. 


7 


Brake Systems 


Hydraulic Brakes 


Filling and checking reservoir levels. Approved 
fluids. Checking for external leaks. 


8 


Belt Drives 


"V" Belts 


Inspection, installation and adjustment. 


9 


Exhaust Systems 


Mufflers, Resonators, 
Exhaust and Tail 
Pipes 


Replacement of complete systems or parts. Use of 
gas cutting and welding equipment for removal and 
stress-relieving. 


10 


Accessories 


Rear View Mirrors 


Installation. Car finish care. 




Wheels and Tires 


Wheels and Rims 

Tires, Tubes and 
Valves 

Wheel and Tire 
Balancing 


Removal and installation. Inspecting and servicing 
wheels and rims. Checking run-out. 

Demounting and mounting. Inspection for damage, 
wear and faults. Repairing tires, tubes and valves. 
Inflation precautions. Tire rotation. 

Use of on and off vehicle balancing equipment. In- 
stallation of weights. 



Reg. 46 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



311 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


12 


Running 

Maintenance 

Inspections 


Inspection 
Procedures 

Starting Engines 


Quick visual checking to ascertain excessive wear, 
damage, defective operation, deterioration, leaks, 
overdue lubrication requirements, filter changes and 
P.C.V. servicing. Reporting conditions. 

Starting engines under adverse conditions caused by: 
ignition system condensation, carburetor flooding, 
fouled spark plugs, cold temperatures, discharged 
batteries. Use of booster batteries and jumper cables. 


13 


Shop 


Parts Ordering 
Management 

Costing 

Quality Control 
Public Relations 


Ordering parts by vehicle year, model and serial 
number. 

Elementary bookkeeping. Preparing work orders. 
Maintaining stock records. Billing customers. 

Standard of workmanship acceptable. 

Good customer relations; courtesy, appearance, 
handling complaints. Protection of customers' 
vehicles and personal property. 



O. Reg. 103/69, Sched. 



312 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 47 



REGULATION 47 



under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 

SHEET METAL WORKERS 
I. In this Regulation, 



(a) "certified trade" means the trade of sheet 
metal worker ; 

(b) "sheet metal worker" means a person who, 

(i) manufactures, fabricates, assembles, 
handles, erects, installs, dismantles, 
reconditions, adjusts, alters, repairs 
or services all ferrous and non-fer- 
rous sheet metal work of No. 10 U.S. 
Gauge or of any equivalent or Hghter 
gauge and all other materials used 
in lieu thereof, and 

(ii) reads and understands shop and field 
sketches used in fabrication and 
erection, including those taken from 
original architectural and engineer- 
ing drawings or sketches, 
but does not include a person employed in 
production commonly known as mass pro- 
duction. O. Reg. 229/65, s. L 

2. The trade of sheet metal worker is designated as 
a certified trade for the purposes of the Act. O. Reg. 
229/65, s. 2. 

3. — (1) An apprentice training program is estab- 
lished for the certified trade and, subject to sub- 
section 2, shall consist of five periods of training and 
instruction of 1,800 hours each, 

(a) at full-time day classes provided at a Col- 
lege of Applied Arts and Technology in 
the courses contained in Schedule 1 ; and 

(6) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by an employer in the courses con- 
tained in Schedule 2. 

(2) Where the apprentice holds a Secondary 
School Graduation Diploma from a sheet metal 
course, the apprentice training program shall con- 
sist of five periods of training and instruction of 
1600 hours each. O. Reg. 229/65, s. 3, revised. 



4. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the 
trade whether for his regular daily hours or for 
hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall not be 
less than, 



(fl) 40 per cent during the first period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 

(6) 50 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; 

(c) 60 per cent during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 

(d) 70 per cent during the fourth period of 
training and instruction ; and 

(e) 80 per cent during the fifth period of train- 
ing and instruction, 



of the rate of wages or its equivalent for a journeyman 
employed by the same employer in the certified trade. 
O. Reg. 229/65, s. 4. 



5. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the certified trade shall not 
exceed, 



(a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
trade, one apprentice plus an additional 
apprentice for each four journeymen em- 
ployed by the employer in the trade ; and 



(b) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the trade, one apprentice for the first 
journeyman employed by the employer 
plus an additional apprentice for each 
additional four journeymen employed by 
the employer in the trade. O. Reg. 229/65, 
S.5. 

6. A certificate of qualification expires with the 
last day of February in each year. O. Reg. 229/65, 
s.6. 



Reg. 47 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



313 



Schedule 1 

SHEET METAL WORKERS 
In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Air conditioning 


Gravity and forced air heating ventilation. 


2 


Drafting 


Print and specification reading. 


3 


Industrial chemistry 


Oxidation, carbonization, fluxes, acids, bases and salts, cor- 
rosion, heat and gases. 


4 


Sheet metal practice 


Fabrication, assembly, installation and testing of complete 
and sub-units. 


5 


Welding 


Electric, gas and spot welding, safety. 


6 


Mathematics 


Measurement, quantities, geometry and such mathematics as 
is related to chemistry. 


7 


Industrial economics 


As related to repair and maintenance. 


8 


Metallurgy 


Uses and characteristics of ferrous and non-ferrous metals 
and alloys. 



O. Reg. 229/65, Sched. 



Schedule 2 

SHEET METAL WORKERS 

Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


Shop technique 


Shop practice relating to use of hand, portable and power 
tools, metals and equipment. 


2 


Pattern development 


Parallel, radial, triangulation and directly applied paper 
patterns. 


3 


Cutting 


Straight, curved or combinations in all types of metal in 
general use in the trade. 



314 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 47 





Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


4 


Forming 


Bending, stretching and manipulating sheet metal. 


5 


Joining 


Seaming, rivetting, spot welding, welding, soldering, screwing 
and bolting. 


6 


Assembling 


Complete and sub-units. 


7 


Installation 


Complete or sub-assemblies in the shop or in the field. 



O. Reg. 229/65,Sched. 2. 



Reg. 48 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



315 



REGULATION 48 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



STEAMFITTERS 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of steam- 
fitter; 

(b) "steamfitter" means a person who, 

(i) lays out, assembles, installs, main- 
tains or repairs any heating system, 
cooling system, process system or 
industrial system, 

(ii) installs or connects piping in any 
building or structure, 

(iii) installs the piping for any process, 
including a process that'conveys gas, 
or the tubing for any pneumatic or 
air-handling system, or 

(iv) reads and understands design draw- 
ings, manufacturers' literature and 
installation diagrams for any system 
referred to in subclause i, 

but does not include a person engaged in the 
manufacture of equipment, or the assembly 
of a unit, prior to dehvery to a building, 
structure or site. O. Reg. 226/65, s. 1. 

2. The trade of steamfitter is designated as a cer- 
tified trade for the purposes of the Act. O. Reg. 
226/65, s. 2. 

3. — (1) An apprentice training program is estab- 
lished and shall consist of five periods of training and 
instruction of 1800 hours each, 

(j) at full-time educational day classes pro- 
vided at a College of Applied Arts and 
Technology in the courses contained in 
Schedule 1 ; and 

{b) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by an employer of the apprentice in 
the courses contained in Schedule 2. 

(2) An apprentice who holds a Secondary School 
Graduation Diploma is entitled to, 

{a) a credit of 450 hours for the first period of 
training and instruction ; and 

{b) a further credit of 450 hours at the end of 
each of the first, second and third periods of 
training and instruction if he obtains at 
least 75 per cent on an examination pre- 
scribed by the Director. O. Reg. 226/65, 
s. 3, revised. 



4. Any person who, 

(a) applies in the prescribed form for appren- 
ticeship in the certified trade ; and 

(b) becomes an apprentice in the certified trade 
within three months after commencing to 
work in that trade, 

is exempt from subsection 2 of section 10 of the Act. 
O. Reg. 226/65, s. 4. 

5. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the cer- 
tified trade whether for his regular hours or for hours 
in excess of his daily hours shall not be less than, 

{a) 40 per cent during the first period of training 
and instruction ; 

(b) 50 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; 

(c) 60 per cent during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 

{d) 70 per cent during the fourth period of 
training and instruction ; and 

(e) 80 per cent during the fifth period of train- 
ing and instruction, 

of the hourly rate of wages or its equivalent for a 
journeyman employed by the same employer in the 
certified trade and with whom the apprentice is work- 
ing. O. Reg. 226/65, s. 5. 

6. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the certified trade shall not 
exceed, 

{a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
trade, one apprentice plus an additional 
apprentice for every five journeymen em- 
ployed by the employer in the trade and 
with whom the apprentice is working ; and 

(6) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the trade, one apprentice for the first jour- 
neyman employed by the employer plus an 
additional apprentice for each additional 
five journeymen employed by the employer 
in the trade and with whom the apprentice 
is working. O. Reg. 226/65, s. 6. 

7. A certificate of qualification expires with the 
28th day of February in each year. O. Reg. 226/65, 

S.7. 



316 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 48 



Schedule 1 
STEAMFITTERS 

In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject Matter 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Building Construction 


Concrete, steel, wood, plastic, underground. Safety code. 


2 


Drafting 


Print and specification reading. 


3 


Welding equipment 


Gas equipment as related to metal bending and heating, safety. 


4 


Mathematics 


Measurement, quantities, capacities and such mathematics as 
is related to science. 


5 


Science 


Pressure, heat, properties of steam, work, fuels, corrosion and 
oxidation, metallurgy, electrolysis, chemistry of water. 


6 


Steamfitting practice 


Preparation, aligning, joining, assembling and installing com- 
plete or sub-units. 


7 


Industrial economics 


As related to repair and maintenance. 



O. Reg. 226/65, Sched. 1. 



Schedule 2 

STEAMFITTERS 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject Matter 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


Shop Technique 


Shop practice relating to the use of hand tools, portable tools 
and power tools and equipment. 


2 


Pipe Materials 


Metal and plastic. 


3 


Pipe Preparation 


Reaming, flaring, threading, cutting. 


4 


Pipe Forming 


Bending. 


5 


Pipe Joining 


Flanges, swing, scissor and expansion type joints and their 
related seals and gaskets. 



Reg. 48 APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



317 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


6 


Pumps 


Pressure and vacuum. 


7 


Controls and Valves 


Safety, manual, semi-automatic and automatic. 


8 


Installation 


Align, support and secure complete or sub-assemblies in the 
shop or in the field. 



O. Reg. 226/65, Sched. 2. 



318 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 49 



REGULATION 49 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



TRANSMISSION MECHANIC 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of trans- 
mission mechanic ; 

(6) "motor vehicle" means a vehicle propelled 
by an internal combustion engine, or a 
vehicle operated or controlled from a 
vehicle propelled by an internal combustion 
engine, that is registered for use on a high- 
way under The Highway Traffic Act and is 
used primarily for the transport of persons, 
equipment or goods but does not include a 
vehicle, 

(i) operated only on rails, 

(ii) used for transportation solely within 
an employer's actual place of busi- 



(iii) used for farming operations but not 
used for carrying a load ; 

(c) "transmission mechanic" means a person 
engaged in the repair and maintenance of 
motor vehicles who inspects, maintains and 
repairs motor vehicle transmissions. O. Reg. 
95/69, s.l. 

2. The trade of transmission mechanic is desig- 
nated as a certified trade for the purposes of the 
Act. O. Reg. 95/69, s. 2. 

3. An apprentice training program for the cer- 
tified trade is established and shall consist of, 

(a) training and instruction at full-time edu- 
cational day classes provided at a College 
of Applied Arts and Technology or in classes 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto; and 

(b) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by an employer of the apprentice, 

in the subjects contained in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 95/69, s. 3. 

4. — (1) Subject to subsections 2 and 3, an appren- 
tice shall complete three periods of training and 
instruction of 1800 hours per period. 



(2) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma or 
has Ontario Grade 12 standing in English, Mathe- 
matics and Science or has such other academic quali- 
fication that, in the opinion of the Director, is 
equivalent thereto, he shall complete three periods 
of training and instruction of 1600 hours per period. 

(3) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma 
majoring in auto mechanics or has such other 
academic quahfication that, in the opinion of the 
Director, is equivalent thereto, he shall complete 
three periods of training and instruction of 1200 
hours per period. O. Reg. 95/69, s. 4. 



5. Any person who, 

{a) applies in the prescribed form for appren- 
ticeship in the certified trade ; and 

{b) becomes an apprentice in the certified trade 
within three months after commencing to 
work in that trade, 

is exempt from subsection 2 of section 10 of the Act. 
O. Reg. 95/69, s. 5. 



6. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the 
certified trade whether for his regular daily hours or 
for hours in excess of his regular daily hours shall not 
be less than, 

{a) 50 per cent during the first period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 

(6) 70 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; and 

(c) 90 per cent during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction, 

of the average rate of wages for journeymen em- 
ployed by the employer in that trade or, where the 
employer is the only journeyman employed, of the 
average rate of wages for journeymen in the area. 
O. Reg. 95/69, s. 6. 



7. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
are the subjects set out in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 95/69, s. 7. 



Reg. 49 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



319 



Schedule 

TRANSMISSION MECHANIC 

Part 1 

In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Mathematics 


Arithmetic 
Geometry 


Addition, subtraction. and division of whole numbers 
and fractions, ratio and proportion, areas and 
volumes. 

Lines, planes and angles. 


2 


Science 


Physics 
Mechanics 


Basic laws and principles, formulae. (Given as 
required in shop instruction.) 


3 


EngHsh 


Basic Usage and 

Business 

Communications 


Trade terminology and usage. Letter and report 
writing. Work and parts orders. Interpretation and 
use of manufacturers' manuals. 


4 


Drafting 


Basic Drafting and 
Interpretation 


Preparation of elementary working drawings and 
dimensioned sketches of automotive components. 
Interpretation of exploded drawings, electrical and 
hydraulic circuits and schematics used in manu- 
facturers' manuals. 


5 


General Shop 
Practice 


Safety 

Hand Tools 

Power Tools 

Benchwork 
Operations 

Measuring 
Instruments 


Safety rules and safe operating procedures. First 
aid. Fire prevention. Use and maintenance of fire- 
fightliig equipment. Handling of gasoline, oils and 
cleaning solvents. Danger of carbon monoxide fumes. 
Correct use of Ulting and hoisting equipment. Good 
housekeeping. 

Selection and use of hammers, punches, chisels, 
pliers, wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers, hacksaws, 
files, drifts, scrapers, snips, clamps, vises, drill bits, 
reamers, taps and dies. Stud extractors. Hones. 

Care and use of portable air and electric drills, 
grinders and impact tools. 

Cutting with hacksaw, fiUing, scraping, drilling; use 
of drill press. Use of benchgrinder ; grinding of drill 
bits, chisels, etc. Fitting bushings, honing, cutting 
and flaring tubing. Soldering. Gasket making. 
Oxy-acetylene and arc welding and cutting. Brazing 
techniques. Care and maintenance of welding 
equipment. 

Use of rules, straight edges and squares. Feeler 
gauges, calipers, verniers, micrometers, telescopic 
gauges, dial indicators and pressure gauges. 



320 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 49 





Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Item 








Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






Fastening Devices 


Types of bolts, nuts, studs, screws, and tube fittings. 
Thread identification and classification. Tensile 
strengths. Installation procedures. Tightening 
torques. Cutting internal and external threads. 
Removing broken studs. "Heli-Coil" inserts. 

Types of rivets, keys, springs, flat and lock washers, 
snap rings, circlips, cotter pins. Installation and 
removal. Thread lubricants, sealers and locking 
compounds. 






General Shop 
Equipment 


Types, purpose, capacities and correct usage of floor 
cranes, hoists, 'jacks, stands, hydraulic presses, 
pullers. Operation and maintenance of degreasing 
and steam-cleaning equipment. 


6 


Internal 

Combustion 

Engines 


Principles and Types 


Principles of operation. 2 stroke and 4 stroke cycles. 
Engine types — single and multi-cyhnder. InHne, 
"V" types, slanted, horizontal, etc. 






Engine components 


Function of major engine components. Heat dis- 
sipation, effects of cyUnder wear and defective valves 
on engine performance. Vacuum and compression 
tests. 






Lubrication 

Systems 


Types and function of lubricating systems. Charac- 
teristics of lubricants: Detergent, non-detergent. 
S.A.E. viscosity ratings, A.P.I, classification. Addi- 
tives. 






Cooling Systems 


Air and liquid cooled systems. Temperature indi- 
cating and controlling devices. Automatic trans- 
mission coolers. Purpose, testing and hazards of 
pressurized systems. Coolant, additives, sealers and 
anti-freeze. 






Fuel Systems 


Principles of carburetor operation, circuits and 
systems. Operating characteristics of an engine 
attributable to the carburetor. Effects of carburetor 
adjustments on engine performance and automatic 
transmission operation. Use of tachometers and 
vacuum gauges. Engine speed settings; adjustments 
to operating linkage and effect on automatic trans- 
mission operation. Effects of dash pots, throttle 
return checks, anti-stall devices on engine operation. 






Fuel Injection 
Systems 


Principles of operation. Differences between gasoline 
and diesel systems. Shutting down runaway engines. 






Fuel Systems 
(Liquefied Petroleum 

Gas) 


Types, characteristics, use and operation of L.P.G. 
systems. 



Reg. 49 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



321 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


7 


Electrical 
Systems 


Basic Electricity 

Automotive 
Electrical Circuits 

Batteries 

PrimaryCircuit 
Switches and 
Resistors 

Primary and 
Secondary Circuits 

Starter Motors 


Definition of amperes, voltage, resistance, Ohm's 
Law. Electron flow, -electro-magnetism. Series and 
parallel circuits. Voltage drop. Use of voltmeters, 
ammeters and ohmmeters. Conductors and insu- 
lators. 

Automotive wire and cables. Insulation materials. 
Joining, splicing and soldering wires and cables. 
Removal and installation of terminals, connectors 
and plugs. Effects of temperature, shorts, grounds, 
poor connections. Resistances and fuses. Identi- 
fication, tracing and testing of circuits. 

Principles, and function of lead acid batteries. In- 
spection and testing. Charging methods; hazards 
involved. 

Types, function and characteristics. Safety features 
— automatic transmission protection. 

Equipment and procedures for testing primary and 
secondary circuits. Effects of defective primary and 
secondary circuits on vehicle operation. Effects of 
suppression equipment on tests. 

Motor solenoids and switches. Solenoid circuits. 
Neutral safety switch. 


8 


Power Trains 


Clutches 

Standard 
Transmissions 


Characteristics and construction features; single 
plate, multi-plate. Function o-f controls: mechanical, 
hydraulic, vacuum, air and electrically operated. 
Adjustments. Removal, disassembly, inspection 
and overhaul of clutches and components. Cleaning 
methods. Assembly lubricants. Clutch reinstal- 
lation. Aligning procedures. Control adjustment. 
Clearances. Testing. 

Characteristics of spur gears, planetary gears (over- 
drives). Synchronizing mechanisms, over-running 
clutches, dog clutches and internal shift mechanisms. 
Characteristics of manual shift transmissions (pas- 
senger and commercial vehicles), over-drive units, 
and auxiliary transmissions. Gear ratios. Trans- 
mission control mechanisms; direct, remote and 
assist mechanisms. Servicing and adjusting. Lu- 
brication. Oil sealing and venting. Removal of 
transmissions and controls. Construction features 
of transmission components. Overhauling trans- 
missions, linkages and controls. Cleanliness. In- 
spection procedures. Serviceability of parts and 
components. Maintaining operating relationship of, 
parts. Gear and spline fits. Reinstallation and'" 
adjusting controls. Testing. 



322 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 49 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Automatic 
Transmissions 



Drive Shafts 



Characteristics and construction features of auto- 
matic transmissions. .Transmission cooling. Mecha- 
nical, electrical, vacuum operated controls. Prin- 
ciples of operation of planetary gears, friction 
clutches, over-running clutches, servos, bands and 
drums, fluid couplings and torque converters. Hy- 
draulic components and circuits. Transmission 
fluids. Draining, refilling, and level checking pro- 
cedures. Oil seals and vents. Shop test procedures; 
performance characteristics: shifting, non-shifting. 
Specifications. Band and linkage adjustments, con- 
trol settings, checking external connections and fluid 
levels prior to tests. Effects of defective engines, 
related components and worn parts on transmission 
operation. Tools and testing equipment. Pressure 
testing transmission oil circuits; interpretation of 
results. Locating fluid leaks. Fluid characteristics 
due to burnt clutch or band linings. Air testing 
transmission circuits and units with controls par- 
tially disassembled. Stall testing transmissions. 
Testing oil — coolers. Effects of leaks. Results of 
introducing air into pressure circuits. Overhauling 
automatic transmissions. Pre-disassembly inspec- 
tion. Removal and replacement. Tools and equip- 
ment for handling and lifting automatic transmissions. 
Gauges and test equipment. Marking and protect- 
ing parts during disassembly. Cleanliness. Clean- 
ing solvents. Inspection of parts. Tolerance speci- 
fications. Fits and clearances. Torquing procedures. 
Air testing components on reassembly. Road and 
dynamometer tests. 

Characteristics of open drive shafts, support bear- 
ings, universal joints, shp joints and enclosed drive 
lines. Disassembly, overhaul or relubing, reassembly 
and reinstallation. Torquing. Effects of imbalance. 



Part 2 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


General Shop 
Practice 


General 


Safety rules and removal of all safety hazards. 
Use of hand and power tools, measuring instruments, 
fastening devices, general shop equipment. Bench- 
work operations. 
(As detailed in Part 1.) 



Reg. 49 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



323 



Column 



Item 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Internal 

Combustion 

Engines 



Engine Operation 



Familiarization with characteristics of correctly 
functioning engines. Use of dynamometers, ana- 
lyzing and test equipment and road tests to diagnose 
engine malfunction and faults in cooling, fuel and 
electrical systems, affecting power assisted clutch — 
standard transmission operation, automatic trans- 
mission operation, for corrective action. 



Power Trains 



Clutches 



Standard 
Transmissions 



Automatic 
Transmissions 



Drive Shafts 



Single and multiplate; mechanical, hydraulic, va- 
cuum, air and electrically operated controls; ser- 
vicing and adjustment. Removal, disassembly, 
cleaning, inspection, overhauling and reinstal- 
lation. Control adjustments and clearances. Test- 
ing. 

Standard transmissions; direct and remote controls, 
power assist mechanisms, over-drives, auxiliary 
drives. Servicing and adjustment. Removal, dis- 
assembly, cleaning, inspection, overhaul and re- 
installation. Control adjustments. Lubrication. 
Testing. 

Shop testing; preliminary band and linkage adjust- 
ments; mechanical, electrical and vacuum control 
settings; checking of external connections and fluid 
levels. Familiarization with performance charac- 
teristics and specifications. Pressure testing trans- 
mission oil circuits; locating fluid leaks; interpreta- 
tion of results. Air testing circuits and units (con- 
trols, partially disassembled). Testing oil coolers. 
Stall testing automatic transmissions. Transmission 
removal. Pre-disassembly inspection. Disassembly, 
cleaning, inspection and overhaul procedures for 
planetary gears, friction clutches, over-running 
clutches, servos, bands and drums, fluid couplings, 
torque converters and hydraulic components. Tor- 
quing procedures. Air testing components on re- 
assembly. Reinstallation of transmissions; control 
adjustments and settings. Road and dynamometer 
testing. 

Open drive shafts, support bearings, universal joints, 
slip joints. Enclosed drive lines. Removal, dis- 
assembly, overhaul, reassembly and reinstallation. 
Torquing. 



O. Reg. 95/69, Sched. 



324 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 50 



REGULATION 50 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



TRUCK-TRAILER REPAIRER 
1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of truck- 
trailer repairer ; 

(6) "truck-trailer" means any type of trailer 
vehicle, including a single or multi-axle 
semi-trailer whereby part of the load is car- 
ried on the tractor unit by means of the 
upper and lower coupler assembly, and a 
full load bearing trailer, normally hauled by 
a truck unit, that is registered for use on a 
highway under The Highway Traffic Act 
and is used primarily for the transport of 
equipment or goods but does not include a 
vehicle, 

(i) used for transportation solely within 
an employer's actual place of busi- 



(ii) used for farming operations but not 
used for carrying a load ; 

(c) "truck-trailer repairer" means a person en- 
gaged in the repair and maintenance of 
truck-trailers who, 

(i) disassembles, adjusts, repairs and re- 
assembles suspension systems, in- 
cluding bogies, axles, wheels, and 
rims, brake systems and electrical 
systems, 
(ii) inspects, repairs and realigns frames, 

(iii) inspects and repairs appurtenances 
such as tow-bars, hitches, turntables, 
landing gear and upper couplers, and 

(iv) inspects, tests, adjusts, overhauls 
and replaces truck-trailer refriger- 
ation system components, electrical 
circuits, pressure lines and fittings, 
and installs and removes truck- 
trailer refrigeration systems. O. 
Reg. 98/69, s. 1. 

2. The trade of truck-trailer repairer is designated 
as a certified trade for the purposes of the Act. O. 
Reg. 98/69, s. 2. 

3. An apprentice training program for the certi- 
fied trade is established and shall consist of, 

(a) training and instruction at full-time educa- 
tional day classes provided at a College of 
Applied Arts and Technology or in classes 
that, in the opinion of the Director, are 
equivalent thereto ; and 



{h) practical training and instruction provided 
by an employer of the apprentice, 

in the subjects contained in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Sche-' .. O. Reg. 98/69, s. 3. 

4. — ( 1 ) Subj ect to subsection 2 , an apprentice shall 
complete three periods of training and instruction of 
1800 hours per period. 

(2) Where the apprentice is the holder of an 
Ontario Secondary School Graduation Diploma or has 
Ontario Grade 12 standing in English, Mathematics 
and Science or has such other academic quaHfication 
that, in the opinion of the Director, is equivalent 
thereto, he shall complete three periods of training 
and instruction of 1600 hours per period. O. Reg. 
98/69, s. 4. 

5. Any person who, 

{a) applies in the prescribed form for apprentice- 
ship in the certified trade ; and 

(6) becomes an apprentice in the certified trade 
within three months after commencing to 
work in that trade, 

is exempt from subsection 2 of section 10 of the Act. 
O. Reg. 98/69, s. 5. 

6. The rate of wages for an apprentice in the certi- 
fied trade whether for his regular daily hours or for 
hours in excess of his regular hours shall not be 
less than, 

(a) 50 per cent during the first period of train- 
ing and instruction ; 

(6 ) 70 per cent during the second period of train- 
ing and instruction ; and 

(c) 90 per cent during the third period of train- 
ing and instruction, 

of the average rate of wages for journeymen employed 
by the employer in that trade or, where the employer 
is the only journeyman employed, of the average 
rate of wages for journeymen in the area. O. Reg. 
98/69, s. 6, revised. 

7. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
are the subjects set out in Parts 1 and 2 of the 
Schedule. O. Reg. 98/69, s. 7. 



Reg. 50 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



325 



Schedule 

TRUCK-TRAILER REPAIRER 

Part 1 

In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Mathematics 


Arithmetic 
Geometry 


Addition, subtraction and division of whole numbers 
and fractions, ratio, and proportion, areas and 
volumes. 

Lines, planes and angles. 


2 


Science 


Physics 
Mechanics 


Basic laws and principles, formulae. (Given as 
required in shop instruction.) 


3 


EngHsh 


Basic Usage and 

Business 

Communications 


Trade terminology and usage. Letter and report 
writing. Work and parts orders. Interpretation 
and use of manufacturers' manuals. 


4 


Drafting 


Basic Drafting and 
Interpretation 


Preparation of elementary working drawings and 
dimensioned sketches of automotive components. 
Interpretation of exploded drawings, electrical and 
hydraulic circuits and schematics used in manu- 
facturers' manuals. 


5' 


General Shop 
Practice 


Safety 
Hand Tools 

Power Tools 
Benchwork 


Safety rules and safe operating procedures. First 
aid. Fire prevention. Use and maintenance of 
fire-fighting equipment. Handling of gasoline, oils, 
paints, thinners and solvents. Danger of carbon 
monoxide fumes. Correct use of lifting and hoisting 
equipment. Good housekeeping. 

Selection and use of hammers, punches, chisels, 
pliers, wrenches, sockets, screwdrivers, hacksaws, 
files, drifts, scrapers, snips, clamps, vises, drill bits, 
reamers, taps and dies. Stud extractors. Hones. 
Care and use of wood-working tools — saws, planes, 
mallets, chisels, wood drill bits, rasps. 
Care and use of body-working tools — hammers, 
dollies, picks, panel cutters, body-files. Paint 
brushes, spray guns. 

Care and use of portable air and electric drills, screw- 
drivers, grinders, disc sanders, orbital sanders, belt 
Sanders, impact tools, nibblers, skil-saws. 

Cutting with hacksaw, filing, scraping, drilling wood 
and metal ; use of drill press. Use of bench grinder ; 
grinding drill bits, chisels. Fitting bushings, honing, 
cutting and flaring tubing. Soldering, gasket 
making. Oxy-acetylene and arc welding and cutting. 
Brazing techniques. Care and maintenance of welding 
equipment. 



326 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 50 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Measuring 
Instruments 



Fastening Devices 



General Shop 
Equipment 



Use of rules, straight edges, squares, feeler gauges, 
calipers, verniers, micrometers, telescopic gauges, 
dial indicators, pressure gauges, trammel gauges. 

Types of bolts, nuts, studs, screws and tube fittings. 
Thread identification and classification. Tensile 
strenghts. Installation procedures. Tightening 
torques. Cutting internal and external threads. 
Removing broken studs. "Heli-Coil" inserts. Types 
of rivets, keys, springs, flat and lock washers, snap 
rings, circlips, cotter pins. Installation and removal. 
Thread lubricants, sealers and locking compounds. 

Capacities and correct usage of floor cranes, hoists, 
jacks, stands, pullers, hydraulic presses, power hack- 
saws; circular and cut-off saws, handsaws, jointers 
and planers. Lumber selection and storage. Sawing, 
ripping, planing, jointing, shiplapping. Mainte- 
nance of equipment. Operation and maintenance of 
steamcleaning and degreasing equipment and air 
compressors. 



Truck-Trailer 

Suspension 

Systems 



Suspensions 



Trailer Axles 



Axle Bearings 



Wheels and Rims 



Tires and Tubes 



Types and characteristics. Leaf-spring, torsion bar, 
rubber and air cushion; single, tandem and multi- 
axle. Hangers and suspension control rods, articu- 
lated torque beams, compensators, trunnion pivots. 
Tramming suspension mountings. Overhauling sus- 
pensions and related components. Assembly re- 
ahgnment. Removing and installing compressed 
springs and related parts. Replacing bushings; 
maintaining preloading. Removing and installing 
torsion bars. Torquing suspension components. 
Lubrication. Handling heavy preloaded com- 
ponents. 

Types and characteristics. Semi and full load 
bearing trailers. Towbars, hitches and turn-tables. 
Landing gear. Inspection. Effects of misalign- 
ment, incorrect tire sizes and pressures on trailer 
operation. Removing, overhauling and installing 
axles and related components; towbars, hitches, 
turn-tables and landing gear. Hazards involved. 

Types and characteristics. Removing, relubing, 
replacing, adjusting or torquing. Characteristics of 
oil seals. Replacement methods. 
Types and characteristics. Single and duals. Wheel 
and rim removal and installation. Wheel wrenches. 
Handling heavy wheel and tire assemblies. Wheel 
to hub fastening and locating devices. Inspecting 
and servicing wheels and rims. Permissible run-out. 

Types, characteristics; size and application. De- 
mounting and mounting. Equipment and lubricants 
used. Repair of tires, tubes and valves. Tire in- 



Reg. 50 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



327 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 








flation precautions. Inspection; identification of 
tire wear, damage and faults; effects of misalign- 
ment. Tire rotation. Retreaded tires. 


7 


Truck-Trailer 
Frames 


Standard Trailer 
Frames 

Unitized 
Construction 


Types, construction, materials and characteristics of 
semi-trailer and trailer frames. Effects of damaged 
frames. Inspection. Measuring tools and equip- 
ment; straightening and alignment equipment. 
Frame realignment methods and hook-ups. Cross- 
member replacement techniques. Methods of rivet- 
ting, welding and bolting frame members. Re- 
inforcement and bracing. Removal and installation 
of 5th wheel pin. Heat straightening frame mem- 
bers. Effects of improper repair or modification of 
frames. Hazards of improper use of equipment. 

Types and characteristics of unitized body-frames 
and suspension mountings. Unitized frame damage. 
Inspection. Measuring tools and equipment. Effects 
of underbody damage on tractor-trailer operation. 
Use of straightening and ahgnment equipment. 
Replacement and realignment of underbody sec- 
tions. Heat straightening. Sealing, painting and 
insulating after repairs. 


8 


Truck-Trailer 
Brake Systems 


Trailer Brakes 


Types, function and principles of brake actuating 
devices and brake operating systems; vacuum sus- 
pended, air, air-hydraulic, electric. Operation of 
system components; air compressors, reservoirs; 
emergency relay valves, treadle controls, limiting 
quick release valves, 2-way valves, tractor protection 
valves, checkvalves, low pressure indicators, flexible 
hoses and fittings. Operation of brake assemblies; 
brake chambers(piston and diaphragm), slack ad- 
justers, brake shoes and linings, combination linings, 
anchor pins, camshafts and rollers, actuating wedges. 
Effects of defective trailer brakes. Inspection, over- 
haul, reassembly, adjustment and testing of brake 
assemblies and systems. Servicing intervals. Check- 
ing for external leaks. Reassembly lubrication. 
Relining brake shoes. Reconditioning brake 
drums. 


9 


Truck-Trailer 

Electrical 

Systems 


Basic Electricity 

Truck-Trailer 
Electrical Circuits 


Definition of amperes, voltage, resistance, Ohm's 
Law. Electron flow. Electro-magnetism. Typical 
series and parallel circuits. Voltage drop. Use of 
voltmeter, ammeter and ohmmeter. Conductors and 
insulators. Ground circuits. 

Automotive wire and cables. Insulation materials. 
Joining, spHcing and soldering of wires and cables. 
Removal and installation of terminals, connectors 
and plugs. Effects of temperature, shorts, grounds, 
poor connections, etc. Resistances and fuses. 
Identification, tracing and testing of circuits. 



328 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 50 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



Lights 



Batteries 



Commercial vehicle lighting regulations. Charac- 
teristics of lights. Type and rating of bulbs. Candle 
power and wattage. Lenses and holders. Signal 
lights ; flasher units. Vapour-proof lights. Replace- 
ment procedures. 

Characteristics and function of lead acid batteries. 
Inspecting and testing. Use of voltmeters, am- 
meters, load resistances and hydrometers. Battery 
charging. Charging equipment. Charging and 
handling hazards. 



10 



Truck-Trailer 
Body Repair 
(Basic) 



General Construction 

Platform Bodies 
Stake Bodies 

Vans 



Dump Boxes 



Tankers and 
Bulk Carriers 



Priming and Touch-up 



Types, construction, materials and characteristics of 
truck-trailer bodies; platform, stake, van, dump, 
tanker and bulk carrier. 

Repairs to front bulkhead and floors. 

Replacement of stakes. Repairs to racks. Replace- 
ment of hinges and latches. Floor repairs. Repairs 
to ridge-poles. Minor tarp repairs. 

Removal and replacement of exterior mouldings and 
trim. Panel repairs ; patching methods ; use of sheet 
metal screws or "blind" rivetting. "Cold-fiUing" 
damaged panel areas; filler materials, hardeners, 
apphcation and finishing. Panel replacement; cut- 
ting, forming and installation. Repair or replace- 
ment of pillars and rails; square tube and top-hat 
sections. Repair or replacement of door hinges, 
bolts and locking assemblies. Rehanging and adjust- 
ing doors. Replacing weather-stripping, insulation 
and lining panels. Floor repairs. 

Repair and reinforcement of bodies and tail gates. 
Repair or replacement of tail gate hinges, locking 
and spreader mechanisms. 
Servicing and overhaul of hydraulic dumping gear. 

Hazards involved in "hot" welding repairs to tankers 
or bulk carriers used for flammable, explosive, 
poisonous or corrosive liquids and materials. Re- 
pairs to be made by authorized personnel only, 
where cleaning facilities and test equipment are 
available. 

Priming and touch-up procedures for repaired areas. 



11 



Truck-Trailer 
Refrigeration 
Equipment 



Refrigeration 
Principles 



Heat transfer; conduction, convection, radiation. 
British thermal units. Latent heat of vaporization; 
effects of liquid change to vapor and vapor to liquid. 
Effects of pressure on boihng point and condensation. 
Refrigerant. The basic refrigeration system. Air 
induction and condensation removal systems. 



Reg. 50 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



329 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 






System Components 

Inspection and 
Maintenance 


Types, characteristics and operation. Drive units, 
compressors and clutcli drives, condensers, receivers, 
expansion valves, evaporators, control valves, ther- 
mostatic controls, blowers, electrical circuits. 
Refrigerant (Freon — 12), refrigeration oils, pressure 
lines and fittings. 

Safety precautions and correct use of safety equip- 
ment. 

Inspection, testing, adjustment, overhaul and re- 
placement procedures. Use of gauges and test 
equipment. Importance of exercising systems. Oil 
level checks and replenishment procedures. Testing 
for leaks. Purging, evacuating and recharging pro- 
cedures. Procedures for installation and removal of 
truck-*railer refrigeration systems. 



Part 2 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


General Shop 
Practice 


General 


Safety rules and removal of all safety hazards. 
Use of hand and power tools, measuring instruments, 
fastening devices and general shop equipment. 
Benchwork operations. Lumber selection and stor- 
age ; sawing and machining. 
(As detailed in Part 1.) 


2 


Truck-Trailer 

Suspension 

Systems 


Suspensions 

Trailer Axles 
Axle Bearings 


Leaf spring, torsion bar, rubber and air cushion 
types ; single, tandem and multi-axle. Inspection and 
servicing. Disassembly, overhaul and reassembly 
of suspension systems and related components. 
Torquing and realignment. Tramming dimensions. 
Lubrication. 

Trailer axles, towbars, hitches, turn-tables, landing 
gear. Inspection and servicing. Disassembly, over- 
haul and reassembly. Lubrication. 

Removal, inspection, relubing or replacing, adjusting 
or torquing. Oil seal replacement. 



330 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 50 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Wheels and Rims 

Tires, Tubes and 
Valves 


Inspection and servicing. Removal and installation. 
Checking run-out. 

Inspection. Identification of tire wear, damage and 
faults. Demounting and mounting tires. Inflation 
precautions. Repairs. Tire rotation. 


3 


Truck-Trailer 
Frames 


Standard Trailer 
Frames 

Unitized Construction 


Inspection. Frame straightening and alignment. 
Cross member replacement. Ri vetted, welded and 
bolted repairs to frames. Reinforcing and bracing 
frames. Heat straightening. Replacement of 5th 
wheel pins. 

Inspection. Straightening and alignment. Replace- 
ment and realignment of underbody sections. Heat 
straightening; sealing, insulating and painting after 
repairs. 


4 


Truck-Trailer 
Brake Systems 


Trailer Brakes 


Vacuum suspended, air, air-hydraulic, electric, 
operated systems. Inspection and servicing. Over- 
haul, repair or replacement of brake systems and 
assemblies; brake chambers, slack adjusters, brake 
shoes and linings, anchor pins, camshafts and rollers, 
wedges, flexible hoses and fittings. Rehning brake 
shoes and reconditioning brake drums. Adjusting 
and testing systems. 


5 


Truck-Trailer 

Electrical 

Systems 


Electrical Circuits 
and Lights 

Batteries 


Identification, tracing and testing of trailer circuits. 
Replacing lights, bulbs, wiring, terminals, connectors 
and plugs. 

Inspection — testing and charging. Charging haz- 
ards. 


6 


Truck-Trailer 
Body Repair 
(Basic) 


Platform Bodies 
Stake Bodies 

Vans 

Dump Boxes 
Priming and Touch-up 


Repairs to front bulkhead and floor, etc. 

Replacement of stakes; repairs to racks. Replace- 
ment of hinges and latches. Floor repairs. Repairs 
to ridge poles. Minor tarp repairs. 

Removal and replacement of mouldings and trim. 
Panel repairs; patching and "cold-filhng" of damaged 
areas. Panel replacement. Repair or replacement 
of pillars or rails. Repair or replacement of door 
hinges, bolts and locking assemblies. Door re- 
hanging and adjustment. Replacing weather- 
stripping, insulation and lining panels. Floor repairs. 

Repair and reinforcement of boxes and tailgates. 
Repair or replacement of tailgate hinges, locking and 
spreader mechanisms. Servicing and overhaul of 
hydraulic dumping gear. 

Priming and touch-up of repaired areas. 



Reg. 50 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



331 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 






Tankers and Bulk 
Carriers 


Hazards involved in "hot "welding repairs. Repairs 
to be made by authorized personnel only, where 
cleaning facilities and test equipment are available. 


7 


Truck-Trailer 
Refrigeration 
Equipment 


Inspection and 
Maintenance 


Familiarization with safety precautions and use of 
safety equipment. Inspection, testing, adjustment, 
overhaul or replacement of drive units, compressors 
and clutch drives, condensers, receivers, expansion 
valves, evaporators, control valves, thermostatic 
controls, blowers, electrical circuits, pressure hues 
and fittings, refrigerant. Oil level checks and re- 
plenishment. Purging, evacuating and recharging 
operations. Installation and removal of truck- 
trailer refrigeration systems. 



O. Reg. 98/69, Sched. 



332 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 51 



REGULATION 51 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



WATCH REPAIRERS 

1. In this Regulation, 

[a) "certified trade" means the trade of watch 
repairer ; 

{b) "watch repairer" means a person who, 

(i) makes or fits parts for time-pieces, 

(ii) repairs, alters, takes apart, assem- 
bles or reassembles time-pieces or 
any part thereof, 

(iii) determines the condition of time- 
pieces and estimates the repairs 
necessary, 

(iv) cleans, polishes or lubricates time- 
piece movements or any part there- 
of, or 

(v) tests, adjusts or regulates time- 
pieces or any part thereof. O. Reg. 
130/70, s.l. 

2. The trade of watch repairer is designated 
as a certified trade for the purposes of the Act. 
O. Reg. 130/70, s. 2. 

3. — (1) An apprentice training program for the 
certified trade is established and shall consist of, 

(a) training and instruction at full-time edu- 
cational day classes provided at a College 
of Applied Arts and Technology or in 
courses that, in the opinion of the Director, 
are equivalent thereto, in the subjects con- 
tained in Schedule 1 ; and 

(6) practical training and instruction provided 
by the employer of the apprentice in the 
subjects contained in Schedule 2. 

(2) An apprentice shall complete three periods of 
training and instruction of 1,800 hours per period. 
O. Reg. 130/70, s. 3. 

4. — (1) The graduate of a course in which the 
candidate is required to attend full-time educational 
day classes provided at a College of Applied Arts and 
Technology for a period of three years or courses that, 
in the opinion of the Director, are equivalent thereto, 
may be excused from complying with the provisions 
of section 3 and upon passing the examination re- 
ferred to in section 6 shall be granted a certificate of 
qualification. 



(2) The graduate of a course in which the candi- 
date is required to attend full-time educational day 
classes provided at a College of Applied Arts and 
Technology for a period of two years or courses that, 
in the opinion of the Director, are equivalent there- 
to, may be enrolled as an apprentice and upon enrol- 
ment shall complete one period of training and 
instruction and may be excused from all or such 
part of the training and instruction referred to in 
clause a of subsection 1 of section 3 as the Director 
prescribes. 

(3) A person who has completed a portion of a 
course in which he is required to attend full-time 
educational day classes provided at a College of 
Applied Arts and Technology for a period less than 
two years or courses that, in the opinion of the 
Director, are equivalent thereto, may be enrolled as 
an apprentice and upon enrolment shall complete 
such training and instruction as the Director pre- 
scribes. O. Reg. 130/70, s. 4. 

5. The hourly rate of wages for an apprentice in 
the certified trade whether for his regular daily 
hours or for hours in excess of his regular daily 
hours shall not be less than, 

(a) 40 per cent during the first period of training 
and instruction ; 

(b) 60 per cent during the second period of 
training and instruction ; and 

(c) 80 per cent during the third period of 
training and instruction, 

of the average hourly rate of wages for journey- 
men employed by the employer in the trade or, 
where the employer is the only journeyman em- 
ployed, of the average hourly rate of wages for 
journeymen in the area. O. Reg. 130/70, s. 5. 



6. The subjects of examination for a certificate of 
qualification are the subjects contained in schedules 
1 and 2. O. Reg. 130/70, s. 6. 

7. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the certified trade shall not 
exceed, 



(a) where the employer is a journeyman in the 
certified trade, two apprentices plus an 
additional two apprentices for every jour- 
neyman employed in the certified trade 
and with whom the apprentices are working ; 
and 



Reg. 51 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



333 



{b) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the certified trade, two apprentices for 
every journeyman employed by the em- 
ployer in the certified trade and with whom 



the apprentices are working. O. Reg. 
130/70, s. 7. 
8. A certificate of qualification expires with the 
30th day of June in each year. O. Reg. 130/70, s. 8. 



Schedule 1 

WATCH REPAIRER 
In-School Training 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


1 


Mathematics 
(Trade Related) 


Arithmetic 

Business Mathematics 

Geometry 


Addition, subtraction, multiplication, division. 
Fractions, decimals, percentage, interest and dis- 
count. 

Fundamental operations. Basic bookkeeping, balance 
sheets, financial statements. Retailing, insurance, 
taxes, licensing, leases. 

Lines, planes and angles. 


2 


Language and 
Communication 


Composition 

Basic Usage and 

Business 

Communications 


Grammar, sentence and paragraph structure. 
Written and oral composition. 

Trade terminology and usage. Letter and report 
writing. Work and parts orders; interpretation and 
use of manufacturers' parts catalogues. 


3 


Science 


Physics 


Basic laws and principles, formulae. (Given as 
required in shop instruction) 


4 


General Shop 
Practice 


Safety 
Hand Tools 

Power Tools 

Measuring 
Instruments 

Shop Equipment 


Safety rules and safe operating procedures. First aid. 
Fire prevention. Use and maintenance of fire-fighting 
equipment. Handhng and storage of acids, oils, 
cleaning solvents and toxic materials. Good 
housekeeping. 

Care and use of general purpose and hairspring 
tweezers, general purpose and jewel screwdrivers, 
smooth or knurled-jaw phers and cutters, loupes; 
staking, jewelHng and poising tools, non-magnetic 
tweezers, files, gravers, drills, taps and dies. Tool 
sharpening and dressing procedures. 

Care, use and maintenance of watchmaker's lathes; 
cutting tools, accessories, polishing and grinding 
laps. 

Care and use of micrometers, vernier gauges, trueing 
calipers. 

Care, use and maintenance of agitator and ultra-sonic 
cleaning machines. Drill presses and attachments. 
Demagnetizers. Microscopes. Crystal fitting ma- 
chines. Timing and electronic test equipment. 
Waterproof watch case-openers and test equipment. 



334 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 51 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 


5 


Watch and Clock 
Theory 


Principles and Design 


Watch and clock history. Principles of watch 
mechanical designs ; winding and setting mechanisms 
and main springs, including self-winding types ; gear 
trains, escapements, balance wheels and hairsprings, 
jewelled and plain bearings, plates and bridges. 
Principles and designs of electric and electronic 
watches. Principles and designs of clock movements. 






Construction and 
Operation 


Types and characteristics; cases, dials, movements, 
crystals, crowns, and hands. Waterproof, non-water- 
proof, self-winding, calendar, chronograph, electric 
and electronic types. 


6 


Watch Repair 
Practice 


Dismantling 


Identification of watch type, required tools and 
dismanthng sequence. Care and precautions. Stem 
and crystal removal procedures for all types. Re- 
moval procedures for hands and dial, automatic 
winding assembUes, balance and escapement assem- 
bhes, barrel and train assembhes. Chronographs, 
electric and electronic types. Reference to manu- 
facturers' specifications. 






Malfunctions 


Identification and recognition of faults; required 
adjustments, worn, loose, damaged, broken, poorly 
fitted or incorrect parts, rust, foreign matter, in- 
sufficient or over-lubrication. 






Parts Replacement 


Identification and knowledge of interchangeability of 
parts and components by use of part numbers and 
parts catalogues for: balance staff, stem and crown, 
main spring, escapement assembly, jewels, gear 
trains, electronic assembly, dial, hands and crystal, 
power unit, calendar unit and dial train. Repair kits. 






Lathe Work 


Watchmakers' lathe set-up and operation. Grinding 

and cutting tools. Procedures and techniques for 
parts alterations and polishing. Removal and fitting 
of balance staff. Stem alterations. Parts fitting 
techniques ; tolerances and adjustments. 






Parts Fitting 


Tool selection, techniques and procedures for drilling- 
out broken screws and case lugs. Reaming plates, 
bushings and hands. Staking balance staff, roller 
and hairspring to the balance ; staking staff to pallets, 
staking jewels. Shellacking roller and pallet jewels. 
Polishing and burnishing pivots. 






Crystals 


Techniques and procedures for grinding, fihng and 
fitting round or fancy glass or unbreakable crystals. 
Use of cements or sealants for waterproof types. 






Cleaning Operations 
(Movements) 


Procedures and techniques for machine and ultra- 
sonic cleaning. Cleaning solvent types and cleaning 
durations. Rinsing; solvent effects of rinses on 



Reg. 51 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



335 



Item 



Column 1 



Column 2 



Column 3 



Course 



Subject 



Instruction To Be Given 



(Dials) 



(Cases) 



Lubrication 



Preassembly 
Adjustments 

Watch Reassembly 



Watch Adjustment 



Regulation 



Waterproofing 



jewel shellac; care and precautions to be taken. 
Drying procedures; precautions against overheating. 
Use of peg and pith wood. 

Recognition of dial type and applicable cleaning 
technique; brushing, light wiping, art gum use and 
dipping methods. 

Cleaning by buffing, polishing and burnishing 
operations. Ultrasonic cleaning methods. Use of 
cleaning solutions. 

Watch lubricant types. Oiler types, lubrication 
points and techniques; precision application and 
amount, progressive reassembly and final assembly 
lubrication. 

Techniques and procedures for trueing and poising 
balance and polishing pivots. 

Techniques, tools and required assembly sequence 
and operations. Testing and checking parts function- 
ing during assembly. Assembly and final lubrication. 
Importance of finished appearance of dial, hands and 
case. 

Techniques for balance assembly adjustment. True- 
ing hairsprings in the flat and in the round. Trueing 
regulator pins. Escapement assembly; pallet ad- 
justment techniques. Run, lockslide and safety 
roller action. Use of specialized test equipment for 
electric and electronic watches. Adjustment techni- 
ques for hands, dial and movement to case. 

Checking by timing in shop. Use of electric timing 
machine to measure errors in rate, position, beat and 
magnetism. Adjustment techniques for position 
regulator, timing screws, regulator pins, hairspring 
length. Electronic watch regulation techniques 
phasing, positioning of tuning-fork regulators. Use 
of manufacturers' specifications. 

Recognition of snap, screw-back and one-piece type 
waterproof cases. Inspection procedures for fit of 
crystal to case, fit of crown and pendant, condition of 
gasket and fit of back to case. Reassembly techni- 
ques and use of correct casing tools. Application of 
silicone grease. Use of immersion test equipment for 
tightness and pressure. 



Clock Repair 
Practice 



Adjustments 



Recognition of clock types and malfunctions: Pro- 
cedures and techniques to set-up and adjust; 
pendulum, alarm, strike and chime types. 



Estimating 



Procedure 



Inspection and recognition of malfunction ; economics 
of repairs. Listing parts or components for replace- 



336 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 51 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Instruction To Be Given 








ment by .name and part number. Estimating labour 
costs — based on current or association rates. 
Handling costs and overheads. Profit mark-up. 
Validity of repairs and guarantees. Customer 
relations. 



O. Reg. 130/70, Sched. 1 



Schedule 2 

WATCH REPAIRER 
Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


1 


General Shop 
Practice 


General 


Safety rules and removal of all safety hazards. 
Use of hand and power tools, measuring instruments 
and shop equipment. (As detailed in Schedule 1). 


2 


Watch and Clock 
Theory 


Principles and Design 

Construction and 
Operation 


Familiarization with principles of watch mechanical 

designs ; winding and setting mechanisms and main- 
springs, including self-winding types; gear trains, 
escapements, balance wheels and hairsprings, jewelled 
and plain bearings, plates and bridges. Principles 
and designs of electric and electronic watches. 
Principles and designs of clock movements. 

Famiharization with construction types and char- 
acteristics: cases, dials, movements, crystals, 
crowns and hands. Waterproof, non-waterproof, 
self-winding calendar, chronograph, electric and 
electronic types. 


3 


Watch Repair 
Practice 


Crystals 

Cases 
Dismantling 

Malfunctions 


Fitting round or fancy glass or unbreakable types. 
Cementing and sealing. 

Cleaning, buffing and polishing operations. 

Familiarization with watch type, dismanthng se- 
quence and precautions. Removing stems and 
crystals, hands and dials, automatic winding assem- 
blies, balance and escapement assemblies, barrel and 
train assemblies. 

Recognition of faults and economics of required 
action. Use of part numbers and parts catalogues 
for part and component identification and inter- 
changeability. 



Reg. 51 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



337 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Column 3 


Course 


Subject 


Work Instruction and Experience 


• 




Lathe Work 
Cleaning Operations 

Parts Fitting 

Reassembly and 
Adjustments 

Regulation 
Waterproofing 


Set-up and operation. Turning and polishing. 
Parts alterations, fitting and adjustments. 

Cleaning movements by machine or ultrasonic 
methods. Rinsing and drying operations. Cleaning 
dials by applicable method. 

Drilhng, reaming, staking, shellacking, polishing and 
burnishing operations. 

Assembly operations up to, and including train. 
Checking parts functioning during assembly. Fitting 
mainspring, crown and stem. Assembly lubrication. 
Assembly of escapement and pallet adjustment. 
Assembly of balance (Conventional types). Trueing 
and adjusting hair-spring. Installation of automatic 
(self-winding) action. Final lubrication. Fitting 
dial and hands. Synchronizing day-date dials. 
Reassembly of electric watches with conventional 
balance assemblies and electronic types with tuning- 
fork regulation, according to manufacturers' speci- 
fications. Recasing. 

Checking and adjusting errors in rate, position, 
beat and magnetism in conventional movements. 
Phasing and positioning tuning-fork regulators in 
electronic types. 

Checking fit of case components and gaskets. Re- 
assembly and silicone grease application as re- 
quired. Immersion testing. 


4 


Clock Repair 
Practice 


Adjustments 


Determining and correcting malfunction. Setting-up 
and adjusting; pendulum, alarm, strike and chime 
type clocks. 


5 


Estimating 


Estimate Preparation 


Determining required action, necessary parts, labour 
costs, overhead and profit mark-up. Use of current 
or association rate guides. Guaranteeing work- 
manship. 



O. Reg. 130/70, Sched. 2. 



338 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION 



Reg. 52 



REGULATION 52 

under The Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Act 



WORKERS IN SERVICING AND 

INSTALLING AIR-CONDITIONING OR 

REFRIGERATING EQUIPMENT 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "certified trade" means the trade of worker 
in servicing and installing air-conditioning 
or refrigerating equipment ; 

(6) "worker in servicing and installing air- 
conditioning or refrigerating equipment" 
means a person who, 

(i) installs or assembles any component 
of a refrigerating or air-conditioning 
system, 

(ii) assembles or connects any pipe or 
duct used in piping brine or con- 
ditioned air, 

(iii) overhauls or repairs any equipment 
used in refrigerating or air-con- 
ditioning systems, or 

(iv) tests, adjusts, or instructs in the 
operation of refrigerating or air- 
conditioning systems, 

but does not include a person who repairs 
or installs hermetically sealed units made 
for refrigerators in domestic use. O. Reg. 
266/64, s. 1. 

2. The trade of worker in servicing and in- 
staUing air-conditioning or refrigerating equipment 
is designated as a certified trade for the purposes 
of the Act. O. Reg. 266/64, s. 2. 

3. An apprentice training program is established 
for the certified trade and shall consist of five periods 
of training and instruction of 1800 hours each, 

(a) at full-time educational day classes pro- 
vided at a College of Applied Arts and 
Technology ; and 



{b) in practical training and instruction pro- 
vided by an employer of the apprentice, 

in the courses contained in the Schedule. O. Reg. 
266/64, s. 3, revised. 

4. Any person who, 

(a) applies in the prescribed form for appren- 
ticeship in the certified trade; and 

(6) becomes an apprentice in the certified 
trade within three months after com- 
mencing to work in that trade, 

is exempt from subsection 2 of section 10 of the 
Act. O. Reg. 266/64, s. 4. 



5. The subjects of examination for an apprentice 
in the certified trade are the subjects set out in 
column 1 of the Schedule. O. Reg. 266/64, s. 5. 

6. The number of apprentices who may be em- 
ployed by an employer in the certified trade shall 
not exceed, 

(a) where the employer is a journeyman in 
the trade, one apprentice plus an addi- 
tional apprentice for each five journeymen 
employed by that employer in the trade 
and with whom the apprentice is working; 
and 

(b) where the employer is not a journeyman in 
the trade, one apprentice for the first 
journeyman employed by the employer 
plus an additional apprentice for each 
additional five journeymen employed by 
that employer in the trade and with whom 
the apprentice is working. O. Reg. 266/64, 
S.6. 



7. A certificate of quahfication expires with the 
30th day of June in each year. O. Reg. 266/64, 

S.7. 



Reg. 52 



APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN S QUALIFICATION 



339 



Schedule 

In-School Training and Work Instruction and Experience 



Item 


Column 1 


Column 2 


Subject 


Instructions to be given 


1 


Trade orientation 


Scope of work. Knowledge required. Practical skills. 


2 


Tools of trade 


Application and use of, 
(a) hand tools; 
(h) power tools; 

(c) testing instruments ; 

(d) hoists, slings, and rollers ; 

{e) welding and brazing outfits ; and 
ij) leak detectors. 


3 


Basic principles 


Refrigerant cycles and mechanical applications. Flow and 
measurement of heat. Refrigerants and pressure-tem- 
perature relationship. Interpreting piping and control 
diagrams, plans and specifications. 


4 


Refrigeration systems 


Low temperature food warehouses — long term storage. 
High temperature, short term food storage. Chain store 
applications. Packaged equipment. Industrial applications: 
dairies, breweries, meat packing plants. Skating and 
ending rinks. Test facilities and special equipment. 
Pumping systems. 


5 


Air conditioning 


Definition of term. Properties of air. Movement and con- 
ditioning of air. Layout of duct systems. Types of equip- 
ment. Operation of controls, systems and safety devices. 
Pumping systems. Application requirements. Noise levels. 
Optimum temperatures. 


6 


Equipment installation 


Preparation of foundations and mountings for compressor, 
evaporators, condensers and other components. Alignment 
procedures, belt and direct drive. Pipe work, steel and 
copper. Control systems. Safety controls. Duct work 
systems — checkout and balancing. Checkout on electrical 
and water systems. Evacuation, charging and testing. 
Start-up and adjusting. Knowledge of pipe and duct 
installation. 


7 


Servicing 


Trouble shooting techniques. Maintenance procedures. 
Start-up and shut-down procedures. Checking of operating 
and safety controls. Leak detection and repair. Water 
treatment procedures. Overhauhng and repairing of equip- 
ment. System cleanout procedures. 


8 


Safety considerations 


Pressure testing, pressures and gases used. Pressure 
relief devices. Safety controls. Guards for belts and 
couplings. Filter cleaning. HandUng of acetylene and 
oxygen equipment. Ladders, hoists and scaffolding. Hand 
and power tools. Extension cords and air hues. Flam- 
mable and toxic refrigerants. Fire precautions. Codes 
and regulations. 



O. Reg. 266/64, Sched. 



Reg. 53 



ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORIC SITES PROTECTION 



341 



REGULATION 53 

under The Archaeological and Historic Sites Protection Act 



ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES 

1. The lands described in each Schedule are des- 
ignated as an archaeological site. R.R.O. 1960, 
Reg. 27. s. 1. 

Schedule 1 

FORGET ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE 

That part of Lot 91 in the First Concession of the 
Township of Tay in the County of Simcoe, lying 
westerly of a hne that is parallel to and distant 
easterly 192 rods and 12 feet measured at right 
angles from the said westerly limit; but excepting 
thereout the parcel at the southeast corner of that 
part of the above-described parcel lying north of 
and fronting 24 rods on the township road across the 
said lot, as described in an instrument registered 
in the registry office for the Registry Division of 
Simcoe as No. 18260; and further excepting the said 
township road. R.R.O. 1%0. Reg. 27. Sched. 1. 
revised. 

Schedule 2 

THE SHEGUIANDAH ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE 

1. In the Township of Rowland and the Town- 
plot of Sheguiandah, in the Territorial District of 
Manitouhn, being, 

(a) part of, 

(i) Lot 1 in Concession I, and 
(ii) Lot 1 in Concession XI, 
in the Township of Howland ; and 

(b) (i) park lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 on the 

north side of Campbell Street, and 

(ii) lots 15 to 24, both inclusive, on the 
south side of CampbeU Street, and 

(iii) parts of park lots 7 and 8 on the 
south side of Campbell Street, and 

(iv) part of Mill Site No. Ill, and 

(v) parts of Vankoughnet Street, Camp- 
bell Street and Tekumah Street. 

in the Townplot of Sheguiandah, containing 85.88 
acres, more or less; and, premising that all bearings 
are astronomical and derived from observations of 
Polaris, described as follows: 



Firstly: 

Part of Lot 1 in the 1st Concession of the Town- 
ship of Howland containing 11.06 acres, more or 
less; beginning at a point in the easterly hmit 
of Lot 1, distant 1025.0 feet, measured north 0° 26' 
west from the southeast angle of the said Lot 1 ; 
thence south 89° 56' west, 672.25 feet to a survey 
post planted; thence south 0° 26' east, 1025.0 feet 
to the south limit .of the said Lot 1 ; thence north 
89° 56' east along the south hmit of the lot, 90.0 
feet to the line of a post and wire fence defining 
the northwesterly limit of a travelled road crossing 
the southeasterly portion of the lot ; thence north 
72° 23' east following the hne of fence 24.9 feet 
to a bend in the same ; thence continuing along the 
line of the fence defining the northwesterly limit 
of the travelled road on a general bearing of north 
29° 22' east, 507.75 feet to an angle in the same; 
thence still along the line of fence on a general 
bearing of north 75° 57' east, 292.0 feet to a bend 
in the fence; thence continuing along the line of 
fence on a general bearing of north 49° 47' east, 
29.0 feet, more or less, to the east hmit of the said 
Lot 1 ; thence north 0° 26' west along the last- 
mentioned limit, 486.0 feet to the place of beginning. 

Secondly: 

Part of Lot 1 in the 1st Concession and part of Lot 
1 in the 11th Concession of the Township of How- 
land and part of the Townplot of Sheguiandah, 
containing 74.82 acres, more or less; beginning at 
the northwest angle of Park Lot 1 on the north 
side of Campbell Street in the Townplot of Shegui- 
andah; thence south 0° 26' east along the west 
hmit of the said Park lot, 180.67 feet; thence south 
78°30' west, 297.25 feet; thence south 50° 58' west, 
107.24 feet; thence south 28° 00' west, 474.8 feet, 
more or less, to the north hmit of Lot 16 on the 
south side of Campbell Street in the Townplot; 
thence south 89° 56' west along the north limits of 
Lot 16 and Lot 15 on the south side of Campbell 
Street, 136.65 feet, more or less, to a survey post 
defining the northwest angle of the said Lot 15; 
thence south along the west limit of the said Lot 15, 
a distance of 165.0 feet to a survey post marking the 
southwest angle of the said Lot 15; thence north 
89° 56' east along the south hmits of lots 15, 16, 17 
and 18 on the south side of Campbell Street, 527.1 
feet to a survey post defining the southeast angle of 
Lot 18; thence southerly in a straight hne, 202.5 
feet more or less, to the intersection of the northerly 
hmit of Robert Street with the east limit of Hill 
Street according to a plan registered in the Registry 
Office for the Registry Division of Manitouhn as 
No. 7 ; thence south 0° 22' west along the east 
hmit of Hill Street, 52.8 feet, more or less, to the 
line of a post and wire fence; thence in an easterly 



342 



ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORIC SITES PROTECTION 



Reg. 53 



direction following the line of the post and wire 
fence, having a general bearing of north 88° 12' 
east, 688.55 feet, more or less, to the east limit of 
Mill Site No. Ill in the Townplot of Sheguiandah; 
thence north along the east hmit of Mill Site 
No. Ill 234.2 feet to a survey post defining the 
northwest angle of Lot 1 on the west side of Teku- 
mah Street in the said Townplot of Sheguiandah; 
thence north 89° 56' east along the north hmit of 
Lot 1 and its production a distance of 230.7 feet, 
more or less, to the east hmit of Tekumah Street, 
aforesaid ; thence south along the east hmit of Teku- 
mah Street, 478.5 feet, more or less, to the north 
limit of a road 66 feet in perpendicular width con- 
veyed to the MunicipaUty of Rowland by instrument 
No. 109 registered in the Registry Office for the 
Registry Division of Manitoulin; thence east along 
the north Hmit of that road 145.65 feet to a bend in 
same ; thence north 64° 30' east continuing along the 
northerly hmit of that road 315 feet, more or less, to 
the intersection with the southeasterly hmit of Park 
Lot 7 on the south side of Campbell Street in the 
Townplot of Sheguiandah ; thence in a general north- 
easterly direction following the southeasterly hmits 
of Park Lot 7, and Park Lot 8 on the south 
side of Campbell Street, to a survey post planted on 
the southerly production of the easterly limit of 
Park Lot 6 on the north side of Campbell Street 
in the Townplot of Sheguiandah ; thence north 0° 26' 
west along the production of the east limit of Park 
Lot 6, a distance of 110.4 feet to a survey post 
planted in the southerly limit of Campbell Street ; 
thence north 0° 26' west, continuing along the pro- 
duction 66.0 feet to the southeast angle of Park 
Lot 6; thence north 0° 26' west, along the east 
Hmit of Park Lot 6 and its production northerly a 
distance of 1025.0 feet to a survey post planted; 
thence south 89° 56' west, 1963.0 feet, more or less, 
to a survey post planted in the west limit of Lot 1 
in Concession XI of the Township of Rowland; 
thence south 0° 26' east along the last-mentioned 
Hmit 365.0 feet to the place of beginning. R.R.O. 
1960, Reg. 27, Sched. 2, revised. 



Schedule 3 

TOWNSHIP OF SOUTH BURLEIGH 
ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE 

In the Township of Burleigh and Anstruther, 
formerly in the Township of South Burleigh, in the 
County of Peterborough, being a rockface inscribed 
with petroglyphs in the south half of the west half 
of Lot 10 in Concession XI and being also mining 
claim E.O. 12546. O. Reg. 271/62, s. 2. 



Schedule 4 

THE LAWSON SITE 

In the City of London, formerly in the Township 
of London, in the County of Middlesex, and being 



composed of part of the southerly half of Lot 20 in 
the Fourth Concession of the said Township, more 
particularly described as follows : 

Premising that all bearings herein are astronomic 
and are referred to the bearings shown on Depart- 
ment of Highways Plan Number P-1813-21 registered 
as Number 104294. 

Beginning at a point in the limit between the 

northerly and southerly halves of said Lot 20 dis- 
tant 619.54 feet measured north 67° 59' 40" east 
along said Hmit from the northwesterly angle of the 
southerly half of said Lot 20; thence north 67° 59' 
40" east, along the limit between the northerly and 
southerly halves of said lot, 382.74 feet; thence 
south 75° 45' east, 87.48 feet; thence south 79° 12' 
east, 60.78 feet; thence south 75° 13' east, 45.30 
feet; thence south 55° 06' east, 85.41 feet; thence 
south 44° 00' east, 119.14 feet; thence south 31° 59' 
east, 105.08 feet; thence south 70° 12' 30" west, 
46.85 feet; thence north 85° 44' west, 65.43 feet; 
thence south 86° 36' 30" west, 87.12 feet; thence 
south 68° 07' 30' west, 59.63 feet; thence south 61° 
02' 30'' west, 68.49 feet; thence south 84° 50' 30' 
west, 40.55 feet; thence north 54° 00' west, 87.75 
feet; thence north 57° 47' 30" west, 72.10 feet; 
thence north 68° 40' 30" west, 85.97 feet; thence 
north 68° 39' 30" west, 98.03 feet; thence north 
85° 28' west, 84.55 feet; thence north 18° 57' west, 
more or less, 38.27 feet, more or less, to the place 
of beginning. Containing by admeasurement 3.226 
acres, more or less. O. Reg. 142/70, s. 1, revised. 



Schedule 5 

THE ROEBUCK SITE 

In the Township of Augusta, in the County of 
Grenville, and being composed of part of Lot 2, in 
Concession 6 of the said Township, the boundaries 
of the said parcel being described as follows : 

Premising that the bearings are astronomic derived 
from the southerly limit of the proposed widening of 
County Road Number 21, in the said Lot 2, having 
a bearing of north 50° 25' 30" east, as shown on a 
plan of survey dated March 26, 1970, by William 
J. Salter, O.L.S., and relating all bearings herein 
thereto ; 



Beginning at a point in the east half of the said 
Lot 2, distant 187.91 feet, measured south 31° 51' 10" 
east from a point distant 635.97 feet, measured south 
50° 25' 30" west from a point in the northeasterly 
hmit of the said Lot 2, distant 26.18 feet, measured 
south 31° 59' 45" east along the said northeasterly 
limit of Lot 2 from the northeasterly corner of the 
said Lot 2; thence north 76° 37' east, 204.86 feet; 
thence south 63° 56' 50" east, 237.53 feet; thence ^^ 
north 80° 52' 40" east, 71.25 feet; thence south 68° 
12' 50" east, 46.35 feet; thence south 40° 36' 30' 



Reg. 53 



ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORIC SITES PROTECTION 



343 



east, 130.81 feet; thence south 33° 01' 50" west, 
161.69 feet; thence south 48° 23' 50" west, 105.61 
feet ; thence south 58° 08' 40" west, 88. 14 feet ; thence 
south 63° 36' 20" west, 106.56 feet to the south- 
westerly limit of the east half of the said Lot 2; 
thence north 33° 43' 20" west, along the said south- 
westerly limit of the east half of Lot 2, a distance 
of 215.64 feet; thence north 31° 51' 10" west, con- 
tinuing along the said southwesterly limit of the 
east half of Lot 2, a distance of 321.11 feet; thence 
north 58° 08' 50" east, 18.00 feet, more or less, to 
the place of beginning ; 

And Designated as Part 1 on Ontario Depart- 
ment of Public Works Plan of Survey Number 
787-1 L; 

Together with a right of way over, along and 
upon a strip of land 18.00 feet in perpendicular 
width described as follows : 



Beginning at a point in the east half of the said 

Lot 2, distant 187.91 feet, measured south 31° 51' 
10" east from a point distant 635.97 feet, measured 
south 50° 25' 30" west from a point in the north- 
easterly limit of the said Lot 2, distant 28.18 feet, 
measured south 31° 59' 45" east along the said north- 
easterly limit of Lot 2 from the northeasterly corner 
of the said Lot 2; thence north 31° 51' 10" west 
213.61 feet to the southwesterly limit of the road 
allowance between concessions 6 and 7 ; thence south 
50° 22' 30" west, along the said southwesterly limit 
18.16 feet to the southwesterly limit of the east half 
of the said Lot 2; thence south 31° 51' 10" east, 
along the said southwesterly limit of the east half 
of Lot 2, a distance of 211.15 feet; thence north 
58° 08' 50" east, 18.00 feet to the place of beginning; 

And Designated as Parts 2 and 3 on Ontario 
Department of Public Works Plan of Survey Number 
787-11. O. Reg. 312/70, s. 1, revised. 



344 



ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORIC SITES PROTECTION 



Reg. 54 



REGULATION 54 

under The Archaeological and Historic Sites Protection Act 



HISTORIC SITES 

1. The lands described in each Schedule are 
designated as a historic site. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 28, 
s. 1, revised. 

Schedule 1 

CAHIAGUE HISTORIC SITE 

In the Township of Medonte in the County of 
Simcoe being composed of part of the west half of 
Lot 11 in Concession 14, more particularly described 
as follows : 

Beginning where an iron post has been planted 
at the southeast angle of the west half of said 
Lot 1 1 ; thence south 60° west along the fence 
marking the southern Umit of said Lot 1 1 , a distance 
of 967.5 feet to an iron post planted; thence north 
13° west 345 feet to an iron post planted; thence 
north 51° 30' east 242 feet to an iron post planted 
on the Une of a certain fence; thence north 58° 40' 
east along said fence 623 feet to an iron post 
planted on the hne of the fence marking the eastern 
limit of the west half of said Lot 1 1 ; thence south 
30° east along said fence marking said e£istem limit 
380 feet to the place of beginning. R.R.O. 1960, 
Reg. 28, Sched. 1, revised. 

Schedule 2 

THE PENETANGUISHENE MILITARY AND NAVAL 
ESTABLISHMENTS HISTORIC SITE 

1. In the Township of Tay in the County of 
Simcoe being composed of part of lots 122, 123 and 
124 in Concession I, E.P.R., part of Lot 124 in Con- 
cession II, E.P.R., and part of the road allowance 
between concessions I and II, E.P.R. and, premising 
that all bearings are astronomic, more particularly 
described as follows : 

Beginning at a point in the interior of Lot 122 in 
Concession I, E.P.R. , which said point may be 
located as follows : 

Beginning at a point in the northerly limit of 
Navy Street, distant 37.43 feet on a bearing of north 
1° 54' west from the northwesterly angle of Lot 95 
according to a plan registered in the registry office 
for Simcoe as No. 70, Town of Penetanguishene ; 
thence continuing north 1° 54' west, 125.43 feet to a 
standard iron bar planted at a point of curve ; thence 
on a curve to the left, having a radius of 853 feet, an 
arc measurement of 240. 19 feet to a standard iron bar 
planted at a point of tangent; thence north 18° 2' 
west, 234.29 feet to a standard iron bar planted; 
thence continuing north 18° 2' west, 406.35 feet to 
an iron bar planted; thence continuing north 18° 2' 



west, 406.35 feet to an iron bar planted; thence con- 
tinuing north 18° 2' west, 82.96 feet to a point 
where a standard iron bar is planted, which point is 
the place of beginning; thence north 18° 2' west a 
distance of 500 feet to a standard iron bar planted 
at a point of curve; thence on a curve to the left, 
having a radius of 768 feet and an arc distance of 
93.64 feet to a standard iron bar planted at a point 
of tangent; thence north 25° 2' west, 285.60 feet to 
a standard iron bar planted; thence north 18° 32' 
west, 110.32 feet to a standard iron bar planted; 
thence north 14° 50' west, 1067.61 feet, to a standard 
iron bar planted; thence north 23° 47' east, 208.42 
feet to a standard iron bar planted; thence south 
66° 23' east, 99.43 feet to a standard iron bar planted ; 
thence north 50° 55' east, 830.04 feet to a standard 
iron bar planted; thence north 34° 46' 30" west, 
160.58 feet to a standard iron bar planted; thence 
north 49° 47' 30" east, 229.03 feet to a standard iron 
bar planted; thence north 29° 21' west, 275.80 feet, 
more or less, to a standard iron bar planted at a point 
in the high water mark of Penetanguishene Bay; 
thence in a general northwesterly direction following 
that high water mark to and around a point of 
land ; thence continuing along that high water mark 
and in a general southwesterly direction 4,090 feet, 
more or less, to a point in that high water mark 
that is distant 130 feet, more or less, from the place of 
beginning, measured on a bearing of south 71° 58' 
west ; thence north 71° 58' east, 130 feet, more or less, 
to the place of beginning. 

2 . That part of Magazine Island in Penetanguishene 
Harbour lying above the high water mark thereof. 
O. Reg. 229/66, s. 1, revised. 

Schedule 3 

willow fort historic site 

In the Township of Vespra, in the County of 
Simcoe, and being composed of that part of the East 
half of Lot 14, in the Uth Concession of the said 
Township of Vespra more particularly described as 
follows : 

Beginning at a point where the southerly Umit 
of the right of way of the Canadian National Rail- 
ways through the said lot is intersected by the 
easterly limit of the said lot; thence southwesterly 
along the southerly limit of the said right of way 
of the Canadian National Railways, 688 feet to a 
point ; thence southeasterly in a straight line to the 
southeasterly angle of the said lot ; thence northerly 
along the easterly boundary of the said lot to the 
place of beginning; containing nine acres, more or 
less. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 28, Sched. 3, revised. 



Reg. 55 



ARCHITECTS 



345 



REGULATION 55 

under The Architects Act 



COMPLAINTS 

1. At its discretion, the Board may suspend or 
cancel the membership of any member or hcensee 
whom it finds guilty of misconduct or incompetence 
such as to render it desirable in the public interest 
that he should be so dealt with. R.R.O. 1960, 
Reg. 29.S. 1. 

2. The Board shall not take any such action until 
after a complaint, setting forth the alleged miscon- 
duct or incompetence and giving reasonable parti- 
culars, has been made under oath and filed with the 
secretary of the Board. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 29, s. 2. 

3. — ( 1 ) When a complaint is received , the secretary 
or the chairman or vice-chairman shall, within seven 
days thereafter, call a meeting of the Board to con- 
sider and act upon the complaint. R.R.O. 1960, 
Reg. 29, s. 3. (1) ; O. Reg. 312/63, s. 1(1). 



(2) The meeting shall be held not earlier than 
fourteen days and not later than twenty-one days 
after the day on which the complaint was received. 
O. Reg. 312/63, s. 1(2). 



(3) The meeting may be adjourned from time to 
time. R.R.O. 1960. Reg. 29, s. 3{3). 



4. — (1) Notice of the meeting, with a copy of the 
complaint, shall be sent by registered mail to each 
member of the Board, to the member complained of, 
at his address shown in the register, and to the person 
making the complaint. 

(2) The notice to the person making the complaint 
shall state that he may bring witnesses to substantiate 
his complaint and that, if he fails to attend the 
meeting, the matter may be dealt with in his absence. 
R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 29, s. 4. , 

5. The notice to the member complained of shall 
state that he will have an opportunity of submitting 
evidence and calling witnesses in his defence at the 
meeting and of examining opposing witnesses, and the 
notice to him shall state that, if he fails to attend, the 
Board may, in his absence, suspend or cancel his 
membership. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 29, s. 5. 

6. The member and any person complaining may 
be represented by counsel at the hearing of the com- 
plaint and the Board may call in a solicitor or a 
counsel for assistance and advice. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 
29, s. 6. 

7. The Board may cause notice of any order of 
cancellation or suspension, and the reason therefor, 
to be published in the public press. O. Reg. 312/63, 
s. 2, revised. 



-\ 



Reg. 56 



ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION OF CATTLE 



347 



REGULATION 56 

under The Artificial Insemination of Cattle Act 



GENERAL 

1. In this Regulation, "certificate of registration" 
means a certificate issued under the Livestock Pedigree 
Act (Canada). O. Reg. 26/64. s. 1. 

2. The owner of a herd of cattle, or his em- 
ployee, who is engaged in the breeding of cows in 
the herd by artificial insemination with semen col- 
lected from a bull in the herd is, in respect of the 
artificial insemination so performed, exempt from 
this Regulation. O. Reg. 32/68, s. 1. 

LICENCES 

3. — (1) An application for a hcence to commence 
or to continue to engage in a semen-producing 
business shall be in Form 1 . 

(2) A licence to commence or to continue to 
engage in a semen-producing business shall be in 
Form 2 and the fee therefor is $1. O. Reg. 26/64, 
S.2. 

4. — (1) An application for a licence to commence 
or to continue to engage in an inseminating business 
shall be in Form 3. 

(2) A hcence to commence or to continue to 
engage in an inseminating business shall be in Form 
4 and the fee therefor is $1 . O. Reg. 26/64, s. 3. 

5. — (1) An apphcation for a hcence to commence 
or to continue to act as an inseminator shall be in 
Form 5. 

(2) A licence to commence or to continue to act as 
an inseminator shall be in Form 6 and the fee there- 
for is $1. O. Reg. 26/64. s. 4. 

6. The fee for a Ucencfe in Form 2, 4 or 6 shall 
accompany the application for the licence. O. Reg. 
26/64, s. 5. 

7. — (1) A hcence in Form 2, 4 or 6 expires with 
the 31st day of December in the year for which it is 
issued. 



(2) A licence in Form 2, 
ferable. O. Reg. 26/64, s. 6. 



4 or 6 is not trans- 



REQUIREMENTS AND MINIMUM STANDARDS 

8. — (1) Every semen-producing business shall 
have a building or buildings adequate for the 
stabhng of bulls, the collecting of semen and the 
maintaining of records. O. Reg. 32/68. s. 2. 



(2) The buildings used for stabling bulls shall be 
kept clean and sanitary at all times. O. Reg. 26/64. 

s. 7 (2). 

9. — (1) Every semen-producing business and 
every inseminating business shall have facilities 
with refrigeration for the storing of semen. 

(2) Every semen-producing business shall have 
a laboratory with facihties for the, 

(a) sterilization of equipment ; 

{b) evaluation of semen ; and 

(c) shipping of semen. O. Reg. 32/68. s. 3. 

10. Every operator of a semen-producing business 
or an inseminating business shall maintain at his 
place of business, in respect of each bull from 
which semen is collected, stored or offered for sale, 

(a) the certificate of registration for a bull 
that is owned by the business ; or 

{b) a full statement of the information con- 
tained on the certificate of registration for 
a bull that is not owned by the business. 
O. Reg. 32/68, s. 3. 

11. — (1) Semen collected by a semen-producing 
business for the purpose of freezing shall be frozen 
at a laboratory approved by the Commissioner. O. 
Reg. 26/64, s. 10 (1). 

(2) Frozen semen shall be stored at a laboratory 
approved by the Commissioner. O. Reg. 26/64, 
s. 10(2);O. Reg. 32/68, s. 4(1). 

(3) Frozen semen stored in ampoules shall bear 
the full name and registration number of the bull 
from which the semen was collected and the date on 
which the semen was frozen. O. Reg. 26/64, s. 
10(3);O. Reg. 32/68, s. 4 (2). 

(4) Frozen semen that is not stored in ampoules 
shall bear positive identification in a manner ap- 
proved by the Commissioner. O. Reg. 32/68, s. 4 (3). 

12. — ( 1 ) The Commissioner shall not issue a licence 
in Form 6 unless the apphcant has completed a 
course of instruction approved by the Commissioner 
in the theory and practice of artificial insemination. 
O. Reg. 26/64, s. 11 (1). 

(2) Notwithstanding subsection 1, the Commis- 
sioner may issue a licence in Form 6 to a person 
who has not completed the course required by sub- 



348 



ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION OF CATTLE 



Reg. 56 



section 1, but he may cancel the hcence unless the 
course is completed within one year after a licence 
was first issued under this subsection. O. Reg. 
32/68,5.5. 

13. — (1) For each bull from which semen is col- 
lected, stored or offered for sale, every semen-pro- 
ducing business and every inseminating business 
shall provide the Ontario Veterinary College with, 

(a) blood samples of the bull ; or 

(b) a record of the blood type of the bull that 
has been obtained from a source approved 
by the Commissioner. 

(2) The operator of a semen-producing business 
or an inseminating business shall, upon request, 
provide the Commissioner with evidence satisfactory 
to the Commissioner that subsection 1 has been 
complied with. 

(3) Every semen-producing business and every 
inseminating business shall, by means of a blood test 
of both parents, verify the parentage of every bull 
from which semen is offered for sale. 

(4) Notwithstanding subsection 3, the Commis- 
sioner may waive a blood test of either or both parents 
where, in his opinion, it is impossible or impractical 
to obtain blood samples of either or both parents. 
O. Reg. 32/68, s. 6. 

HEALTH STANDARDS OF BULLS 

14. — (1) No semen shall be obtained by a semen- 
producing business or an inseminating business from 
a bull that does not test negative on a test for 
tuberculosis and brucellosis made not more than one 
year before the semen is to be obtained from the 
bull. 



(2) An inspector may enter and inspect the premises 
of an inseminating business or semen-producing 
business at any time, and may conduct such tests as 
are considered necessary by the Commissioner. 

(3) Every bull affected with or exposed to any 
infectious or contagious disease shall be segregated 
from other bulls. 



(4) The Commissioner may order that semen be 
destroyed if, in his opinion, the bull from which the 
semen was collected is affected with or has been ex- 
posed to an infectious or contagious disease capable 
of being transmitted in semen. O. Reg. 32/68, s. 7. 



RECORDS AND RETURNS 

15. Every person operating a semen-producing 
business or an inseminating business shall make 
returns to the Commissioner, 



(a) annually, at the end of each fiscal year of 
the business, consisting of an audited fin- 
ancial statement of the operations of the 
business for the fiscal year then ended ; and 

(ft) monthly, at the end of sixty days from the 
last day of the month for which the report 
is made, showing the number of cattle 
artificially inseminated and the number 
that show signs of being with calf. O. Reg. 
26/64,s. 14; O.Reg. 32/68, s. 7. 

GRANTS 

16. — (1) For the purpose of this section, Dual- 
Purpose Shorthorns and Red Polls are deemed to be 
dairy breeds. 

(2) The Minister may make grants to, 

(a) semen-producing businesses owned and 
operated by corporations incorporated 
under The Corporations Ad, or any pre- 
decessor thereof, as corporations without 
share capital ; and 

{b) inseminating businesses in territorial dis- 
tricts. O. Reg. 26/64, s. 15 (1, 2). 

(3) Grants may be made under subsection 2 to a 
semen-producing business for the purchase of, 

(a) a bull of a dairy breed in an amount up to 
but not exceeding one-third of the purchase 
price of the bull, or $750, whichever is the 
lesser ; and 

(6) a bull of a beef breed in an amount up to but 
not exceeding one-third of the purchase 
price of the bull, or $500, whichever is the 
lesser. 

(4) No grant referred to in subsection 3 shall be 
made until the purchaser of the bull has sub- 
mitted to the Commissioner, 

{a) an auditor's statement of the purchase 
price of the bull ; 

(b) a copy of the certificate of registration 
with ownership of the bull shown as duly 
transferred ; 

(c) a statement by the purchaser that the bull 
has proven to be a satisfactory breeder ; and 

{d) such further information as the Minister 
may require. 

(5) Grants may be made under subsection 2 to 
a semen-producing business or to an insemi- 
nating business in an amount not exceeding $2 for 
each animal artificially inseminated in a territorial 
district but in no case shall more than one grant be 
made in any year respecting any animal. O. Reg. 
32/68, s. 8. 



Reg. 56 



ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION OF CATTLE 



349 



ADVERTISING 

17. — (1) No person who sells, offers for sale or 
holds in possession for sale semen from a bull 
for or on behalf of a semen-producing business 
or an inseminating business shall publish or cause 
to be published any advertisement or statement 
respecting the bull that is untrue, deceptive, mis- 
leading or hkely to mislead. 

(2) Where a person who sells, offers for sale or 
holds in possession for sale semen from a bull 
for or on behalf of a semen-producing business 
or an inseminating business publishes or causes 
to be published an advertisement or statement re- 
specting the bull, he shall include in the advertise- 
ment or statement, 

(a) the most recent information in his pos- 
session relating to the conformation and pro- 
duction of the progeny of the bull ; and 

(b) all details known to him of any undesir- 
able inherited characteristic or genetic 
factor known to be transmitted by the bull 
to its progeny. O. Reg. 32/68, s. 9. 



Form 1 

The Artificial Insemination of Cattle Act 

APPLICATION FOR A LICENCE TO ENGAGE 
IN A SEMEN-PRODUCING BUSINESS 

To: The Live Stock Commissioner, 
Parhament Buildings, 
Toronto. Ontario. 



(name of applicant) 



(address) ^ 

apphes for a licence to engage in a semen-producing 
business for the year ending with the 31st day of 

December, 19 nnder The Artificial Insemination 

of Cattle Act, and the regulations, and in support of 
the application the following facts are stated : 



1. Business address of applicant 



2. Name of semen-producing business 



3. Location of semen-producing business 



(lot and 



concession, municipality, county, etc. , or district) 



4. Where apphcant is a corporation without share 
capital, state. 



{a) number of members 

{h) number of cows enrolled by members 
(c) membership fee, if any 



5. Breed or breeds to be serviced . 



6. Service fee charged, 



Dated at this day of ,19 



(signature of applicant) 

O. Reg. 26/64, Form 



Form 2 

The Artificial Insemination of Cattle Act, 

LICENCE TO ENGAGE IN A 
SEMEN-PRODUCING BUSINESS 



Year. 



No, 



Under The Artificial Insemination of Cattle Act, 
and the regulations, and subject to the limitations 
thereof, this hcence is issued to. 



(name) 



(address) 



to engage in a semen-producing business at 

(location) 



This Hcence expires with the 31st day of December, 

19 

Issued at Toronto, this. . . .day of , 19 



Live Stock Commissioner 

O. Reg. 26/64, Form 2. 



350 



ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION OF CATTLE 



Reg. 56 



Form 3 

The Artificial Insemination of Cattle Act 

APPLICATION FOR A LICENCE TO ENGAGE 
IN AN INSEMINATING BUSINESS 

To. : The Live Stock Commissioner, 
Parliament Buildings, 
Toronto, Ontario. 



(name of applicant) 

applies for a licence for the year ending with the 31st 
day of December, 19. . . . to engage in an inseminating 
business for the area 



under The Artificial Insemination of Cattle Act, and 
the regulations, and in support of the apphcation, 
the following fact is stated : 



Business address of the applicant 



Dated at , this . 

19.... 



day of 



(signature of applicant) 

O. Reg. 32/68, s. 10. 
Form 4 

The Artificial Insemination of Cattle Act 

LICENCE TO ENGAGE IN AN 
INSEMINATING BUSINESS 



Year, 



No. 



This licence expires with the 31st day of December, 



Under The Artificial Insemination of Cattle Act, 
and the regulations, and subject to the hmitations 
thereof, this licence is issued to. 



(name) 

(address) 
to engage in an inseminating business for the area 



19, 



Issued at Toronto, this day of , 19 . 



Live Stock Commissioner 

O. Reg. 32/68, s. 10. 

Form 5 

The Artificial Insemination of Cattle Act 

APPLICATION FOR A LICENCE TO ACT 
AS AN INSEMINATOR 

To : The Live Stock Commissioner, 
Parliament Buildings, 
Toronto, Ontario. 

(name of applicant) 

(address) 
applies for a licence to act as an inseminator for 
the area 



under The Artificial Insemination of Cattle Act, and 
the regulations, for the year ending with the 31st 

day of December, 19 ... . 

Dated at , this day of 

.19.... 



(signature of applicant) 
O. Reg. 32/68, s. 10. 
Form 6 



The Artificial Insemination of Cattle Act 

LICENCE TO ACT AS AN INSEMINATOR 

Year No 



Under The Artificial Insemination of Cattle Act, 
and the regulations, and subject to the limitations 
thereof, this licence is issued to, 

(name) 

(address) 
to act as an inseminator for the area 



This licence expires with the 31st day of December, 



19. 



Issued at Toronto, this day of 19 . 



Live Stock Commissioner 
O. Reg. 32/68,s.l0. 



Reg. 57 



ASSESSMENT 



351 



REGULATION 57 

under The Assessment Act 



ASSESSMENT AREAS AND REGIONS 

1. The following Assessment Areas are estab- 
lished : 

1 . The Eastern Assessment Area consisting of : 

i. Assessment Region Number 1. 

ii. Assessment Region Number 2. 

iii. Assessment Region Number 3. 

iv. Assessment Region Number 4, 

as established by section 2. 

2. The Lake Ontario Assessment Area consist- 
ing of : 

i. Assessment Region Number 5. 

ii. Assessment Region Number 6. 

iii. Assessment Region Number 7. 

iv. Assessment Region Number 8, 

as established by section 2. 

3. The Metropolitan Assessment Area consist- 
ing of : 

i. Assessment Region Number 9. 

ii. Assessment Region Number 10. 

iii. Assessment Region Number 11. 

iv. Assessment Region Number 12, 

as established by section 2. 

4. The Central Assessment Area consisting of : 

i. Assessment Region Number 13. 
ii. Assessment Region Number 14. 
iii. Assessment Region Number 15. 
iv. Assessment Region Number 16. 
V. Assessment Region Number 17, 
as established by section 2. 



5. The Grand River-Niagara Assessment Area 
consisting of : 

i. Assessment Region Number 18. 

ii. Assessment Region Number 19. 

iii. Assessment Region Number 20. 

iv. Assessment Region Number 21. 

V. Assessment Region Number 22, 

as established by section 2. 

6. The Southwestern Assessment Area consist- 
ing of : 

i. Assessment Region Number 23. 

ii. Assessment Region Number 24. 
iii. Assessment Region Number 25. 
iv. Assessment Region Number 26. 

V. Assessment Region Number 27, 
as established by section 2. 

7. The Northern Assessment Area consisting 
of: 

i. Assessment Region Number 28. 

ii. Assessment Region Number 29. 
iii. Assessment Region Number 30. 
iv. Assessment Region Number 31. 

V. Assessment Region Number 32, 

as established by section 2. O. Reg. 10/70, 
s. 1. revised. 



2. The following Assessment Regions are estab- 
lished : 

1. Assessment Region Number 1, consisting of 
the counties of Prescott, Russell, Glengarry, 
Stormont and Dundas. 

2. Assessment Region Number 2, consisting of 
the counties of Grenville, Lanark and 
Leeds. 



352 



ASSESSMENT 



Reg. 57 



3. Assessment Region Number 3, consisting of 
The Regional Municipality of Ottawa- 
Carleton. 

4. Assessment Region Number 4, consisting of 
the County of Renfrew. 

5. Assessment Region Number 5, consisting of 
the counties of Lennox and Addington and 
Frontenac. 

6. Assessment Region Number 6, consisting of 
the counties of Hastings and Prince Edward. 

7. Assessment Region Number 7, consisting of 
the counties of Haliburton, Victoria and 
Peterborough. 

8. Assessment Region Number 8, consisting of 
the counties of Durham and Northumber- 
land. 

9. Assessment Region Number 9, consisting of 
the City of Toronto. 

10. Assessment Region Number 10, consisting 
of the Borough of North York. 

11. Assessment Region Number 11, consisting 
of the boroughs of Scarborough and East 
York. 

12. Assessment Region Number 12, consisting 
of the boroughs of Etobicoke and York. 

13. Assessment Region Number 13, consisting 
of the County of Ontario. 

14. Assessment Region Number 14, consisting 
of The Regional MunicipaUty of York. 

15. Assessment Region Number 15, consisting 
of the counties of Halton and Peel. 

16. Assessment Region Number 16, consisting 
of the County of Simcoe. 

17. Assessment Region Number 17, consisting 
of The District Municipality of Muskoka. 



18. Assessment Region Number 18, consisting 
of The Regionzd Municipality of Niagara. 

19. Assessment Region Number 19, consisting 
of the County of Wentworth. 

20. Assessment Region Number 20, consisting 
of the counties of Brant, Norfolk and Haldi- 
mand. 

21. Assessment Region Number 21, consisting 
of the County of Waterloo. 

22. Assessment Region Number 22, consisting 
of the counties of Wellington and Dufferin. 

23. Assessment Region Number 23, consisting 
of the counties of Middlesex, Elgin and 
Oxford. 

24. Assessment Region Number 24, consisting 
of the counties of Huron and Perth. 

25. Assessment Region Number 25, consisting 
of the counties of Grey and Bruce. 

26. Assessment Region Number 26, consisting 
of the counties of Lambton and Kent. 

27. Assessment Region Number 27, consisting 
of the County of Essex. 

28. Assessment Region Number 28, consisting 
of the territorial districts of Nipissing and 
Parry Sound. 

29. Assessment Region Number 29, consisting 
of the territorial districts of Cochrane and 
Timiskaming, 

30. Assessment Region Number 30, consisting 
of the territorial districts of Sudbury and 
Manitoulin. 

31. Assessment Region Number 31, consisting 
of the Territorial District of Algoma. 

32. Assessment Region Number 32, consisting 
of the territorial districts of Thunder Bay, 
Kenora and Rainy River. O. Reg. 10/70, 
2, revised. 



Reg. 58 



ASSESSMENT 



353 



REGULATION 58 

under The Assessment Act 



1. An enumeration questionnaire under sub- 
section 1 of section 14 of the Act shall be in the 
following Form : O. Reg. 257/70, s. 1 . 



Form 

The Assessment Act 
ENUMERATION QUESTIONNAIRE 



(Insert the name and address of the pertinent 
Regional Assessment Office) 



Name of Assessed Owner . 



Assessed Tenant. 



(Above to be filled in before dehvery or 
maihng of the Notice) 

1. {a) What is the full name(s) of the owner(s) and 

tenant (s), if any, and spouse(s) ? 

(6) Do you reside on the property ? 



(c) Are you the owner, tenant, or the spouse 
of an owner or tenant ? 

{d) What is your year of birth ? 

(e) What is your sex ? 

(/) What is your marital status ? 

{g) Are you a Roman CathoHc ? (This question 

is asked for the determination of school 

support only) 

{h) Are you a Canadian Citizen, British Subject 

or Alien ? 

{i) What is your occupation? (Please be 

specific) 

(;■) In which municipahty are you employed? 



(k) If you are employed by a mine, what is the 
name of the mine ? 

(/) Will you have resided in Canada for the 

twelve months preceding the 1st day of 

October of this year ? 

2. If you are an owner (or tenant), is your spouse a 
co-owner (or co-tenant) ? 

3. If you are a tenant, what is the name and 
address of the owner ? 

4. {a) Does the spouse of the occupier (owner or 

tenant) reside on this property ? 

(b) If not, what is the spouse's name, address, 
year of birth, and citizenship ? 

5. {a) Is this a farm of more than 20 acres? 



{b) If there are any sisters of the owner of 
this farm over the full age of 21 years, 
also residing on the property, what are 
their names ? 



6. Please complete the following information per- 
tinent to any other persons residing on the 
property : 

1 . What is his full name ? 

2. What is his year of birth ? 

3. Is the person male or female ? 

4. What is his marital status ? 

5. Is he a Canadian Citizen, British Subject 

or Alien ? 

6. What is his occupation? (Please be 
specific) 



354 



ASSESSMENT 



Reg. 58 



7. In which municipaUty is he employed? 

8. If he is employed by a mine, what is the 
name of the mine ? 

9. Has he resided in this municipahty for the 
twelve months preceding the 1st day of 
January of this year and has he continued 

to reside here ? 

7. (a) Have you made any major alterations to 

this property in the last year ? 



(b) If yes, describe briefly. 



8. What is your mailing address? 



Dated at , this 

day of 19.... 



(signature) 
O. Reg. 257/70, Form, revised. 



Reg. 59 



ASSESSMENT 



355 



REGULATION 59 

under The Assessment Act 



FORM OF CENSUS REPORT 

1. The report of the census of the inhabitants of 

each municipahty and the unorganized territory in 

a locaUty as required under section 23 of the Act 

shall be in the following Form. O. Reg. 302/70, s. 1. 

Form 

The Assessment Act 

REPORT OF POPULATION 

Name of Municipality or Locahty 
County, etc., or District Date 

A. Age Groups 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, 
13-14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21-25, 
26-30, 31-35, 36-40, 41-45, 46-50, 
51-55, 56-59, 60, 61-65, 66-69, 70 
and over. 



B. 



C. 



School Support 


(i) 


Public 


(ii) Separate 


Sex 




(i) 


Male 


(ii) 


Female 



Assessed or Not Assessed 
(i) Assessed Male 
(ii) Assessed Female 
(iii) Not Assessed Male 
(iv) Not Assessed Female 



O. Reg. 302/70, Form. 



356 



ASSESSMENT 



Reg. 60 



REGULATION 60 

under The Assessment Act 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT UNDER 
SUBSECTION 1 OF SECTION 40 OF THE ACT 

1. A notice of assessment under subsection 1 of 
section 40 of the Act shall be in Form 1. O. Reg. 
138/70, s. 1. 

Form 1 

The Assessment Act 

NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT 

This is not a tax bill 

WARD POLL MADE IN 19... 

(if applicable) 

FOR TAXATION YEAR 19... 

Take notice that you are assessed for taxation as 
specified below. If you consider yourself improperly 
assessed in any respect you or your agent may 
appeal on or before the date specified. Notify the 
undersigned in writing of your complaint and it will 
be tried by the assessment review court. 



See Reverse Side For, 
(i) Notice of Appeal 
(ii) Codes Used On Notice 



Municipality 



Signed 



Assessment Commissioner or Assessor 



Prop. 
No. 



Tenant 
No. 



You are assessed as a, 
school supporter. 





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Reg. 60 



ASSESSMENT 



357 



Description of Property Assessed 
(Plan or Concession, Lot Number) 



Occupant's 
Portion 


Total 
Real Property 


Liable For 
Tax Rate 






RP 


RS 


T 


T 


CP 




E 


CS 




BP 


ET 


BS 



Last Day For Appeal 



Date Mailed 



Business Percentage 



Citizenship Status 



RE\ERSE SIDE 



Codes 



Marital Status 



M 


— Married Man 


MW 


— Married Woman 


WR 


— Widower 


W 


— Widow 


B 


— Single Man 


S 


— Single Woman 



A 
B 

C 
Blank 



Alien 

British Subject 
Canadian Citizen 
British Subject or 
Canadian Citizen 



Electoral Status 



~ 


Owner 


L — 


Lessee 


T — 


Tenant 


OC — 


Occupier 


MF — 


Eligible to Vote by Reason of Being 




Spouse of an Owner, Tenant or 




Lessee 


FS — 


Farmer's Son 


FD — 


F"armer's Daughter 


SF — 


Sister of Unmarried Farmer 


EF ~ 


Extended Franchise (Eligible to 




Vote Under The Municipal Fran- 




chise Extension Act.) 


Occupation 




ME — 


Municipal Elector 


NR — 


Non-Resident 



Description of Property Assessed 

AC — Acres FR — Frontage 

DP — Depth 



Occupant's Portion 

T — Total Assessed Value of the Oc- 

cupant's Portion 
ET — Total Value of Exempt Assessment 



358 ASSESSMENT Reg. 60 

Total Real Property NOTICE OF APPEAL 

T — Total Assessed \'alue of the Property , 19 . , . 

E — The Amount of Exempt Assessment Sir: Take notice that I hereby appeal for the follow- 

Included in the Total Assessed ing reasons: 
Value of the Property. 



Liable For Tax Rate 

RP — Residential 

Public School Rate 

RS — Residential 

Separate School Rate 

CP — Commercial 

Public School Rate 

CS — Commercial 

Separate School Rate Signature 

BP — Business 

Public School Rate 

Please Give Address In Full 
BS — Business 

Separate School Rate 

O. Reg. 138/70, Form 1. 



Reg. 61 



ASSESSMENT 



359 



REGULATION 61 

under The Assessment Act 



PAYMENTS TO MINING MUNICIPALITIES, 
1970 

1. — (1) In this Regulation, 

(a) "local board" means any school board, 
except a divisional board of education 
established under Part IV of The Secondary 
Schools and Boards of Education Act, public 
utility commission, transportation commis- 
sion, public library board, board of park 
management, local board of health, board 
of commissioners of police, planning board 
or authority established or exercising any 
power or authority under any general or 
special Act with respect to any of the affairs 
or purposes, including school purposes, of 
a municipality ; 

(b) "mining employee" means any person who 
is in receipt of or entitled to any salary, 
wages, or other direct compensation for 
services or labour performed in Ontario at 
the locations excepted from assessment 
under paragraph 19 of section 3 of The 
Assessment Act, and who is, 

(i) resident in a mining municipality at 
the time of the making of the last 
assessment of the mining munici- 
pality, or 

(ii) resident outside a mining munici- 
paUty and employed at a mine or 
mineral work in a mining munici- 
pahty on the 1st day of October in 
any year ; 

(c) "municipaUty" means a city, town, village, 
township or improvement district. 

(2) A person shall be deemed to be resident in that 
municipaUty in which he is assessed as owner or 
tenant of a residence in which his wife or any 
dependent child resides and, if not so assessed, in 
that municipaHty in which he ordinarily eats and 
sleeps. O.Reg. 399/70, s. 1. 



2. This Regulation appUes to designated mining 
municipahties only. O. Reg. 399/70, s. 2. 



3. The following municipalities are designated as 
mining municipalities for the purposes of this Regu- 
lation : 



The City of Sudbury. 



2. The towns of Blind River, Caledonia, 
Capreol, Cobalt, Espanola, Geraldton, 
Goderich, Haileybury, Latchford, Levack, 
Lively, Renfrew, Timmins. 

3. The villages of Bancroft, Beachburg, Cob- 
den, Deloro, Hagersville, Madoc, Marmora. 

4. The townships of Atikokan, Balfour, Bel- 
mont and Methuen, Black River-Matheson, 
Bucke, Caldwell, Cardiff, Casimir, Jennings 
and Appleby, Coleman, Cosby, Mason and 
Martland, Dowhng, Drury, Denison and 
Graham, Dungannon, Elliot Lake, Falcon- 
bridge, Hagar, James, Larder Lake, Mar- 
mora and Lake, McGarry, Michipicoten, 
Mountjoy, Nairn, Neelon and Garson, 
Oneida, Playfair, Ratter and Dunnet, Ray- 
side, Red Lake, Ross, Seneca, Teck, Tisdale, 
Valley East, Waters, Westmeath, Whitney. 

5. The improvement districts of Balmertown, 
Beardmore, Bicroft, Ear Falls, Gauthier, 
Manitouwadge, Onaping, Renabie, 
Temagami. O. Reg. 399/70, s. 3. 

4. In the year 1970 the Minister shall make a pay- 
ment to each mining municipality in accordance 
with Schedule I and the Minister may make such 
adjustments thereto as may be necessary upon final 
determination of additional assessment under sec- 
tion 87 of The Assessment Act, 1968-69. O. Reg. 
399/70, s. 4. 

5. For the purpose of apportioning the county 
rate to be levied in the year 1971, the amount of 
the payment to a mining municipality deemed to be 
computed with reference to mine profits and the 
aggregate mill rate referred to in clauses a and b of 
subsection 2 of section 72 of The Assessment Act, 
shall be as set out in Schedule 2. O. Reg. 399/70, 
s. 5. 

6. Where a mining municipality does not comply 
with this Regulation or does not obtain the approval 
of the Minister to, 

(a) the estimates of the municipality and its 
local boards ; 

{b) the amounts to be provided for and included 
in the estimates, whether to be provided by 
taxation or otherwise ; 

(c) the imposition, rating and levying of all 
rates, assessments and taxation upon any 
or all of the rateable property within the 
municipality ; 



360 



ASSESSMENT 



Reg. 61 



(d) the rates, rents and charges imposed, levied 
or collectable for supply or service of any 
public utihty ; 

{e) the imposition and charging of all Hcence, 
permit or other fees, charges and expenses; 
and 

(/) the sale or other disposition of any assets, 

the Minister may withhold the whole or any part of 
a payment from the mining municipality. O. Reg. 
399/70, s. 6. 

7. The Minister shall have access at all times to all 
books, records, papers and documents of a mining 
municipality and of every local board, including, but 
without limiting the generahty of the foregoing, all 
assessment rolls, collectors' rolls, by-laws, minute 
books, books of account, vouchers and other records, 
papers and documents relating to its and their 
financial transactions, and may inspect, examine, 
audit and copy the books, records, papers and 
documents. O. Reg. 399/70, s. 7. 

8.— ( 1 ) In each year the assessor of a mining muni- 
cipality shall enter in a register, provided for the 
purpose by the clerk of the municipality, the name of 
every mining employee residing in the municipality, 
the name of the mine or mineral work at which the 
person is employed and the name of the municipality 
in which the mine or mineral work is located. 

(2) Where the mine or mineral work is located in 
an area without municipal organization, the word 
"unorganized" shall be entered by the assessor after 
the name of the mine or mineral work. 

(3) The register duly completed and certified by 
the assessor shall be returned to the clerk of the muni- 
cipality with the assessment roll. 

(4) The clerk shall make and certify a return to the 
Minister, showing the number of mining employees, 

(fl) residinginand working in the municipality; 
and 

(b) residing in and working outside the muni- 
cipahty, 

as determined by the register. O. Reg. 399/70, s. 8. 

9. The Minister shall determine the distribution of 
the mining revenue payment benefit to municipal, 
school, and county taxpayers in the year 1970 in 
those municipalities where the 1969 mining revenue 
payment was partly calculated with reference to 
mines profits. O. Reg. 399/70, s. 9. 

10. The Minister may designate the amount of 
mining payment to be made in the year 1970 to any 
municipality that in previous years was not a 
designated mining municipahty. O. Reg. 399/70, 
s. 10. 



Schedule 1 



City 

Sudbury 
Towns 

Blind River 

Caledonia 

Capreol 

Cobalt 

Espanola 

Geraldton 

Goderich 

Haileybury 

Latchford 

Levack 

Lively 

Renfrew 

Timmins 

Villages 

Bancroft 

Beachburg 

Cobden 

Deloro 

Hagersville 

Madoc 

Marmora 

Townships 

Atikokan 

Balfour 

Belmont and Methuen 

Black River-Matheson 

Bucke 

Caldwell 



3,104,392 
$ 

51,675 
4.771 
24,116 
77,914 
10,891 
64,914 

138,80a 

26,916 

3,567 

182,244 

173,128 
22,7^6 

488,582 

1,854 
1,854 
3.165 
2,100 
5,501 
6,138 
18,782 

$ 

437,251 

273,922 

18,970 

40,001 

20.835 

4.329 



Reg. 61 



ASSESSMENT 



361 



Cardiff 




198 


Rayside 


143,580 


Casimir, Jennings and 


Appleby 


10,379 


Red Lake 


60,727 


Coleman 




25,044 


Ross 


38,590 


Cosby, Mason and Martland 


7,259 


Seneca 


6.442 


Dowling 




68,671 


Teck 


303,478 


Drury, Denison and Graham 


111,333 


Tisdale 


394,695 


Dungannon 




243 


Valley East 


229,985 


Elhot Lake 




494,406 


Waters 


26,856 


Falconbridge 




50,175 


Westmeath 


3,164 


Hagar 




15,298 


Whitney 


78,671 


James 




4,909 


Improvement Districts 


$ 


Larder Lake 




36,731 


Balmertown 


103,665 


Marmora and Lake 




20,728 


Beardmore 


4,548 


McGarry 




35,396 


Bicroft 


39,197 


Michipicoten 




187,870 


Ear Falls 


5,264 


Mountjoy 




27,637 


Gauthier 


5,927 


Nairn 




4,862 


Manitouwadge 


465.659 


Neelon and Garson 




335,967 


Onaping 


76.814 


Oneida 




10,056 


Renabie 


13,199 


Playfair 




2,957 


Temagami 


30,575 


Ratter and Dunnet 




12,760 
Schec 


0. Reg. 435/70, s. 1 
lule2 


0. Reg. 541/70, s. 1. 



County 


Municipality 


Amount of Payment 

Deemed To Be Computed 

With Reference To Mine Profits 


Aggregate 
Mill Rate 


Huron 

Peterborough 
Hastings 
Haldimand 

Renfrew 


Town of Goderich 

Township of Belmont and Methuen 

Township of Marmora and Lake 

Township of Oneida 

Township of Seneca 

Township of Ross 


$ 

59,920.00 

4.211.45 
6.803.34 
1,949.11 
1.256.85 
13.257.53 


71.00 
36.54 
42.76 
38.57 
36.98 
41.40 



O. Reg. 399/70, Sched. 2. 



Reg. 62 



ASSIGNMENT OF BOOK DEBTS 



363 



REGULATION 62 

under The Assignment of Book Debts Act 



FORM OF RENEWAL STATEMENT 

1. A renewal statement shall be in Form 1. O. 
Reg. 495/70, s. 1. 

Form 1 

The Assignment of Books Debts Act 
RENEWAL STATEMENT 

Statement exhibiting the interest of 

in the assignment of book debts dated the day 

of ,19 , made between 

, of 

and of 

and registered in the office of the Clerk of the 



Court of the 

of , on the day of 

, 19 as number 

The said is still the assignee 

of the book debts and has not assigned the assignment 
(or is the assignee of the assign- 
ment by virtue of an assignment thereof from 

to him, dated the day of 

, 19 ) {or as the case may he). 

A.B. 
(Signature of Assignee) 
O. Reg. 495/70, Form 1. 



364 



ASSIGNMENT OF BOOK DEBTS 



Reg. 63 



REGULATION 63 

under The Assignment of Book Debts Act 



GENERAL 

1. In this Regulation, 

(a) "branch fihng office" means a branch office 
of the registration system under The 
Personal Property Security Act and includes 
the office of the clerk of each county or 
district court ; 

{b) "central filing office" means the central 
office of the registration system under The 
Personal Property Security Act; 

(c) "collateral" means all such accounts and 
debts whether existing or future as in the 
ordinary course of business would be 
entered in books, whether actually entered 
or not , and includes any part or class thereof ; 

{d) "consumer goods" means goods that are 
used or acquired for use primarily for 
personal, family or household purposes; 

{e) "debtor" means a person making an assign- 
ment of book debts ; 

{/) "equipment" means goods that are not 
inventory or consumer goods ; 

{g) "inventory" means goods that are de- 
livered to a person for the purpose of 
resale by him in the course of business; 

{h) "motor vehicle" means an automobile, 
motor-cycle, motorized snow vehicle or 
any other vehicle propelled or driven other- 
wise than by muscular power, but does not 
include the cars of electric or steam rail- 
ways, or other vehicles running only upon 
rails, traction engine, farm tractor, self- 
propelled implement of husbandry or road- 
building machine ; 



(j) "recorded" means, 

(i) when used in respect of an assign- 
ment or other instrument that it is 
registered and when tendered for 
registration was accompanied by a 
financing statement or financing 
change statement, and 



(ii) when used in respect of the name of 
a debtor or secured party. 



A. the name as set out in the 
financing statement or 
financing change statement 
that accompanied an 
assignment or other in- 
strument tendered for reg- 
istration, or 

B. the amended name as set 
out in a financing change 
statement, described as an 
amendment, that is filed; 

{j) "registering agent" means the person who 
is acting as agent for the secured party 
when submitting a statement to the office 
of the clerk of a county or district court 
but does not include a clerk or other em- 
ployee of the secured party ; 

(k) "secured party" means a person to whom 
an assignment of book debts is made. 
O. Reg. 496/70, s. 1. 

FORM OF STATEMENT AND WHEN REQUIRED 

2. — (1) Where this Regulation requires or permits 
a statement to accompany an assignment or other 
instrument tendered for registration, the form of 
statement to be used shall be the form of financing 
statement or financing change statement provided or 
approved by the registrar. 

(2) Each Une, except the lines described on the 
financing statement as error correction hues, on 
which information is to be set out in a financing 
statement or financing change statement shall be 
numbered. O. Reg. 496/70, s. 2(1, 2). 

(3) Where this Regulation requires that an assign- 
ment of book debts or other instrument tendered for 
registration be accompanied by a financing state- 
ment or financing change statement, the assignment 
of book debts or other instrument shall be accom- 
panied by the statement when tendered for regis- 
tration. O. Reg. 496/70, s. 2(3), amended. 



REGISTRATION OF AN ASSIGNMENT OF BOOK 
DEBTS 

3. An assignment of book debts tendered for 
registration shall be accompanied by a financing 
statement. O. Reg. 496/70, s. 3. 



4. A financing statement, 
(a) shall set out. 



Reg. 63 



ASSIGNMENT OF BOOK DEBTS 



365 



(i) the name of the debtor and, where 
the debtor is an individual person, 
his date of birth and sex, 

(ii) the address of the debtor, 

(iii) the name of the secured party, 

(iv) the address of the secured party, 

(v) that the classification of the collat- 
eral is other than consumer goods, 
inventory or equipment, 

(vi) that a motor vehicle is not included 
in the collateral, 

(vii) that book debts are the subject 
matter of the assignment by in- 
dicating that book debts are included 
in the collateral, and 

(viii) whether the principal amount se- 
cured can or cannot exceed |25,000; 
and 

{b) may set out the name and address of the 
registering agent, if any ; and 

(c) may set out a description of the collateral 
on any of the lines numbered 13, 14 or 15. 
O. Reg. 496/70, s. 4. 

REGISTRATION OF A RENEWAL 

5. A renewal statement tendered for registration 
in respect of an assignment of book debts that is 
not recorded shall be accompanied by a financing 
statement, designated as a transition filing, which 
shall set out the registration number of the assign- 
ment of book debts and the information required by 
section 4, but the date of birth of the debtor need not 
be set out. O. Reg. 496/70, s. 5. 

6. A renewal statement tendered for registration 
in respect of an assignment of book debts that is 
recorded shall be accompanied by a financing change 
statement, designated as a renewal, which shall 
set out the information required by section 14. 
O. Reg. 496/70, s. 6. 

REGISTRATION OF A CERTIFICATE OF DISCHARGE 

7. — (1) A certificate of discharge tendered for 
registration in respect of an assignment of book 
debts that is recorded shall be accompanied by a 
financing change statement, designated as a dis- 
charge, which shall set out the information required 
by section 14. 

(2) If there are two or more assignors residing 
in different registration districts affected by the 
discharge and a certificate of the entry of the dis- 
charge or a dupUcate or other original of the certif- 



icate of discharge is tendered for registration under 
subsection 3 of section 5 of the Act in respect of an 
assignment of book debts that is recorded, it shall 
be accompanied by a financing change statement, 
designated as a discharge, which shall set out the 
information required by section 14. O. Reg. 496/70, 
S.7. 

REGISTRATION OF A CERTIFICATE OF 
PARTIAL DISCHARGE 

8. A certificate of partial discharge tendered for 
registration in respect of an assignment of book 
debts that is recorded shall be accompanied by a 
financing change statement, designated as a partial 
discharge, which, 

(fl) shall set out the information required by 
section 14; and 

{b) may set out a description of the collateral 
that is discharged. O. Reg. 496/70, s. 8. 

AMENDMENT OF INFORMATION 

9. — (1) A financing change statement, signed by 
the secured party, to amend information set out in 
a financing statement or financing change statement, 

{a) which was incorrectly transcribed onto a 
financing statement or financing change 
statement ; 

{b) in respect of the address of the debtor or of 
the secured party ; 

(c) in respect of the name of the debtor or of the 
secured party where the name has been 
changed through legal process ; 

{d) in respect of the date of birth or sex of the 
debtor ; 

{e) in respect of the classification of the 
collateral ; 

{f) to show that a motor vehicle is not included 
in the collateral ; 

(g) to show that book debts are the subject 
matter of the assignment ; or 

(A) in respect of whether the principal amount 
secured can or cannot exceed $25,000, 

may be tendered for filing in the office of the clerk 
of the county or district court where the assignment 
of book debts is registered at any time during the 
period the registration of the assignment of book 
debts is effective. 

(2) The financing change statement referred to in 
subsection 1 shall be described as an amendment 
and shall set out, 



366 



ASSIGNMENT OF BOOK DEBTS 



Reg. 63 



(a) the registration number shown on the 
financing statement or financing change 
statement containing the information to 
be amended ; 

(6) the name of one of the debtors as it is 
recorded, or where information as to the 
name, address, date of birth or sex of one of 
two or more debtors is to be amended, 
the name of that debtor as it is recorded; 

(c) the number of the Une in the financing 
statement or financing change statement 
containing the information to be amended ; 

(d) the Hne of information to be substituted 
for the line referred to in clause c of this 
subsection ; and 

{e) a brief statement of the reason for the 
amendment. O. Reg. 496/70, s. 9. 

PARTICULARS OF CONTENT OF FORMS 

10. The name of a debtor or secured party in a 
financing statement or financing change statement 
shall be set out to show, 

(a) where the debtor or secured party is an 
individual person, the first given name, 
followed by the initial of the second given 
name, if any, followed by the surname ; or 

(b) where the debtor or secured party is not 
an individual person, the name of the 
partnership or corporation, or as the case 
may be. O. Reg. 496/70, s. 10. 

11. The registrar may assign a number to a person 
and the number may be set out in a financing 
statement or financing change statement with or 
in lieu of the name and address of the person. O. 
Reg. 496/70, s. 11. 

12. The date of birth in a financing statement or 
financing change statement shall be set out to show, 

(a) the day of the month in numerals ; 

(6) the first three letters of the name of the 
month ; and 

(c) the last two digits of the number of the 
year. O. Reg. 496/70, s. 12. 

13. The address of a debtor or secured party in 
a financing statement or financing change state- 
ment, 

{a) shall set out one of, 

(i) the street number, if any, the street 
name, if any, and the name of the 
municipality , 



(ii) the name of the municipality and 
the rural route number , 

(iii) the name of the municipality, the 
postal station, if any, and the box 
number , or 

(iv) the lot number, concession number, 
and the name of the township ; 

{b) may set out the apartment or suite number ; 

(c) may set out the postal zone number; and 

(d) shall set out the name of the province, 
territory or state in abbreviated form that 
does not exceed four alphabetic char- 
acters. O. Reg. 496/70, s. 13. 

14. A financing change statement, other than a 
statement described as an amendment, shall set 
out, 

{a) the registration number ; and 

{b) the name of one of the debtors, 

as set out in the statement accompanying the last 
instrument recorded that relates to the assignment 
or, if none, as set out in the statement accompanying 
the recorded assignment. O. Reg. 496/70, s. 14, 



APPROVED FORMS 

15. Any person may apply to the registrar for 
approval of the form of a financing statement or 
financing change statement and the registrar may 
approve the form or may approve its use for a 
Umited time only or may otherwise quahfy his 
approval and may require that the approval or 
any qualification of the approval be printed on the 
form. O. Reg. 496/70, s. 15. 



PROCEDURE 

16. — (1) A financing statement or financing 
change statement that is submitted to the clerk of 
a county or district court shall be submitted in 
duplicate or in triplicate, unseparated, and the 
original shall be known as the central filing office 
copy, the first copy shall be known as the branch 
filing office copy and the second copy, if any, shall 
be known as the registrant's copy. 

(2) Where a statement referred to in subsection 
1 is accepted by the clerk, the clerk shall number 
the statement, separate the copies, forward the 
central filing office copy to the central filing office, 
attach the branch filing office copy to the assign- 
ment or other instrument and return the registrant's 
copy, if any, to the registrant at the office of the 
clerk. 



Reg. 63 



ASSIGNMENT OF BOOK DEBTS 



367 



(3) Where a registrant requests the return to him 
of the registrant's copy of the statement referred 
to in subsection 1 by post and provides a prepaid, 
addressed envelope, the clerk shall comply with the 
request. O. Reg. 496/70, s. 16. 

MANNER OF RECORDING 

17. — (1) The information required or permitted 
by this Regulation to be set out in a financing 
statement shall be recorded in the statement in a 
manner suitable for conversion by the technique 
known as optical character recognition and, without 
limiting the generality of the foregoing, 

(a) the information shall be clearly, neatly and 
legibly typewritten or machine printed in 
black ink without erasures, interlineation 
or alterations ; 

(b) alphabetic characters shall be in upper case 
only ; and 

(c) the information shall be without punctua- 

tion marks or symbols, 



but where the type style known as Perry font is 
used, lower case letters, punctuation marks and 
symbols may be used. 



(2) An error made in transcribing information 
onto a financing statement in respect of, 

(a) the name or address of a debtor ; 

{b) the name or address of a secured party; 

(c) the description of the collateral ; or 

{d) the name or address of a registering agent, 

may be corrected before the statement is submitted 
with an assignment or other instrument tendered for 
registration by typing an "X" in the column de- 
scribed on the statement as the error correction 
column on the line containing the error and typing 
the correct line of information on either of the lines 
described on the statement as error correction lines 
together with the line number of the line that is 
corrected. O. Reg. 496/70, s. 17. 



r 



Reg. 64 ATHLETICS CONTROL 369 

REGULATION 64 

under The Athletics Control Act 

AMOUNT OF TAX 

1. The amount payable to the Minister under subsection 1 of section 5 of the Act is 2 per cent of the 
gross receipts of the contest or exhibition. R.R.O. 1960, Reg. 32, s. 1. 



370 



ATHLETICS CONTROL 



Reg. 65 



REGULATION 65 

under The Athletics Control Act 



GENERAL 

INTERPRETATION 

In this Regulation and in the Act, 

{a) " amateur' ' , when used in respect of a natural 
person, means a person who has not at 
any time, 

(i) entered or competed in any athletic 
contest or exhibition for a staked 
bet, private or public money or gate 
receipts, or received any considera- 
tion for his services as an athlete 
except merchandise or an order for 
merchandise not exceeding $35 in 
value, or reasonable travelling and 
hving expenses actually incurred 
while going to, remaining at, and 
returning from, the place of contest 
or exhibition, 

(ii) taught, pursued or assisted in the 
pursuit of any athletics as a means 
of livelihood, 

(iii) sold or pledged his prizes, or 

(iv) promoted or managed an athletic 
contest or exhibition for personal 
gain; 

(b) "amateur", when used in respect of an 
athletic association, club, corporation, 
league or unincorporated organization, 
means that the association, club, corpora- 
tion, league or unincorporated organiza- 
tion is composed of amateurs or is ordinarily 
recognized as being composed of amateurs ; 

(c) "professional", when used in respect of a 
natural person, means a person other than 
an amateur; 

{d) "professional", when used in respect of a 
professional contest or exhibition, means, 

(i) that the participants or contest- 
ants represent or are members of 
an athletic association, club, corpora- 
tion, league or unincorporated orga- 
nization that is composed of profes- 
sionals or is ordinarily recognized 
as being composed of professionals, 



(ii) that the participants or contestants 
are, or represent or are members of, 
a team or group of participants or 
contestants that is professional 
or is ordinarily recognized as being 
professional. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 1. 
revised. 

2. In this Regulation, 

(a) "appearance forfeit" means the amount 
of money that a boxer, under a written 
contract to appear in a professional boxing 
contest or exhibition, agrees to pay in 
accordance with this Regulation upon his 
failure to so appear ; 

(6) "bout" means a contest or exhibition 
between two contestants ; 

(c) "catch- weights" when used in -a profes- 
sional boxing contract means the actual 
weights of the contestants where no mention 
of specific weights is made in the contract ; 

(d) "weight forfeit" means the amount of 
money that a boxer, under a written contract 
to take part in a professional boxing contest 
or exhibition, agrees to pay his opponent 
upon failure to comply with the weight 
requirements under the contract. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 2. 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF THE COMMISSIONER 

3. The Commissioner may issue licences under 
this Regulation and shall, 

(a) assist, promote and encourage, 

(i) amateur sport in community centres 
under The Community Centres Act, 
and 

(ii) associations of amateur sportsmen; 
and 

(6) be responsible for the supervision of pro- 
fessional contests and exhibitions and, 
under the direction and control of the 
Minister, assist in the administration of the 
Act and this Regulation. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 3. 

LICENCES 

4. — (1) Where the Commissioner is of the 
opinion that he should not issue a Hcence, he may 
refuse to issue it. 



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371 



(2) The Commissioner shall not issue a licence 
to a female to take part in an amateur or 
professional boxing or wrestling contest or exhibi- 
tion. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 4. 

5. — (1) Where a person holding a licence fails 
to comply with any provision of the Act or this 
Regulation, the Commissioner may fine him an 
amount not exceeding $50 or suspend his 
licence, or both. 

(2) Where a person holding a licence contravenes 
the Act or this Regulation, the Commissioner 
may, after a hearing, cancel the licence. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 5. 

6. The fees for licences are payable to the 
Minister and shall be collected by the Commis- 
sioner. O. Reg. 26/67. s. 6. 



PART I 

AMATEUR BOXING 

7. This Part applies to amateur boxing contests 
and exhibitions. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 7. 

8. In this Part, "competition" means a contest 
in which more than two boxers take part. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 8. 

9. The weight-classes in amateur boxing are, 

(a) fiy- weight of not more than 112 pounds, 
6 ounces, 15 drams ; 

(b) bantam-weight of more than 112 pounds, 
6 ounces, 15 drams, but not more than 
119 pounds, ounces, 12 drams; 

(c) feather-weight of more than 119 pounds, 
ounces, 12 drams, but not more than 
125 pounds, 10 ounces, 9 drams; 

(d) light-weight of more than 125 pounds, 
10 ounces, 9 drams, but not more than 
132 pounds, 4 ounces, 7 drams ; 

(e) light welter-weight of more than 132 
pounds, 4 ounces, 7 drams, but not more 
than 139 pounds, 15 ounces, 14 drams; 

if) welter-weight of more than 139 pounds, 
15 ounces, 14 drams, but not more than 
147 pounds, 11 ounces, 5 drams; 

(g) light middle-weight of more than 147 
pounds, 11 ounces, 5 drams, but not more 
than 156 pounds, 8 ounces, 7 drams; 

{h) middle-weight of more than 156 pounds, 
8 ounces, 7 drams, but not more than 
165 pounds, 5 ounces, 8 drams ; 



(t) light heavy-weight of more than 165 
pounds, 5 ounces, 8 drams, but not more 
than 178 pounds, 9 ounces, 3 drams; and 

ij) heavy-weight of more than 178 pounds, 
9 ounces, 3 drams. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 9. 

10. — (1) In championship contests there shall 
be three three-minute rounds. 

(2) In other contests or in exhibitions there shall 
be three two-minute rounds or five two-minute 
rounds. 

(3) There shall be a one-minute interval between 
rounds. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 10. 

11. — (1) Except under a licence in Form 1, no 
person shall hold an amateur boxing contest or 
exhibition. 

(2) The fee for the licence is $5. 

(3) The licence is valid only for the contest or 
exhibition specified therein. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 11. 

12. A person holding a licence in Form 1 shall 
make a report in Form 2 to the Commissioner not 
later than ten days after the contest or exhibition 
is held. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 12. 

13. — (1) Except under a licence in Form 3, 
no person shall take part in an amateur boxing 
contest or exhibition. 

(2) No fee is payable for a licence in Form 3. 

(3) The licence expires with the 31st day of 
March next following the date of issue. 

(4) Where a licensee takes part in a contest or 
exhibition, he shall not take part in another 
contest or exhibition for at least three days. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 13. 

14. — (1) No person shall referee an amateur 
boxing contest or exhibition except under a licence 
in Form 4. 

(2) The fee for the licence is $1. 

(3) The licence expires with the 31st day of March 
next following the date of issue. 

(4) No person shall be granted a licence in Form 4 
unless he passes a medical examination conducted by 
a legally qualified medical practitioner. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 14. 

15. Where the Commissioner considers it neces- 
sary in the interests of organized sport, he may order 
any amateur boxing contest or exhibition to be 
stopped and every person holding, officiating at or 
taking part in the contest or exhibition shall 
obey the order. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 15. 



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ATHLETICS CONTROL 



Reg. 65 



16. — (1) A boxer who enters an amateur boxing 
contest or exhibition shall weigh in not sooner than 
six hours or later than one hour before the 
contest or exhibition begins, but during this 
period he may weigh in more than once. 

(2) The boxer shall weigh in in boxing attire 
without gloves or in the nude. 

(3) Where a competition lasts more than one 
day, boxers who have not been eliminated shall 
weigh in once only on each day after the first 
day. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 16. 

17. — (1) A boxer in an amateur boxing contest 
or exhibition shall take a medical examination 
conducted by a legally qualified medical practitioner 
at the time of the weighing-in. 

(2) A boxer in a competition shall take a 
medical examination conducted by a legally quali- 
fied medical practitioner each day of the competition 
at the time of the weighing-in. 

(3) Where the boxer is unable to pass the 
examination, he shall not take part in the contest, 
exhibition or competition. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 17. 

18. — (1) The medical practitioner conducting 
the examination under section 17 or a substitute 
appointed by the Commissioner shall be in attend- 
ance at the contest, exhibition or competition. 

(2) The medical practitioner shall not enter the 
ring unless the referee requests him to do so. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 18. 

19. — (1) Where there are more than four boxers 
in a competition, the draw shall be so arranged 
that the number of boxers remaining after the first 
series is four or a multiple thereof. 

(2) Boxers shall each draw a number by lot 
at the time of the weighing-in, and the byes shall be 
the high numbers. 

(3) Boxers drawing byes shall not take part in 
the first series. 

(4) Boxers drawing byes shall take part in 
the second series before those who have taken part 
in the first series. 

(5) There shall be only one draw and each 
.boxer shall retain his number until the end of the 

competition. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 19. 

20. A boxer in a competition shall not take 
part in more than three bouts a day. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 20. 

21. — (1) A boxer may have one or two seconds. 



(2) Where a boxer has two seconds, he shall 
designate one as chief second and the other as 
assistant second. 

(3) The chief second is responsible for the 
conduct of the assistant second. 

(4) A boxer is responsible for the conduct of his 
seconds. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 21. 

22. Subject to subsection 1 of section 25 no person 
other than a second shall be in a boxer's corner 
between rounds. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 22. 

23. A second shall, 

{a) wear a clean white jersey, sweater or 
shirt ; and 

{b) during a round remain seated and silent 
outside the ropes and the apron but near 
the corner of his charge. O. Reg. 26/67, 
s. 23. 

24. — (1) The chief second shall not enter the 
ring until the bell or gong indicates the end 
of a round. 

(2) When the chief time-keeper's whistle sounds, 
the seconds shall leave the ring and its apron and 
take with them their buckets, stools and equip- 
ment. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 24. 

25. — (1) Between rounds the chief second may, 

{a) enter the ring and attend his charge; and 

(b) request the referee to, 

(i) visit his corner to discuss any point 
relevant to the bout, 

(ii) comment on any injury to his charge, 

(iii) have the medical practitioner in 
attendance examine his charge, or 

(iv) stop the bout. 

(2) Between rounds the assistant second may 
attend his charge but in doing so shall remain 
outside the ropes on the apron of the ring. 

(3) Notwithstanding clause a of section 26, the 
chief second may instruct the referee to stop the 
bout and concede defeat for his boxer at any time. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 25. 

26. During a round a second shall not, 

(a) interfere in any way with the progress 
of the bout ; 

(6) give any advice, assistance or encourage- 
ment to his charge ; or 



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ATHLETICS CONTROL 



373 



(c) throw anything into the ring, 

and, if he does so, his charge may be warned or 
disquahfied by the referee. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 26. 

27. Where a second violates any of the pro- 
visions of sections 16 to 48, the referee may order 
him to leave the ring or the premises where the 
bout is being held, and may direct that he cease 
to act as a second during that bout. O. Reg. 26/67, 
s. 27. 

28. — (1) A boxer shall be on the premises where 
the contest or exhibition is to be held at least 
one hour before the time scheduled for the com- 
mencement of the bout in which he is taking part. 

(2) Where a boxer does not comply with 
subsection 1, the Commissioner may disqualify him. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 28. 

29. — (1) Subject to subsection 2, no boxer shall 
use grease or vasehne or any substance that 
might handicap or injure his opponent. 

(2) A boxer may use a Hght appHcation of 
grease or vaseline on his eyebrows and the bridge 
of his nose and behind his ears. O. Reg. 26/67, 
s. 29. 

30. — (1) There shall be a chief time-keeper and 
a knock-down time-keeper, each equipped with 
a stop-watch. 

(2) The chief time-keeper shall, 

(a) sit immediately outside the ring close to 
a bell or gong ; 

(6) have a whistle that can be heard distinctly 
by the boxers ; 

(c) ten seconds before the end of each interval 
between rounds, blow his whistle; 

(d) at the end of ten seconds indicate the 
beginning of the round by ringing the bell 
or striking the gong but only where the 
seconds have left the ring and taken with 
them their buckets, stools and equipment ; 

{e) at the end of each round ring the bell or 
strike the gong ; and 

(/) where the referee orders the boxers to stop 
and then to box, extend the time of the 
round in accordance with instructions from 
the referee. 

(3) Where a boxer is down, the knock-down 
time-keeper shall immediately stand up and, upon 
the referee calHng "one", indicate aloud and by 
waving one arm the additional seconds as they 
elapse according to his stop-watch. 



(4) Where a boxer is knocked out, the time- 
keeper shall advise the master of ceremonies of the 
round in which the knock-out took place and the 
part of the round that had elapsed. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 30. 

31. There shall be an examiner who shall, 

(a) superintend the putting on of bandages and 
gloves ; and 

{b) examine the protection cup of each boxer 
to ensure it is of the proper type. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 31. 

32. There shall be a master of ceremonies who 
shall, 

(a) ensure that equipment necessary for the 
contest or exhibition is available ; 

{b) take such action as is necessary to have 
the boxers ready for the bout in which they 
are to take part ; 

(c) at the beginning of the bout, introduce 
the boxers to the spectators, announce 
their names and weights, and the length and 
other particulars of the bout ; 

{d) before a round begins, announce or other- 
wise indicate to the spectators the number 
of that round ; 

{e) at the end of the bout, 

(i) obtain first the stub of the referee's 
score-card and then the stubs of 
the judges' score-cards, and 
(ii) announce the result of the bout ; and 

if) make no other announcements except 
those authorized or directed by the Com- 
missioner. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 32. 

33. — (1) There shall be a referee and two or 
three judges for a bout. 

(2) The judges shall be seated outside the ring, 
each on a different side thereof and at least six 
feet from the spectators. 

(3) The referee and judges shall be neutral and 
function independently of each other. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 33. 

34. Before a bout begins the referee shall 
ascertain the names of the chief seconds, call the 
boxers and their chief seconds to the centre of the 
ring, issue instructions as to the conduct of the 
bout and direct the boxers to return to their corners 
and upon the time-keeper's signal to go to the 
centre of the ring, touch gloves and begin the bout. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 34. 



374 



ATHLETICS CONTROL 



Reg. 65 



35. — (1) During a round the boxers and referee 
shall be the only persons permitted in the ring. 

(2) The referee shall, 

(a) require the boxers and their seconds to 
observe the provisions of sections 16 to 48; 
and 

(b) warn or disqualify a boxer or his second 
who violates any provision of sections 16 
to 48. 

(3) The referee shall use three words of command 
to boxers, as follows : 

1. To stop the bout, "stop". 

2. To instruct them to continue, "box". 

3. When breaking a chnch, "break". 

(4) Upon the command "break" the boxers 
shall step back one full pace before continuing to 
box. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 35. 

36. — (1) The result of a bout shall be determined 
by the referee and two judges, or by three judges. 

(2) A judge, or a referee acting as a judge, shall, 

(a) determine the winner and loser of each 
round by a system of points scored in accord- 
ance with section 41 ; 

(b) immediately a round is completed, record 
on a score-card the points awarded each 
boxer in that round ; 

(c) when the bout ends, total the number of 
points awarded each boxer and on the stub 
of the score-card write the name of the boxer 
to whom he has awarded the greater number 
of points ; 

(d) sign the score-card and stub, and hand 
the stub to the master of ceremonies; and 

{e) within twenty-four hours after the bout, 
transmit his score-card to the Commis- 
sioner. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 36. 

37. — (1) A boxer may win a bout, 

(a) by a knock-out ; 

(6) by an accident to his opponent ; 

(c) through the disqualification of his opponent ; 

or 
{d) on points. 

(2) In competitions a winner shall be declared 
in every bout. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 37. 



38. Subject to section 39, when a boxer, 

(a) touches the floor of the ring for ten 
seconds or more with any part of his body 
other than his feet ; 

(b) hangs unconscious on the ropes; or 

(c) in the opinion of the referee, is at any 
time incapable of continuing or is outclassed, 

he shall be deemed to be knocked out. O. Reg. 26/67, 
S.38. 

39. — (1) Where in the opinion of the referee a 
boxer is incapable of continuing the bout because 
of a cut near the eye, the referee shall, 

(a) stop the bout ; and 

(b) if the cut was, 

(i) caused by a blow, award the deci- 
sion to the boxer dehvering the blow, 

(ii) caused by an intentional butt, award 
the decision to the in j ured boxer after 
disqualifying his opponent, or 

(iii) accidental, subject to subsection 2, 
declare the bout a draw. 

(2) Where the bout is in a competition and in the 
opinion of the referee a boxer is incapable of con- 
tinuing because of an accidental cut near the eye, 
the referee shall stop the bout and award the decision 
to the boxer with the greater number of points. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 39. 

40. — (1) A boxer shall be deemed to be down 
when he, 

(a) touches the floor of the ring with any part 
of his body other than his feet ; 

{b) is hanging over the ropes in a helpless 
manner and the referee so indicates and 
begins to count ; or 

(c) is knocked through the ropes but not off 
the ring apron. 

(2) When a boxer is down, his opponent shall at 
once go to a neutral corner, and thereupon the 
referee shall call aloud at one-second intervals 
"one", "two", "three", "four", "five", "six", 
"seven", "eight", "nine", "out", as the knock- 
down time-keeper indicates the seconds as they 
elapse. 

(3) Where a boxer is knocked down, he shall not 
rise before the count of eight. 

(4) Where the boxer rises before the referee calls 
"out", the referee shall stop counting, call aloud 
"box" and thereupon the bout shall continue. 



Reg. 65 



ATHLETICS CONTROL 



375 



(5) Where a boxer is down and his opponent 
leaves the neutral corner while the referee is 
counting, the referee shall stop counting and resume 
where he left off when the opponent is again in the 
neutral corner. 

(6) Where a boxer who has been down rises 
before the referee calls "out", but falls without 
again being hit by his opponent, the referee shall 
resume counting where he left off. 

(7) Where the boxers go down at the same time, the 
referee shall continue to count until both of them 
rise or until he calls "out", whichever happens 
sooner. 

(8) When the boxers are both counted out, the 
referee shall stop the bout and the decision shall be 
given in accordance with the points awarded before 
the count began. 

(9) Where a boxer fails to resume the bout 
immediately after the interval between rounds, the 
referee shall count as if the boxer were down. 

(10) Where a boxer is knocked down and while the 
referee is counting the bell or gong indicates the end 
of the round, the referee shall, 

(a) stop counting where the round is the last 
round of the bout ; or 

(b) continue to count, where the round is not 
the last round of the bout, until he calls 
"out" or the boxer rises, whichever hap- 
pens sooner. 

(11) Where a boxer is knocked through the 
ropes and out of the ring, he shall be given 
eighteen seconds to re-enter the ring. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 40. 

41. — (1) At the end of a round, the boxer 
making the better showing shall receive five points 
and his opponent shall receive fewer than five points, 
the number to be determined by his showing. 

(2) Where a round is even, each boxer shall receive 
five points. 

(3) Where, at the end of a bout in a competi- 
tion, the boxers have an equal number of points, 
the decision shall be given to the boxer who has 
been the aggressor or who has shown the better 
style. 

(4) In awarding points the referee and judges shall 
take into consideration, 

{a) the number of correct hits landed in 
accordance with section 42 ; 

{b) a defence that prevents blows from landing 
and the attack of the opponent from 
being successful ; and 



(c) aggressiveness and tactics. 

(5) Where the referee warns a boxer for a foul, 
the referee and judges shall award points to the 
other boxer. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 41. 

42. — (1) The judges, and the referee when acting 
as a judge, shall award points for a direct hit with 
the knuckle part of the closed glove on any part 
of the front or side of the head or body above 
the belt. 

(2) No points shall be awarded for blows landing 
on the arms of an opponent. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 42. 

43. — (1) In sections 16 to 48, "foul" means, 

{a) holding or hitting below the belt ; 

{b) tripping, kicking or butting; 

(c) hitting with the head, shoulder, forearm 
or elbow; 

{d) choking; 

{e) pressing an arm or elbow in the face 
of the opponent ; 

(/) pressing the head of the opponent back 
over the ropes ; 

{g) hitting with an open glove or the inside 
of a glove ; 

(h) hitting with a wrist or the side of a hand; 

{i) a back-hand blow ; 

{j) a blow landing on the neck of back of the 
opponent ; 

(k) a kidney punch ; 

(/) a pivot blow; 

(w) attacking when holding or using the ropes 
in any manner ; 

(«) wrestling, lying on or throwing in the clinch ; 

(o) attacking an opponent who is down; 

(P) clinching, holding or locking of the 
opponent's arm or head ; 

(q) holding and hitting, pulhng and hitting, 
or hitting on the break ; 

(r) ducking below the belt of the opponent; 

(s) completely passive defence by covering up 
and intentionally failing to avoid a blow ; or 

(/) rebuking an opponent, or aggressive or 
offensive utterances during the round. 



376 



ATHLETICS CONTROL 



Reg. 65 



(2) When a boxer states he has been fouled and 
that he is unable to continue, the referee shall stop 
the bout and disqualify the other boxer, 

(a) if he has seen the foul committed; and 

(6) if in his opinion the boxer is unable to 
continue because of the foul. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 43. 



44.— (1) Where a boxer, 

(a) does not obey the instructions of the referee ; 

(b) violates any provision of sections 16 to 48; 

(c) acts in an unsportsmanlike manner; or 
{d) commits a foul, 

the referee may warn or disqualify him. 

(2) Where after receiving two warnings a boxer 
violates subsection 1, the referee shall thereupon 
disquahfy him. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 44. 

45. Subject to section 46, the decision, 

(a) of the judges; or 

(b) of the judges and the referee when acting 
as a judge, 

as to the winner of a bout is final. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 45. 

46. — (1) An appeal against a decision may be 
made by a boxer only on the grounds that the 
score-sheets have been added incorrectly or that 
there has been an incorrect announcement of the 
result of the bout. 

(2) The appeal shall be made to the Commis- 
sioner no more than twenty-four hours after the 
bout ends. 

(3) The decision of the Commissioner is final. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 46. 



47. When the bell or gong indicates the end of the 
bout, the boxers shall, 

(a) immediately return to their corners and 
await the announcement of the result 
of the bout ; and 

(b) when the announcement is given, shake 
hands. O. Reg. 26/67. s. 47. 

48. A boxer who has been knocked out during 
a bout shall be suspended from boxing for thirty days 
after the bout. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 48. 



EQUIPMENT 

49. There shall be a ring not less than sixteen 
feet square or more than twenty feet square. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 49. 

50. — (1) The floor of the ring shall, 

(a) extend beyond the ropes at least eighteen 
inches ; and 

{b) be padded with felt or other soft material 
at least one and one-half inches thick and 
covered with canvas. 

(2) The portion of the floor of the ring outside 
the ropes is called the "apron". O. Reg. 26/67. s. 50. 

51. — (1) There shall be three ropes each at least 
three-quarters of an inch in diameter, and fixed 
securely to posts at each corner of the ring. 

(2) One of the posts shall be red and the post 
diagonally opposite it shall be blue. 

(3) The ropes shall be two, three and four feet, 
respectively, above the floor of the ring. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 51. 

52. — (1) There shall be a bell or gong of sufficient 
volume that when rung or sounded it can be heard 
distinctly by the boxers and officials. 

(2) Where a gong is used, it shall be attached 
securely to the ring or to some other suitable object 
close at hand. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 52. 



53. — (1) A boxer shall wear gloves each weighing 
at least ten ounces. 

(2) The padding of gloves shall be unbroken. 

(3) The laces shall be tied on the outside of the 
back of the wrist of the gloves. O. Reg. 26/67, 
s. 53. 



54. — ( 1 ) A boxer may wrap on each hand not more 
than eight feet of soft cloth bandage not more than two 
inches wide. 

(2) The boxer may use a sufficient amount of 
surgeon's adhesive tape to hold the bandage in place. 

(3) The adhesive tape shall not be applied across 
the knuckles or be more than one inch wide. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 54. 

55. — (1) A boxer may wear gum-shields. 

(2) A boxer shall wear a protection cup. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 55. 

56. — (1) A boxer shall wear. 



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ATHLETICS CONTROL 



377 



{a) clean, neat trunks, other than tights, ex- 
tending from a point not above the navel to 
a point not higher than half-way between 
the knees and the crotch ; and 

(b) shoes of soft material and without heels, 
cleats, spikes or hard soles. 

(2) The trunks of opposing boxers shall be of 
contrasting colours. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 56. 

57. The person holding the contest or exhibition 
shall provide boxers with resin suitable for application 
to their shoes. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 57. 



PART II 

PROFESSIONAL BOXING 

58. This Part applies to professional boxing 
contests and exhibitions. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 58. 

59. The weight-classes in professional boxing con- 
tests and exhibitions are, 

(a) fiy-weight of not more than 112 pounds; 

{b) bantam-weight of from 113 to 118 pounds, 
both inclusive ; 

(c) feather-weight of from 119 to 126 pounds, 
both inclusive ; 

{d) light-weight of from 127 to 135 pounds, 
both inclusive ; 

{e) welter-weight of from 136 to 147 pounds, 
both inclusive ; 

(/) middle-weight of from 148 to 160 pounds, 
both inclusive ; 

(g) light heavy-weight of from 161 to 175 
pounds, both inclusive ; and 

{h) heavy-weight of over 175 pounds. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 59. 

60. — (1) A person eighteen years of age or under 
shall not take part in a professional boxing contest or 
exhibition. 

(2) A person nineteen years of age shall not take 
part in a professional boxing contest or exhibition of 
more than eight three-minute rounds. 

(3) Except with the approval of the Commissioner, 
a person twenty years of age or over shall not take 
part in a professional boxing contest or exhibition of 
more than ten three-minute rounds. 

(4) There shall be a one-minute interval between 
rounds. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 60. 



61. Except under a licence in Form 8 or Form 9, 
no person shall hold a professional boxing contest or 
exhibition. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 61. 

62. A licence in Form 8 shall be issued for the hold- 
ing of professional boxing contests and exhibitions in a 
city having a population of at least 500,000 according 
to the last revised assessment roll and, 

{a) is valid only in the city specified in the 
licence ; 

(6) shall be known as a Professional Boxing 
Licence Class 1 ; and 

(c) expires with the 31st day of March next 
following the date of issue. O. Reg. 26/67, 
s. 62. 

63. — (1) An application for a Professional Boxing 
Licence Class 1 shall be made to the Commissioner in 
Form 10 on or before the 31st day of March in the year 
for which the application is made. 

(2) The fee for the licence is $500. 0. Reg. 
26/67, s. 63. 

64. Where more than one Professional Boxing 
Licence Class 1 is issued for the same city, the Com- 
missioner may require the licensees to furnish him 
with a list setting forth the dates when and places 
where they propose holding professional boxing 
contests and exhibitions. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 64. 

65. — (1) A hcence in Form 9 shall be issued for the 
holding of a professional boxing contest or exhibition 
in a municipality having a population under 500,000 
according to the last revised assessment roll, and, 

{a) is vaUd only for the contest or exhibition 
specified in the licence ; and 

{b) shall be known as a Professional Boxing 
Licence Class 2. 

(2) The fee for the licence is $5. O. Reg. 26/67, 
s. 65. 

66. — (1) Except under a licence in Form 11, no 
person shall take part in a professional boxing contest 
or exhibition. 



(2) An application for the licence shall be in Form 



12. 



(3) The fee for the licence is |5. 

(4) The licence expires with the 31st day of March 
next following the date of issue. 

(5) No person who is a resident of Ontario shall be 
granted a Hcence in Form 1 1 unless at the time of his 
original application for the licence he undergoes an 
electroencephalographic examination . 



378 



ATHLETICS CONTROL 



Reg. 65 



(6) The Commissioner may require any applicant 
for a licence in Form 11 to undergo an electroence- 
phalographic examination. 

(7) A person who is resident outside Ontario shall 
not be granted a licence in Form 11 unless at the 
time of his original application for the licence he 
presents a subsisting licence issued by the juris- 
diction in which he resides that entitles him to 
box in that jurisdiction. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 66, revised. 

67. — (1) Except under a licence in Form 13, no 
person shall manage a professional boxer. 

(2) A hcence in Form 13 shall not be issued to a 
person holding a licence in Form 8 or Form 9. 

(3) The fee for a licence in Form 13 is $5 and the 
licence expires with the 31st day of March next 
following the date of issue. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 67. 

68. — (1) A contract between a professional boxer 
and his manager shall be in Form 14. 

(2) A contract between a professional boxer and a 
person holding a professional boxing contest or exhibi- 
tion shall be in Form 15. 

(3) Contracts shall be read and construed in 
accordance with the Act and this Regulation and are 
subject to the provisions of each of them. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 68. 

69. — (1) Except under a licence in Form 16, no 
person shall referee a professional boxing contest or 
exhibition. 

(2) The fee for the licence is $2 for each professional 
boxing contest or exhibition. 

(3) No person shall be granted a licence in Form 16 
unless he passes a medical examination conducted by 
a legally qualified medical practitioner. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 69. 

70. — (1) Subject to subsection 4, no person shall 
act as a second at a professional boxing contest or 
exhibition except under a licence in Form 17. 

(2) The fee for the licence is $2. 

(3) The licence expires with the 31st day of March 
next following the date of issue. 

(4) Where a person holds a licence in Form 13, 
he may, without holding a licence under subsection 1 , 
act as a second at any professional boxing contest or 
exhibition in which a boxer managed by him takes 
part. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 70. 



71. — (1) A person holding a professional boxing 
contest or exhibition shall, 



(a) at least seven days before the date of the 
contest or exhibition deposit with the Com- 
missioner security in an amount equal to the 
total of, 

(i) the purses or other remuneration to 
be paid boxers and, where one or 
more boxers are to be paid a per- 
centage of the gross receipts, the 
estimated amount thereof, and 

(ii) the fees payable to officials appointed 
for the contest or exhibition ; 

(b) at least seven days before the date of the 
contest or exhibition transmit to the Com- 
missioner contracts of the boxers in the 
main bout, in Form 14 and Form 15; and 

(c) at least three days before the date of the 
contest or exhibition transmit to the Com- 
missioner contracts of the boxers in the other 
bouts, in Form 14 and Form 15. 

(2) The security shall be in the form of, 

(a) money ; or 

ib) direct or guaranteed securities of the 
Government of Canada or Ontario, payable 
to bearer. 

(3) Where the person holding the contest or 
exhibition does not make the payments referred to in 
subclauses i and ii of clause a of subsection 1 within 
ten days after the contest or exhibition, the security 
is forfeited. 

(4) Where the security is forfeited and is not in 
the form of money, the Commissioner shall sell the 
security within ten days of the forfeiture. 

(5) Where the security is forfeited, or forfeited 
and sold, the Commissioner shall, 

(a) use part or all of it to make the payments 
referred to in subclauses i and ii of clause a 
of subsection 1 ; and 

{b) refund any balance to the holder of the 
licence. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 71. 

72. — (1) A person holding a professional boxing 
contest or exhibition shall, 

(a) furnish the equipment required under this 
Regulation ; 

(6) furnish each boxer with a stool, bucket, 
bandages and a pair of boxing gloves ; 

(c) provide proper facilities for making an- 
nouncements that can be heard or seen 
clearly by the spectators ; 



Reg. 65 



ATHLETICS CONTROL 



379 



(d) provide a separate room for use only by the 
Commissioner, referees and judges ; 

{e) ensure that the contest or exhibition is begun 
at the time advertised and conducted 
throughout in an orderly manner and with- 
out unnecessary delay ; and 

{/) make a report in Form 18 to the Commis- 
sioner not later than ten days after the 
contest or exhibition is held. 

(2) A person holding a professional boxing contest 
or exhibition may pay a boxer his expenses but shall 
not pay the boxer for his services until after the 
contest or exhibition. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 72, revised. 

73. — (1) Where the Commissioner fines a boxer, 
the person holding the professional boxing contest or 
exhibition shall, 

(a) retain the amount of the fine out of the purse 
or other remuneration of the boxer ; and 

{b) be deemed to be a person who has received 
money for the Crown and for which he is 
accountable within the meaning of The 
Financial Administration Act. 

(2) The boxer has no claim for the amount retained 
under subsection 1. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 73. 

74. A person shall not have any financial interest 
in a boxer taking part in a professional boxing contest 
or exhibition held on premises owned or leased by 
that person or in which he is otherwise interested. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 74. 

75. No person shall advertise a professional boxing 
contest or exhibition unless the contracts of the boxers 
taking part in the main bout, in Form 14 and Form 15, 
have been approved by the Commissioner. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 75. 

76. — (1) A boxer under contract to take part in a 
professional boxing contest or exhibition shall weigh 
in, in the nude, at 2 o'clock in the afternoon on the day 
of the contest or exhibition at a place designated by 
the Commissioner. 

(2) Where, after the weighing-in, the contest or 
exhibition is postponed more than twenty-four hours, 
the boxer shall again weigh in on the day of the 
contest or exhibition. 

(3) Where the boxer is overweight, he shall be 
allowed an hour to bring himself within the weight 
required by his contract. 

(4) Where the boxer remains overweight, the 
Commissioner shall direct the contest or exhibition 
to be held unless he considers the difference in weight 
between the boxers to be too great for a fair contest or 
proper exhibition. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 76. 



77.— (1) Subject to subsection 4, a boxer under 
contract to take part in a professional boxing contest 
or exhibition shall take a medical examination im- 
mediately after the weighing-in. 

(2) Where the contest or exhibition is postponed 
more than twenty-four hours, the boxer shall take a 
medical examination on the day of the contest or 
exhibition. 

(3) Where the boxer is unable to pass the examina- 
tion or is under the influence of drugs or of liquor as 
defined in The Liquor Control Act, he shall not take 
part in the contest or exhibition. 

(4) Where a Professional Boxing Licence Class 1 
has been issued, a contestant in the main bout shall 
take an additional medical examination not more than 
six days and not less than three days before the 
scheduled bout. 

(5) Where the contestant is unable to pass the 
examination, he shall not take part in the professional 
boxing contest or exhibition. 

(6) A medical examination required by this section 
shall be conducted by a legally quaHfied medical 
practitioner appointed by the Commissioner. O. 
Reg. 26/67, s. 77. 

78. — (1) The medical practitioner conducting the 
examination under section 77 or a substitute 
appointed by the Commissioner shall be in attend- 
ance at the contest or exhibition. 

(2) The medical practitioner shall not enter the 
ring unless the referee requests him to do so. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 78. 

79. Where a boxer under contract to take part in a 
professional boxing contest or exhibition does not 
make the weight required under the contract, his 
opponent is entitled to the weight forfeit set out in the 
contract. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 79. 

80. Where a boxer under contract to take part in 
a professional boxing contest or exhibition, 

{a) fails to pass his medical examination ; 

(b) does not appear for his bout ; or 

(c) appears for his bout but , in the opinion of the 
medical practitioner, is not in a proper 
physical or mental condition to take part 
therein, 

he is not entitled to any purse or other remuneration, 
or expenses not already paid to him. O. Reg. 26/67, 
s. 80. 

81 . — ( 1 ) Where a boxer is unable or refuses to take 
part in a professional boxing contest or exhibition in 
accordance with the terms of his contract, the person 
holding the contest or exhibition shall notify the Com- 
missioner forthwith. 



380 



ATHLETICS CONTROL 



Reg. 65 



(2) At the request of the person holding the pro- 
fessional boxing contest or exhibition, the Com- 
missioner may permit a boxer to substitute for the 
boxer unable or refusing to take part. O. Reg. 
26/67,5.81. 

82. — (1) Where a boxer is unable or refuses to take 
part in a professional boxing contest or exhibition, 
his opponent shall take part against any substitute 
permitted by the Commissioner. 

(2) The substitute shall take a medical examination 
conducted by a legally quahfied medical practitioner 
appointed by the Commissioner. 

(3) The Commissioner shall determine the time 
and place of the examination. O. Reg. 26/67, 
s. 82. 

83. — (1) Where a boxer under contract to take 
part in a professional boxing contest or exhibition fails 
to take part therein, and no substitute is obtained for 
him, his opponent is entitled to, 

(a) the appearance forfeit ; and 

{b) his expenses for travelling to and from and in 
training for the contest or exhibition, to be 
paid by the person holding the contest or 
exhibition. 

(2) When there is a dispute as to the expenses, the 
parties shall refer the matter to the Commissioner for 
settlement and his decision is final. 

(3) When a boxer under contract to take part in a 
professional boxing contest or exhibition fails to take 
part therein and a substitute is obtained, his opponent 
is entitled to the purse , or other remuneration specified 
in the contract, and the person holding the contest or 
exhibition is entitled to the appearance forfeit of the 
boxer who failed to take part. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 83. 

84. Where, 

(a) a boxer is under contract to take part in a 
professional boxing contest or exhibition 
and before it is held takes part in another 
contest or exhibition ; and 

(6) the Commissioner, after an investigation, 
is of the opinion that the boxer has thereby 
lessened his value or efficiency for the 
contest or exhibition specified in the 
contract, 

the Commissioner may void the contract by en- 
dorsing thereon "This contract is void". O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 84. 



85. — (1) A boxer may have one or two seconds. 

(2) Where a boxer has two seconds, he shall 
designate one of them as chief second and the other 
as assistant second. 



(3) The chief second is responsible for the conduct 
of the assistant second. 

(4) A boxer is responsible for the conduct of his 
seconds. 

(5) Subject to subsection 1 of section 88, no person 
other than a second shall be in a boxer's corner between 
rounds. 0. Reg. 26/67, s. 85. 

86. A second shall, 

(a) wear a clean white jersey, sweater or shirt; 
and 

{b) during a round remain seated and silent out- 
side the ropes and the apron but near the 
corner of his charge. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 86. 



87. — (1) The chief second shall not enter the ring 
until the bell or gong indicates the end of a round. 

(2) When the chief time-keeper's whistle sounds, 
the seconds shall leave the ring, and take with them 
their buckets, stools and equipment. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 87. 

88. — (1) Between rounds the chief second may 
request the referee to, 

(a) visit his corner to discuss any point relevant 
to the bout ; 

{b) comment on any injury to his charge; 

(c) have the medical practitioner in attendance 
examine his charge ; or 

{d) stop the bout. 

(2) Between rounds the assistant second may 
attend his charge but in doing so he shall remain out- 
side the ropes on the apron of the ring. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 88. 

89. During a round a second shall not, 

(a) interfere in any way with the progress of the 
bout; 

(b) give any advice, assistance or encourage- 
ment to his charge ; or 

(c) throw anything into the ring. 

and if he does his charge may be warned or dis- 
quahfied by the referee. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 89. 

90. Where a second violates a rule, the referee may 
order his removal from the ring or from the premises 
on which the bout is being held and may direct that he 
cease to act as a second during that bout. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 90. 



Reg. 65 



ATHLETICS CONTROL 



381 



91 . — ( 1 ) A boxer shall be on the premises on which 
the contest or exhibition is to be held at least two hours 
before the time scheduled for the commencement of 
the bout in which he is taking part. 

(2) Where the boxer does not comply with subsec- 
tion 1, the Commissioner may disqualify him. 
O.Reg. 26/67. s. 91. 

92. — (1) Subject to subsection 2, no boxer shall use 
grease or vaseline or any slippery substance that 
might handicap or injure his opponent. 

(2) A boxer may use a light application of grease 
or vaseUne on his eyebrows and the bridge of his nose 
and behind his ears. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 92. 

93.— (1) No boxer shall, 

{a) take part in more than one contest or exhibi- 
tion on the same day ; or 

(b) take part in a contest of ten or more three- 
minute rounds within four days of his last 
contest. 

(2) Where a boxer takes part in a contest or exhibi- 
tion of fewer than ten three-minute rounds, he shall 
not take part in any other contest or exhibition for 
three days. 

(3) A boxer who has been knocked out during a 
bout shall be suspended from boxing for thirty days 
after the bout. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 93. 

94. — (1) The following are major fouls: 

1 . Hitting below the belt. 

2. Hitting an opponent who is down or rising 
from a down. 

3. Butting with the head or shoulder. 

4. Kicking, tripping, hacking or gouging. 

5. Striking on or over the kidneys or on the 
back of the neck. 

6. Striking a pivot blow or half-pivot blow. 

7. Any physical action, other than fair boxing, 
that might injure an opponent. 

(2) Disobeying the referee shall be deemed to be a 
major foul. 

(3) The following are minor fouls : 

1 . Holding or maintaining a clinch. 

2. Hitting while only one arm is free. 

3. Hitting or scraping with the inside of the 
glove, wrist or elbow. 



4. Hitting or flicking with an open glove. 

5. Purposely going down without being hit. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 94. 

95. — (1) A boxer shall be deemed to be down when 



{a) touches the floor of the ring with any part of 
his body other than this feet ; 

(b) is hanging over the ropes in a helpless 
manner, and when the referee so indicates 
and begins the count ; or 

(c) is rising from a down position. 

(2) When a boxer is down, his opponent shall at 
once go to a neutral corner and thereupon the referee 
shall call aloud at one-second intervals "one", "two", 
"three", "four", "five", "six", "seven", "eight", 
"nine", "out", as the knock-down time-keeper 
indicates the seconds as they elapse. 

(3) Where a boxer is knocked down, he shall not 
rise before the count of eight. 

(4) When the referee calls "out", he shall raise his 
hands over his head and declare the boxer in the 
neutral corner to be the winner by a knock-out. 

(5) Where a boxer is down and his opponent 
leaves the neutral corner while the referee is counting, 
the referee shall stop counting and resume where he 
left ofi only when the opponent is again in the 
neutral corner. 

(6) Where a boxer who has been knocked down or 
through the ropes rises before the referee calls "out", 
but falls without again being hit by his opponent, the 
referee shall resume counting where he left off. 

(7) Where the boxers go down at the same time, 
the referee shall continue to count until both of them 
get up or until he calls "out", whichever happens 
sooner. 

(8) When the boxers are both counted out, the 
referee shall stop the bout and the decision shall be 
given in accordance with the points awarded before 
the count began. 

(9) Where a boxer fails to resume boxing im- 
mediately after the interval between rounds, the 
referee shall count as if the boxer were down. 

(10) Where a boxer is knocked down and while 
the referee is counting the bell or gong indicates the 
end of the round, the referee shall, 

(a) stop counting where the round is the last 
round of the bout ; or 

{h) continue to count, where the round is not 
the last round of the bout, until he calls 
"out" or the boxer rises, whichever happens 
sooner. 



382 



ATHLETICS CONTROL 



Reg. 65 



(11) Where a boxer is knocked through the ropes 
and out of the ring, he shall be given eighteen seconds 
to re-enter the ring. New. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 95. 

96. Where a boxer is down through accident or 
weakness, he shall rise immediately, but, where he is 
knocked down, he shall not rise before the count of 
eight. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 96. 

97. Where a boxer, 

{a) touches the floor of the ring for ten seconds 
or more with any part of his body other than 
his feet ; 

(6) hangs unconscious on the ropes ; or 

(c) in the opinion of the referee is at any time 
incapable of continuing or is outclassed, 

he shall be deemed to be knocked out. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 97. 

98. Where, in the opinion of the referee, a boxer 
is incapable of continuing the bout because of a cut 
near the eye, the referee shall, 

(a) stop the bout ; and 

{b) if the cut was, 

(i) caused by a blow, award the decision 
to the boxer delivering the blow, 

(ii) caused by an intentional butt, award 
the decision to the in j ured boxer after 
disqualifying his opponent, or 

(iii) accidental, declare the bout a draw. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 98. 

99. — (1) There shall be a chief timekeeper and 
knock-down timekeeper, each equipped with a stop- 
watch. 

(2) The chief timekeeper shall, 

(a) sit outside the ring close to a bell or gong ; 

(6) have a whitle that can be heard clearly 
by the boxers ; 

(c) ten seconds before the end of each interval 
between rounds blow his whistle ; 

{d) at the end of ten seconds indicate the 
beginning of the round by ringing the bell 
or striking the gong but only where the 
seconds have left the ring and taken with 
them their buckets, stools and equip- 
ment ; and 

{e) at the end of each round ring the bell or 
strike the gong. 



(3) Where a boxer is down, the knock-down time- 
keeper shall immediately stand up and, upon the 
reveree calling "one" indicate aloud and by waving 
one arm the additional seconds as they elapse 
according to his stop-watch. 

(4) Where a boxer is knocked out, the timekeeper 
shall advise the master of ceremonies of the round in 
which the knock-out took place and the part of the 
round that has elapsed. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 99. 

100. There shall be an examiner who shall, 

{a) superintend the putting-on of bandages and 
gloves ; and 

{b) examine the protection cup of each boxer to 
ensure it is of the proper type. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 100. 

101. There shall be a master of ceremonies who 
shall, 

{a) ensure that equipment necessary for the 
contest or exhibition is available ; 

{b) take such action as is necessary to have the 
boxers ready for the contest or exhibition in 
which they are to take part ; 

(c) at the beginning of the contest or exhibition, 
introduce the boxers to the spectators, 
announce their names and weights, and the 
length and other particulars of the contest or 
exhibition ; 

{d) before a round begins, announce or otherwise 
indicate to the spectators the number of 
that round ; 

{e) at the end of the bout, 

(i) obtain first the slip of the referee and 
then the slips of the judges, and 

(ii) announce the result of the bout; 

(/) make no other announcements except those 
authorized or directed by the Commissioner ; 
and 

ig) transmit the sHps to the Commissioner 
forthwith. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 101. 

102. — (1) There shall be two judges seated outside 
the ring on opposite sides thereof and at least six feet 
from the spectators. 

(2) A judge shall, 

(a) determine the winner and loser of each round 
by a system of points scored in accordance 
with section 103; 



Reg. 65 



ATHLETICS CONTROL 



383 



(b) record on a score-sheet points awarded 
boxers in each round ; 

(c) at the end of the contest, total the number of 
points awarded each boxer and on a shp of 
paper write, 

(i) the name of the boxer awarded the 
greater number of points, or 

(ii) the word "draw" where each boxer 
has been awarded the same number 
of points, 

and hand the shp to the master of 
ceremonies ; and 

{d) within twenty-four hours after the contest, 
transmit the score-sheet to the Com- 
missioner. 



(3) Where the judges are agreed upon a winner, 
their decision is final. 



(4) Where the judges name different winners, or 
one judge names a winner and the other calls the bout 
a draw, the referee shall determine the result of the 
contest. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 102. 

103. — (1) The winner of a round shall be awarded 
five points and the loser the number of points to which 
he is entitled in accordance with subsections 3 and 4. 



(2) Where a round is even, 
awarded five points. 



each boxer shall be 



(3) A boxer shall be given credit for, 

(a) clean, forceful blows on any part of his 
opponent's head or on the front of his op- 
ponent's body above the belt, according to 
the damaging effect of the blows ; 

(ft) aggressiveness; 

(c) forcing the fight with skilful attack; 

(d) cleverness in avoiding or blocking blows ; 

{e) cleverness in preventing his opponent from 
landing a blow ; 

(/) ring generalship, including the ability to 
take advantage of opportunities to cope with 
situations as they arise, to foresee and 
neutrahze his opponent's method of attack 
and to force his opponent to adopt a style 
at which he is not skilful or which is to his 
disadvantage ; 

(g) the art of boxing as distinct from mere 
fighting ; and 



(A) sportsmanship in the ring, including adher- 
ence to the spirit of the provisions of sections 
85 to 111 and refraining from taking any 
unfair advantage of his opponent. 

(4) A boxer shall have points deducted for, 

(a) persistently delaying a contest by chnching, 
holding, or lacking in aggressiveness; and 

(6) committing an intentional or unintentional 
foul not sufficiently serious to warrant his 
disqualification. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 103. 



104. Before a contest or exhibition begins the 
referee shall, 

(a) ascertain the names of the chief seconds; 
and 

{b) call the boxers and seconds to the centre of 
the ring and give instructions for the conduct 
of the contest or exhibition. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 104. 



105. — (1) During a round the referee and boxers 
shall be the only persons in the ring. 

(2) Where a person violates subsection 1 , the referee 
may, if he has reason to beheve the person is con- 
nected in any way with one of the boxers, dis- 
qualify that boxer. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 105, revised. 



106. The referee shall, 

(a) inspect the golves, faces and bodies of the 
boxers in the ring, and subject to subsection 
2 of section 92, take precautions to prevent a 
boxer from using grease or other substance 
that might handicap his opponent or result 
in an unfair advantage ; 

(6) determine the winner and loser of each round 
by a system of points scored in accordance 
with section 103; 

(c) record on a score-sheet points awarded 
boxers in each round ; 

{d) at the end of the contest, total the number 
of points awarded each boxer and on a shp 
of paper write, 

(i) the name of the boxer awarded the 
greater number of points, or 

(ii) the word "draw" where each boxer 
has been awarded the same number 
of points, 

and hand the shp to the master of cere- 
monies ; 



384 



ATHLETICS CONTROL 



Reg. 65 



(e) stop a contest or exhibition if he considers 
the boxers so unevenly matched that the 
contest or exhibition is not a fair one and 
award the decision to the boxer who is 
leading ; 

(/) stop a contest or exhibition if he considers 
it advisable because of the condition of a 
boxer; and 

ig) within twenty-four hours after the contest 
or exhibition transmit the score-sheet to 
the Commissioner. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 106. 

107. — (1) Where a boxer commits a major foul, 
the referee shall stop the bout and disqualify him if he 
is of the opinion that the other boxer, because of the 
foul, is unable to continue or is unable to resume the 
contest or exhibition after what the referee considers 
a reasonable length of time. 

(2) Where the boxer is disqualified under subsec- 
tion 1, the referee shall award the decision to the 
other boxer. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 107. 

108. The referee may consult the judges as to 
whether a boxer has struck the other boxer below the 
belt. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 108. 

109. Subject to subsection 1 of section 107, the 
referee shall warn a boxer who commits a foul. 
O.Reg. 26/67, s. 109 

110. — (1) The referee may stop a contest or 
exhibition where he considers that, 

(a) one of the boxers is not trying to win ; 

(6) one of the boxers has committed an act 
detrimental to boxing ; or 

(c) neither boxer is trying to win. 

(2) Where the contest or exhibition is stopped 
under clause a or 6 of subsection 1 , the referee shall 
award the decision to the other boxer. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 110. 

111. The referee shall not touch the boxers during 
a contest or exhibition unless they fail to separate 
upon his command "break". O. Reg. 26/67, s. 111. 

EQUIPMENT 

112. — (1) There shall be a ring at least eighteen 
feet square but not more than twenty-four feet 
square. 

(2) The floor of the ring shall, 

(a) extend beyond the ropes at least eighteen 
inches ; and 

(6) be padded with felt or other soft material at 
least one and one-half inches thick. 



(3) The portion of the floor of the ring outside the 
ropes shall be called the "apron". 

(4) The padding on the floor of the ring shall, 

{a) extend at least one foot beyond the ropes; 

and 
(b) be covered with canvas, duck or other 

similar material tightly stretched and laced 

to the floor of the ring. O. Reg. 26/67, 

s. 112, revised. 

113. The ring shall, 

{a) be not more than four feet above the sur- 
rounding floor ; and 

{b) have steps leading to it suitable for use by 
boxers and officials. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 113. 

114. At each corner of the ring there shall be a 
wood or metal post, 

(a) at least eighteen inches from the ropes; 

{b) not more than three inches in diameter; 
and 

(c) extending from the floor of the ring to a 
height of fifty-eight inches. O. Reg. 
26/67,8.114. 

115. — (1) There shall be three ropes each at least 
an inch in diameter. 

(2) The ropes shall be, 

{a) eighteen, thirty-five and fifty-two inches, 
respectively, above the floor of the ring; 
and 

(6) wrapped with a soft material. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 115. 

116. — (1) There shall be a bell or gong of sufficient 
volume that when rung or sounded it can be heard 
distinctly by the boxers and officials. 

(2) Where a gong is used, it shall be attached 
securely to the ring or to some other suitable object 
close at hand. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 116. 

117. A boxer shall wear new gloves in a main 
bout. O.Reg. 26/67, s. 117. 

118.— (1) Each glove shall weigh at least eight 
ounces. 

(2) The laces shall be tied on the outside of the 
back of the wrists of the gloves. O. Reg. 26/67, 
s. 118. 

119. — (1) A boxer may wrap on each hand not 
more than six feet of soft, cloth bandage not more 
than two inches wide. 



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ATHLETICS CONTROL 



385 



(2) The bandage may be held in place by surgeon's 
adhesive tape, 

{a) not more than one inch wide ; 

{b) for heavy-weights and light heavy-weights, 
not more than three feet long ; and 

(c) for other weights, not more than two feet 
long. 

(3) Before a bandage is applied, a boxer may 
apply, to the back of each hand, surgeon's adhesive 
tape not more than six inches long or one inch wide. 

(4) The adhesive tape shall not be applied across 
the knuckles. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 1 19. 

120. A person who holds a professional boxing 
contest or exhibition shall provide, 

{a) each boxer with a water bucket and 
powdered resin for canvas ; and 

{b) a stool for each of the chief seconds. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 120. 

121. — (I) A boxer may wear gum-shields. 

(2) A boxer shall wear a protection cup. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 121. 

122. — (1) A boxer shall wear, 

(a) clean, neat trunks, other than tights, ex- 
tending from a point not above the navel 
to a point not higher than half-way between 
the knees and the crotch ; and 

(b) shoes of a soft material and without heels, 
cleats, spikes or hard soles. 

(2) The trunks of opposing boxers shall be of con- 
trasting colours. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 122. 

123.— (1) No boxer shall wear clothing bearing 
any advertising or wording other than his name. 

(2) No manager or second shall wear clothing 
bearing any advertising or wording other than the 
name of the boxer he represents. O. Reg. 26/67, 
s. 123. 



PART III 

AMATEUR WRESTLING 

124. This Part applies to amateur wrestling 
contests and exhibitions. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 124. 

125. In this Part, "tournament" means a contest 
in which more than two wrestlers take part. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 125. 



126. The weight-classes in amateur wrestling are, 
{a) fly-weight of not more than 114 1/2 pounds; 

(b) bantam-weight of more than 114 1/2 but not 
more than 125^4 pounds ; 

(c) feather-weight of more than 125 1/2 but not 
more than 136 V2 pounds ; 

{d) light-weight of more than 136 V2 but not 
more than 147 1/2 pounds ; 

(e) welter-weight of more than 147^/2 but not 
more than 160 14 pounds; 

(/) middle-weight of more than 160 1/2 but not 
more than 1 74 pounds ; 

ig) light heavy-weight of more than 1 74 but not 
more than 191 pounds ; and 

{h) heavy-weight of more than 191 pounds. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 126. 

127. — (1) Except under a hcence in Form 5, no 
person shall hold an amateur wresthng contest or 
exhibition. 

(2) The fee for the hcence is $2. 

(3) The licence is valid only for the contest or 
exhibition specified therein. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 127. 

128. A person holding a hcence in Form 5 shall 
make a report in Form 2 to the Commissioner not 
later than ten days after the contest or exhibition is 
held. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 128. 

129. — (1) Except under a hcence in Form 6, no 
person shall take part in an amateur wrestling contest 
or exhibition. 

(2) No fee is payable for a hcence in Form 6. 

(3) The hcence expires with the 31st day of March 
next following the date of issue. O. Reg. 26/67, 
s. 129. 

130. — (1) Except under a hcence in Form 7, no 
person shall referee an amateur wrestling contest or - 
or exhibition. 

(2) No fee is payable for a licence in Form 7. 

(3) The licence expires with the 31st day of March 
next following the date of issue. O. Reg. 26/67, 
s. 130. 

131. Where the Commissioner considers it neces- 
sary in the interests of organized sport, he may order 
any amateur wrestling contest or exhibition to be 
stopped and every person holding, officiating at, or 
taking part in the contest or exhibition shall obey 
the order. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 131. 



386 



ATHLETICS CONTROL 



Reg. 65 



132. — (1) An exhibition of amateur wrestling shall 
consist of demonstrating the holds permitted under 
sections 133 to 175. 

(2) No decision shall be awarded at the exhibition. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 132. 

RULES 

133. A wrestler may file an entry in an amateur 
wrestling tournament, 

(a) in his own weight-class ; or 

(b) in his own weight-class and the weight- 
class next heavier, 

but, at the time of the weighing-in, he shall declare 
the weight-class in which he intends to take part. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 133. 

134. — (1) A wrestler who enters an amateur 
wrestUng contest or exhibition shall weigh in not 
sooner than eight hours or later than five hours 
before the contest or exhibition begins but during 
this period he may weigh in more than once. 

(2) The wrestler shall weigh in in wrestUng attire 
or in the nude. 

(3) Where a tournament lasts more than one day, 
wrestlers who have not been eliminated shall weigh 
in once only on each day after the first day. O. Reg. 
26/67, s. 134. 

135. — (1) A wrestler who enters an amateur 
wresthng contest or exhibition shall take a medical 
examination conducted by a legally qualified medical 
practitioner at the time of the weighing-in. 

(2) A wrestler in a tournament shall take a medical 
examination conducted by a legally quahfied medical 
practitioner each day of the tournament at the time 
of the weighing-in. 

(3) Where the wrestler is unable to pass the 
examination, he shall not take part in the contest, 
exhibition or tournament. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 135. 

136. A wrestler shall at the time he weighs in draw 
by lot a number to be retained by him throughout 
the tournament. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 136. 

137. — (1) Where the number of wrestlers in the 
first round of a tournament is even, the wrestlers 
who hold numbers one and two, and each succeed- 
ing two wrestlers, shall be paired for that round. 

(2) Where the number of wrestlers in the second 
round is even, 

(a) the wrestlers who hold the numbers one and 
three, and each succeeding two wrestlers 
who hold odd numbers ; and 



{b) the wrestlers who hold numbers two and 
four and each succeeding two wrestlers who 
hold even numbers, 

shall be paired for that round. 

(3) The pairings for the third and subsequent 
rounds shall be made in accordance with the scheme 
under subsections 1 and 2. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 137. 

138. — (1) Where the number of wrestlers in the 
first round of a tournament is uneven, the wrestlers 
whose names are first and second on the list, and 
each succeeding two wrestlers, shall be paired. 

(2) Where the number of wrestlers in the first 
round is uneven, the wrestler who holds the highest 
number shall have a bye into the second round but 
shall be placed at the top of the list for that round. 

(3) Where the number of wrestlers in the second 
round is uneven, the wrestler who holds the next 
highest number shall have a bye into the third round 
but shall be placed at the top of the list for that round. 

(4) Where the number of wrestlers in the third 
round is uneven, the wrestler who holds the next 
highest number shall have a bye into the fourth round 
but shall be placed at the top of the list for that round. 

(5) Where the number of wrestlers in the fourth 
round is uneven, the wrestler who holds the next 
highest number shall have a bye into the fifth round 
but shall be placed at the top of the hst for that round. 

(6) Where the number of wrestlers in the fifth 
round is uneven, the wrestler who holds the next 
highest number shall have a bye into the sixth round 
but shall be placed at the top of the list for that 
round. O. Reg. 26/67. s. 138. 

139. A person holding an amateur wresthng tour- 
nament shall post in a conspicuous place, in the 
building where the tournament is to be held, a list 
setting forth the pairing of the wrestlers for each 
round. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 139. 

140. — (1) The maximum time for an amateur 
wrestUng bout is fifteen minutes. 

(2) A fall or a disqualification shaU end the bout. 
O. Reg. 26/67, s. 140. 

141. A wrestler shaU not, 

(a) have grease or vaseline or any sUppery sub- 
stance on his hands, arms or other part of 
his body ; 

(6) wear a bandage on his hand or wrist except 
when prescribed by the medical practi- 
tioner ; 

(c) have long fingernails ; or 



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ATHLETICS CONTROL 



387 



{d) wear a ring or bracelet or anything that 
might injure his opponent. O. Reg. 26/67, 
s. 141. 

142. — (1) Subject to subsection 2, where a wrestler 
called for his bout does not appear on the mat im- 
mediately or refuses to begin the bout, he shall be 
penahzed three points and his opponent shall be 
given zero points. 

(2) Where a wrestler is called for the first bout on 
the first day of a tournament, he shall be allowed 
not more than five minutes to appear. O. Reg. 
26/67. s. 142. 

143. A bout shall be begun, interrupted and ended 
only by the whistle of the referee. O. Reg. 26/67, 
s. 143. 

144. — (1) At the beginning of a bout, the wrestlers 
shall be at opposite corners of the mat diagonally 
across from one another. 

(2) When the referee blows his whistle, the 
wrestlers shall advance to the centre of the mat, 
shake hands with their right hands, pass one an- 
other, turn around leftward and begin the bout. 
O. Reg. 26/67. s. 144. 

145. — (1) There shall be a referee and three judges 
for each bout. 

(2) During a bout the referee shall speak only to 
the judges, the timekeeper, and the wrestlers and a 
judge shall speak only to the referee, the timekeeper 
or another judge. O. Reg. 26/67. s. 145. 

146.— (1) Where, 

(a) the referee declares a fall and one judge 
agrees with him ; 

(b) the referee declares a fall and two or three 
of the judges do not protest ; or 

(c) the three judges declare a fall, 

the wrestler obtaining the fall is the winner of the 
bout. 

(2) A fall shall be declared where the shoulders of 
a wrestler touch the mat at the same time and there 
is a cessation of movement which leaves no doubt 
that the shoulders have touched the mat at the same 
time. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 146. 

147. A wrestler who obtains a fall shall receive 
zero points and his opponent shall be penalized three 
points. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 147. 

148. — (1) Where neither wrestler obtains a fall 
during the bout, each judge shall name as winner the 
wrestler to whom he has awarded the greater 
number of points. 



(2) The wrestler named as winner by the majority 
of judges is the winner of the bout and shall be 
penalized one point. 

(3) The loser of the bout shall be penalized three 
points. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 148. 

149. — (1) Where a wrestler is penahzed a total of 
five points or more, he shall thereupon be eliminated 
from the tournament. 

(2) Where wrestlers are eliminated in the same 
round of a tournament, they shall be deemed to 
have been eliminated at the same time. 

(3) Where two wrestlers eliminated with an equal 
number of points in the same round are tied for 
third place in a weight-class, they shall be paired but 
only where they have not already wrestled each 
other in that tournament. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 149. 

150. The winner of a weight-class in a tournament 
is the wrestler who has the least number of points 
in his weight-class. O. Reg. 26/67, s. 150. 

151. — (1) Where two wrestlers are tied each with 
the least number of points in his weigh